Stories about: Devices

An iPhone and a bucket help diagnose vestibular problems in dizzy children

dizziness vestibular bucket testDizziness is fairly common in children, but it can be very hard to diagnose the cause. Any number of conditions can produce dizziness, and children are a special challenge since they often can’t describe what they’re feeling.

“One of the toughest things to figure out is, is it a problem with the vestibular system, or is it part of something else, a heart problem or an eye problem?” says Jacob Brodsky, MD, director of the Balance and Vestibular Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. “Then, the next challenging part is determining whether it is an inner ear problem or a central vestibular disorder — a problem with the brain.”

A definitive answer often requires a battery of tests that few providers outside Boston Children’s can perform in children, as they require sophisticated and expensive equipment. But with an ordinary bucket, an iPhone, an $18 app and some Velcro, Brodsky can quickly get a good indication of whether a child has a vestibular problem—and specifically an inner ear problem.

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8 winning innovations at Hacking Pediatrics

general hackersHacking Pediatrics, now in its third year, continues to experiment with its format. 2015’s “Mashup” had a greater focus on partnerships, curation and delivering value to innovators at Boston Children’s Hospital. The brunt of the idea pitching and team formation took place in advance, allowing the event, on November 14, to be collapsed into one day.

The Hacking Pediatrics team (Kate Donovan, Mike Docktor, Meg McCabe, Cassandra Bannos and Leila Amerling) brokered collaborations with a dozen industry partners such as Microsoft, Cerner, Box, CVS Health and Boston Scientific. Over the course of a hectic 12-hour day, they worked with 17 teams of Boston Children’s innovators and experts from partner organizations who presented their final ideas to a panel of judges.

In another change for 2015, the Hacking Pediatrics team issued nine awards — but no immediate prizes. This was meant to incentivize teams to continue to work and meet milestones to earn real rewards, like a $10,000 design prize offered up by design firm Mad*Pow.

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Rock Health, Boston Children’s Hospital join to speed pediatric digital health startups

Bridget Duffy MDBoston Children’s Hospital and Rock Health, a venture fund dedicated to digital health, announced a strategic partnership aimed at accelerating pediatric health technologies during the hospital’s 2015 Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards. Bridget Duffy, MD, is chair of Rock Health, chief Medical Officer of Vocera and co-founder of the Experience Innovation Network.

As a physician, entrepreneur, and especially as a parent, I am excited and inspired by a partnership between Rock Health and Boston Children’s Hospital to identify promising companies and cultivate emerging technologies focused on transforming pediatric care. Together, Rock Health and Boston Children’s Hospital will seed bigger ideas, accelerate adoption of new solutions, and massively change the way medicine is delivered to every child.

A global leader in pediatric clinical care, Boston Children’s Hospital will lend its expertise to support Rock Health’s portfolio and help shape the next generation of innovations. While Rock Health already has a proven track record with companies in this space, such as Kurbo Health, Cellscope and Kinsights, this close relationship with Boston Children’s will greatly accelerate the design and evaluation of new solutions, improving the health care experience for children and their caregivers.

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Innovation Tank: And the winner is … AIR

Innovation Tank
Kevin Cedrone presents AIR to the judges at the Innovation Tank

“These start-ups are really looking to change the world. [They won’t be] the next Uber or Facebook. [Instead] they will really affect lives in the pediatric space,” said Troy Carter, founder and CEO of the entertainment company Atom Factory and newly named guest shark on ABC’s “Shark Tank,” as he introduced the Innovation Tank at the Boston Children’s Hospital Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards.

Though each of the three participating innovations promised a tremendous impact on kids, the six judges agreed on the ultimate Innovation Tank winner and awarded a $30,000 investment to the Augmented Infant Resuscitator (AIR).

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Hollywood SFX take medical training to a new level of realism

When critical care physicians at Boston Children’s Hospital practice cannulating an infant going on cardiopulmonary support, they’ll no longer have to cut through hard plastic mannequins with tubes for blood vessels. Instead, they’ll puncture a soft layer of realistic baby skin, dissect through subcutaneous fat and spread muscles that look and feel like the real thing.

They’ll insert the cannula into an internal jugular vein and carotid artery that are thin and flexible, after dissecting through their covering sheath. As they advance the cannula, the blood will have the right viscosity.

These mannequins are not your father’s Resusci-Anne. They’re the creation of the special make-up effects company Fractured FX, whose current credits include Cinemax’s The Knick, and Boston Children’s simulator program, SIMPeds.

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Pediatric solutions: Which 5-minute pitch will ‘ignite’ the Taking on Tomorrow audience?


Affordable home dialysis, a device to triage heart murmurs, a cardiopulmonary support enhancer, a novel technology to treat septic shock and a better system for studying neurological function. Which of these ideas will catch fire?

The audience will decide November 10 at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Ignite Talks Competition. Hosted by Chris Duffy, Host of WBUR’s You’re the Expert and presented by Deloitte, the event will close out the hospital’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2015.

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An eye on epilepsy: The work, life and innovations of Tobias Loddenkemper, MD

Epileptologist Tobias Loddenkemper, MD, director of clinical epilepsy research at Boston Children’s Hospital, is a seizure whisperer. He keeps a close watch on his patients, trying to discern seizure patterns and head off the developmental and learning problems that seizures can cause. A pioneer in the emerging field of chronoepileptology, he has partnered with Empatica and other companies to develop reliable seizure detection devices that could help doctors better time medication dosing and help prevent death from seizures, a real risk in children with severe epilepsy.

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Three child-focused products to compete at Boston Children’s Hospital Innovation Tank

The creators of a powered arm brace, a device to aid newborn resuscitation and a platform for virtual nutritional consults have been chosen to present at Boston Children’s Hospital’s second annual pitch competition—otherwise known as the Innovation Tank—during the hospital’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2015.

Augmented Infant Resuscitator Myomo Kindrdfood

Presented by the health care company Philips, the November 9 competition will be hosted by Troy Carter, founder and CEO of the entertainment company Atom Factory (managing Lady Gaga, among others) and newly named guest shark on ABC’s Shark Tank.

A la Shark Tank, each team will pitch its health care innovation to a panel of venture capitalists, clinicians and industry leaders, who will decide how to award $30,000 in sponsored prize money and offer advice on how to advance projects to market.

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Brain stimulation for status epilepticus?

Seizure-storm concept-Linda Bucklin-shutterstock_172455803Status epilepticus, a state of prolonged seizures, is a life-threatening medical emergency. The average mortality rate is 20 percent, and people who survive sustain lasting neurologic damage. Aborting the seizures is of the essence, but about 30 to 40 percent of patients don’t respond to lorazepam, the first-line drug usually given, and the drug itself can cause respiratory depression.

A study in rat model of status epilepticus, led by Alexander Rotenberg, MD, PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Department of Neurology, is the first to test an emerging approach known as transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) as a way of halting acute seizures. tDCS applies a weak, direct current to the brain via scalp electrodes, to either increase or—more relevant for seizures—decrease excitability in selected areas. In the study, tDCS reduced the duration of acute seizures in the rats. When it was used together with lorazepam, the combination appeared to have a synergistic effect, also preventing new seizures from starting.

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From napkin sketch to new product: Rapid prototyping service speeds medical device development

rapid 3D prototyping services at hospitals
These custom devices hold fiber optic probes used to measure blood oxygenation in newborns. (Courtesy Noah Schulz, SIMPeds)

Some people bring data and completed designs. Others just bring simple sketches. “We have this idea for this device,” they begin. “It may only help 15 kids a year, but it could really improve their quality of life.”

Other people bring only a clinical need: “We need something to keep babies lying still after their procedure, without having to medicate them.”

To make these ideas more tangible and help launch them down a formal development path, the Boston Children’s Hospital Simulator Program, SIMPeds, has begun making its 3D printing and engineering service available to help hospital staff rapidly prototype new devices.

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