Stories about: Devices

My work, my life, my innovations: Ken Mandl, MD, MPH

Ken Mandl, MD, MPH, director of the Boston Children’s Hospital Computational Health Informatics Program, is used to seeing the world through a different lens. In high school, he began clicking photographs with his camera and developing them in a darkroom in his basement. Now, he frames subjects through the lens of epidemiology and informatics—driving discovery and care transformation through big data, apps and large-scale federated research networks.

Mandl will be one of four panelists discussing The Future of Pediatric Precision Medicine at Boston Children’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2015. Read more about his life, work and innovations by hovering over the objects that surround him everyday.

Learn more about the Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2015 and register to attend.

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Hold me, turn me: 3D printed models help doctors rehearse tricky cerebrovascular procedures

Vein of Galen-3D-20140418_Orbach-croppedFour children with life-threatening malformations of blood vessels in the brain appear to be the first to benefit from 3D printing of their anatomy before undergoing high-risk corrective procedures.

The children, ranging from 2 months to 16 years old, all posed particular treatment challenges: cerebrovascular disease often entails complex tangles of vessels in sensitive brain areas.

“These children had unique anatomy with deep vessels that were very tricky to operate on,” says Boston Children’s neurosurgeon Edward Smith, MD, senior author of the paper and co-director of the hospital’s Cerebrovascular Surgery and Interventions Center. “The 3D-printed models allowed us to rehearse the cases beforehand and reduce operative risk as much as we could. You can physically hold the 3D models, view them from different angles, practice the operation with real instruments and get tactile feedback.”

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Daniel Kohane, MD, PhD, at TEDMED: “Smart vehicles for safer medications”

“The drugs that I take don’t just go to the places in my body they’re supposed to go to do the things they do. They actually go everywhere. And what they do in those other places can be whatever.”

With those words, Daniel Kohane, MD, PhD—director of the Laboratory for Biomaterials and Drug Delivery at Boston Children’s Hospital—launched into a TEDMED talk about technologies that get drugs to where they need to go with much greater precision, like:

“Progress in this field is limited only by the imagination of the investigators and, to some degree, by reality,” says Kohane, who also sees patients in Boston Children’s Department of Critical Care Medicine. “You can achieve really big things by thinking really small.”

Click the image above to watch his whole talk.

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New and improved device shows promise for pediatric heart surgery

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In the Norwood procedure for HLHS, a graft creates a conduit between the right ventricle and the aorta, diverting blood flow from the underdeveloped left ventricle. But that graft can wear out. (BLUE represents oxygen-poor blood; RED, oxygen-rich blood; PURPLE, a mixture of the two.)

Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a rare but serious form of congenital heart disease that leaves the left pumping chamber (ventricle) of the heart severely underdeveloped. Children born with HLHS can’t pump enough oxygenated blood from their heart to the rest of their body and need surgery as soon as possible to survive. Treatment ultimately involves three corrective surgeries throughout the infant and toddler years.

The first surgery, known as the Norwood procedure, is the riskiest of the three. Ideally performed within the first week of life, the procedure re-routes the heart’s plumbing to ensure enough oxygenated blood is circulated while the child grows big enough for the second surgery. A device called a graft is used to connect the fully-functional right ventricle to the aorta, bypassing the stunted left ventricle, for proper blood flow. However, with each ventricular contraction, the graft gets squeezed, which can cause it to shift or lose its shape over time. Repeat interventions to adjust the graft are often needed.

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‘Huggable’ robot may ease kids’ hospital stress


Can a robotic talking bear have therapeutic value? “The Bear,” part of a New York Times video series called Robotica, offers a glimpse of Huggable’s potential when Beatrice Lipp, a child with a chronic medical condition, visits the hospital, nervous about what’s to come.

“We want to offer kids one more way of helping them to feel OK where they are in what’s otherwise a really stressful experience,” explains Dierdre Logan, PhD, director of Psychological Services for Pain Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Huggable, a creation of the MIT Media Lab’s Personal Robots Group and the Boston Children’s Simulator Program, comes into Beatrice’s room to chat, play games like “I Spy” and tell jokes. The session is recorded on video, and a bracelet called a Q Sensor collects Beatrice’s physiologic data–changes in skin conductance, temperature and motion that may indicate distress. Researchers at Northeastern University are analyzing these data to gauge the robot’s effect. Eventually, Huggable will be able to react to the data and respond accordingly—offering relaxation exercises and guided imagery, for example, if a child remains anxious.

Currently, Huggable is voiced by Child Life staff, but the ultimate goal is for it to work autonomously. Beatrice is part of a 90-child study comparing Huggable, an ordinary teddy bear and a tablet Huggable image.

I admit: My immediate thought on seeing Huggable was that kids would immediately see him (her?) as a fake, but the bear’s robotic nature doesn’t seem to faze them. As Logan says in the video:

I think there’s a way of connecting with kids that’s different than what grownups have to offer. They have incredible imaginations. And they can really suspend disbelief. There can be a true relationship that develops between Huggable and a patient.

See another child interacting with Huggable.

 

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My work, my life: Michael J. Docktor, MD

Michael J. Docktor, MD, Boston Children’s Hospital’s clinical director of Innovation and director of Clinical Mobile Solutions, is also a practicing gastroenterologist, a proud father of two and a passionate mobile-and-digital health trailblazer. An original co-founder of Hacking Pediatrics, Docktor’s goal is to bridge the gap between entrepreneurship, consumer technology, design and clinical pain points.

Hover over the images and icons in the photo below to learn more about Docktor’s professional and personal life, favorite gadgets and more.

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What we’ve been reading: Week of May 18, 2015

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From cancer to feet: the power of Twitter in healthcare (MedCity News)
Why does Twitter care about the healthcare industry? Craig Hashi, one of two Twitter engineers dedicated to healthcare, details the opportunities.

MIT’s implantable device could help docs determine best cancer medicine (Boston Business Journal)
Removing the trial and error associated with cancer drug treatments is high on oncologists’ wish lists. Heeding that call, MIT has developed an implantable device (about the size of a grain of rice) that can carry up to 30 different drug doses to a cancerous tumor, and then be removed to test responses.

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Sounding out intracranial pressure with a hearing test

Heidary ear ICP measurement croppedBrain tumors, traumatic head injury and a number of brain and nervous system conditions can cause pressure to build up inside the skull. As intracranial pressure (ICP) rises, it can compress the brain and result in swelling of the optic nerves, damaging brain tissue and causing irreversible vision loss.

That’s what nearly happened to a 13-year-old boy who had three weeks of uncontrolled headaches and sudden double vision. His neuro-ophthalmologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, Gena Heidary, MD, PhD, found reduced vision in the right eye, along with poor peripheral vision, an enlarged blind spot and swelling of both optic nerves.

As Heidary suspected, he had idiopathic intracranial hypertension, a condition that can raise ICP both in children and adults. Heidary performed an operation around the optic nerve to relieve the pressure, and vision in the boy’s right eye gradually improved, though not completely. Heidary has had to monitor his ICP ever since to protect his visual system from further irreversible damage.

Unfortunately, such monitoring currently is pretty invasive.

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The silk scaffold: A promising road to hollow organ reconstruction

Silk photo_black backgroundSilk production and global interest in the lustrous fiber date back to prehistoric times. Today, the natural protein is solidifying itself as a biomaterials alternative in the world of regenerative medicine.

A recent study conducted by Boston Children’s Hospital urologist Carlos Estrada, MD and bioengineer Joshua Mauney, PhD, shows two-layer, biodegradable silk scaffolds to be a promising cell-free, “off-the-shelf” alternative to traditional implants for the reconstruction of hollow gastrointestinal structures such as the esophagus.

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Pediatric innovators showcase highlights inventions

Innovators Showcase Boston Children's HospitalSome great inventions were on view this week at the second annual Boston Children’s Hospital Innovators Showcase. Hosted by the hospital’s Innovation Acceleration Program and Technology & Innovation Development Office, the event featured everything from virtual reality goggles with gesture control to biomedical technologies. Below are a few new projects that caught Vector’s eye (expect to hear more about them in the coming months), a kid-friendly interview about the SimLab and list of inventions kids themselves would like to see. (Photos by Katherine Cohen except as noted)

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