Stories about: Devices

StrabisPIX: Assessing strabismus from patients’ smartphone photos

strabismus smartphone
(Lapina/Shutterstock)

New smartphone-based diagnostic tools are enabling consumers to take their temperatures, diagnose simple skin conditions and much more. As advanced smartphone imaging puts more and more capabilities in patients’ hands, it’s no surprise that clinicians and numerous digital health startups are leveraging them.

As a case in point, the Department of Ophthalmology and the Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) at Boston Children’s Hospital have co-developed a smartphone application for patients with strabismus, or misalignment of the eyes, to securely capture and transmit photos of their eyes to their providers.

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Medicine meets theater: Pediatrics training, parent practice, device innovation ‘on location’

medical simulation

Pediatric medicine just took a step for the better in Boston’s Longwood Medical Area with a new, expanded pediatric Simulation (SIM) Center — a dedicated space where doctors, nurses and other staff can rehearse tough medical situations or practice tricky or rare procedures in a clinical setting that looks and feels real.

But clinicians aren’t the only ones who will be using the new 4,000-square-foot facility, which incorporates real medical equipment, set design and special effects.

Families can get hands-on practice with medical equipment they’ll be using at home. Inventors and “hackers” can develop and test new devices or software platforms and see how they perform in a life-like clinical environment. Planned hacks, for example, will explore different medical and surgical applications for voice-activated and gesture-controlled devices.

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Reimagining connected health through home hubs

home health hubs

Through smart home hubs and the growing Internet of Things, people can now control lights, thermostats and other appliances and get information and entertainment with their always-connected digital devices. Consumers have widely adopted home automation products like Nest from Google and ecosystems like Apple’s HomeKit and Amazon’s Alexa.

But home hubs also have the potential to achieve the promise of connected health — access to health care services anywhere and anytime.

Home hubs can deliver enormous value as a means of health care delivery — not just helping casual consumers become familiar with their health and take preventive measures, but also helping manage complex care for patients with chronic illness and supporting timely decision making by clinical teams. Everybody involved with a person’s care can be plugged in, enabling coordination across providers and caregivers in a way that’s increasingly intuitive and meaningful.

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From NICU dad to citizen scientist: Creating a smart pulse oximeter

Morris Family
Jon and Sarah Morris with 7-year-old twins Drew and Emma

When Sarah and Jon Morris’ twins were born nine weeks early, they embarked on a journey largely dictated by their children’s medical needs. While son Drew was thriving, daughter Emma was severely compromised and was transferred to Boston Children’s Hospital’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). “We felt powerless,” remembers Jon. “Every time we thought we had made progress, we had a setback. It’s always two steps forward, one step back in the NICU. That backwards step always hit the hardest.”

After 296 days at Boston Children’s, Emma went home tethered to breathing and feeding tubes. The Morrises had a pulse oximeter at home to regularly test Emma’s blood oxygen level.

There were frustrating limitations to Emma’s oximeter:

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News Notes: Headlines in science and innovation

An occasional roundup of news items Vector finds noteworthy.

Zika’s surface in stunning detail; mosquito tactics

Zika virus
(Purdue University image/courtesy of Kuhn and Rossmann research groups)

We haven’t curbed the Zika epidemic yet. But cryo-electron microscopy — a newer, faster alternative to X-ray crystallography — at least reveals the structure of the virus, which has been linked to microcephaly (though not yet definitively). The anatomy of the virus’s projections gives clues to how the virus is able to attach to and infect cells, and could provide toeholds for developing antiviral treatments and vaccines. Read coverage in the Washington Post and see the full paper in Science.

Meanwhile, as The New York Times reports, scientists are coming together in an effort to control Zika by genetically manipulating the mosquito that spreads it, Aedes aegypti.

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Inside bridge-enhanced ACL repair

An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear can be a devastating sports injury. Every year, 400,000 people, many of them teen and young adult athletes, sustain ACL injuries or tears. Martha Murray, MD, an orthopedic surgeon at Boston Children’s Hospital, worked with a team of colleagues to create a new procedure known as bridge-enhanced ACL repair (BEAR) that encourages natural healing. Watch this animation to see how it works:

Why do surgeons need a better way to repair ACL injuries?

The current standard of care, surgical ACL reconstruction, is a good solution. But it is linked with a 20 percent risk of re-tearing the ACL, and many young patients face an increased risk of arthritis. Instead of removing the torn ACL and replacing it with a tendon graft, the BEAR technique uses a special protein-enriched sponge to encourage the torn ends to reconnect and heal. The researchers have completed a 20-patient safety trial and are enrolling additional patients in a 200-patient clinical study.

Learn more about Murray’s research.

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News notes: Headlines in science & innovation

An occasional roundup of news items Vector finds interesting.

Blood-brain barrier on chip

vector news - blood brain barrier chip
(Wyss Institute at Harvard University)

The blood-brain barrier protects the brain against potentially damaging molecules, but its gate-keeping can also prevent helpful drugs from getting into the central nervous system. Reporting in PLoS One, a team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering describes a 3-D blood-brain barrier on a chip — a hollow blood vessel lined with living human endothelial cells and surrounded by a collagen matrix bearing human pericytes and astrocytes.

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Making rare operations common through special effects simulation

What if I told you that there was a new technology that improved outcomes for patients of all ages, reduced pain and suffering, reduced time in the operating room, reduced anesthetic times and, the more you did it, the better it benefited patients. And here’s the kicker — it has no side effects. And it’s available everywhere care is delivered.”

That’s what critical care physician Peter Weinstock, MD, PhD, described at his recent TEDx talk in the Boston suburb of Natick.

Weinstock is director of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Simulator Program, SIMPeds. The technology is ultra-high-fidelity medical simulation coupled with a simple concept: practicing before game time.

I mean really practicing.

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Ten child health innovations headed to SXSWi

Impact Pediatric Health child health innovation
(U.S. Army/Lori Yerden via Flickr)

Innovation in pediatrics is alive and well. On March 14, at the South by Southwest Interactive (SXSWi) festival in Austin, Tex., Impact Pediatric Health will run its second annual pitch competition for digital health and medical device startups. Based on the ten child health innovations to be pitched, it promises to be as inspiring as last year’s event.

Judges include representatives from the four founding hospitals — Boston Children’s Hospital, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Texas Children’s Hospital and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia — and from Sesame Workshop, whose recently announced Sesame Ventures plans to support companies that “help kids grow smarter, stronger and kinder.”

John Brownstein, PhD, chief innovation officer at Boston Children’s and one of the judges on the panel, agrees with that mission. “When it comes to innovation, pediatrics is often a second thought or gets left out altogether,” he says. “I’m extremely impressed with the landscape this year and the breadth of startup ideas.”

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9 science and innovation predictions for 2016

science and innovation predictions for 2016
Everett Collection/Shutterstock

What does 2016 have in store in the realm of science and clinical innovation? Vector asked clinical, digital and business leaders from around Boston Children’s Hospital to offer their forecasts.

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