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9 science and innovation predictions for 2016

Everett Collection/Shutterstock
Everett Collection/Shutterstock

What does 2016 have in store in the realm of science and clinical innovation? Vector asked clinical, digital and business leaders from around Boston Children’s Hospital to offer their forecasts.

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In case you missed it: A look back at 2015

Dog looking back-cropped-Kim Britten-shutterstock_306257615It’s been another exciting year in science and innovation at Boston Children’s Hospital. Read on for a few Vector and audience favorites in science and technology.

 

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A filtration technology poised to cure sepsis

Sepsis is the most common cause of death in infants and children worldwide, and its incidence is increasing. Damage is caused not only by the bloodstream infection itself but by the systemic inflammatory cascade it triggers — which has been difficult to control without also causing long-lasting immune suppression. During a five-minute Ignite Talk at the 2015 Boston Children’s Hospital Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards, Brian McAlvin, MD, a critical care intensivist at Boston Children’s Hospital, introduced the audience to a filtration technology that could cure systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS).

SIRS, McAlvin noted, is the underlying mechanism for a variety of diseases, not just sepsis. His invention, the Antibody Modified Conduit, is essentially a small tube with antibodies painted on the inner surface that recognize and remove the inflammatory agents. “This technology allows us to choose the inflammatory molecules in the circulation,” says McAlvin, “and take them out of the blood as the condition evolves by changing the antibody that’s present.”

The talk won the pitch competition, earning McAlvin an Apple watch, a one-on-one mentoring session with an influential venture capitalist and a meet-and-greet with Boston Children’s innovation acceleration team, VCs and other stakeholders.

See more posts and videos from the Global Pediatric Innovation Summit.

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Accessible and affordable dialysis for children in developing countries


Children living outside industrialized nations have limited access to health care, and many children with severe kidney dysfunction do not have access to dialysis. Some developing countries have access to manual peritoneal dialysis, which requires the placement of a catheter into the abdominal cavity every one to two hours, 10 hours per day. But supplies are expensive, and many countries lack the infrastructure needed to get large quantities of dialysis fluid to children’s homes.

At the recent 2015 Boston Children’s Hospital Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards, pediatric nephrologist Sara Jandeska, MD, of Rush Children’s Hospital in Chicago, pitched a portable, affordable solution: providing just the dialysis salts.

See more posts and videos from the Global Pediatric Innovation Summit.

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The power of the pulse: Ventriflo re-imagines cardiopulmonary support

Is there anything more fundamental to human life than the heartbeat? That thud, thud, thud — that reliable rhythm — is synonymous with being alive.

When a person undergoes open-heart surgery, however, the heartbeat must be interrupted to give surgeons access to that essential organ. The organic pulse is temporarily replaced by a machine that provides continuous blood flow to the body.

Doug Vincent, President and CEO at Design Mentor, Inc., has been studying the ways in which current continuous flow devices fail to provide optimal cardio-pulmonary support. Vincent has designed his own support mechanism device that simulates the natural pulsating rhythm of the heart, called VentriFlo.

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Message banking: Giving a voice to adults with ALS and kids in the ICU

Roughly 30,000 people in the U.S. currently live with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal disease in which the motor nerve cells of the brain and spinal cord (which signal muscles to contract) slowly but progressively degenerate. Eventually, ALS robs people of the ability to move and speak.

But they can still have a voice.

“We can’t change someone’s medical diagnosis,” says John Costello, MA, CCC-SLP, director of Boston Children’s Augmentative Communication Program (ACP) at Boston Children’s Hospital. “But we can support people to maintain dignity, control and social connectedness while expressing their true selves and remaining active members of the world around them.”

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A bridge to a 21st century ACL repair

Tears of the knee’s anterior cruciate ligament — or ACL — are on the rise in middle school and high school athletes. The current treatment involves grafting in a piece of tendon from elsewhere in the body. It works very well, but requires six months to two years of post-op rehabilitation to regain strength in the knee and the place where the tendon was taken from (often the hamstring). Plus, up to 80 percent of patients develop arthritis within 15 years of the procedure.

Orthopedic surgeon Martha Murray, MD, wondered, “What if we could somehow stimulate the original ACL to heal back together?”

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An iPhone and a bucket help diagnose vestibular problems in dizzy children

dizziness vestibular bucket testDizziness is fairly common in children, but it can be very hard to diagnose the cause. Any number of conditions can produce dizziness, and children are a special challenge since they often can’t describe what they’re feeling.

“One of the toughest things to figure out is, is it a problem with the vestibular system, or is it part of something else, a heart problem or an eye problem?” says Jacob Brodsky, MD, director of the Balance and Vestibular Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. “Then, the next challenging part is determining whether it is an inner ear problem or a central vestibular disorder — a problem with the brain.”

A definitive answer often requires a battery of tests that few providers outside Boston Children’s can perform in children, as they require sophisticated and expensive equipment. But with an ordinary bucket, an iPhone, an $18 app and some Velcro, Brodsky can quickly get a good indication of whether a child has a vestibular problem—and specifically an inner ear problem.

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8 winning innovations at Hacking Pediatrics

general hackersHacking Pediatrics, now in its third year, continues to experiment with its format. 2015’s “Mashup” had a greater focus on partnerships, curation and delivering value to innovators at Boston Children’s Hospital. The brunt of the idea pitching and team formation took place in advance, allowing the event, on November 14, to be collapsed into one day.

The Hacking Pediatrics team (Kate Donovan, Mike Docktor, Meg McCabe, Cassandra Bannos and Leila Amerling) brokered collaborations with a dozen industry partners such as Microsoft, Cerner, Box, CVS Health and Boston Scientific. Over the course of a hectic 12-hour day, they worked with 17 teams of Boston Children’s innovators and experts from partner organizations who presented their final ideas to a panel of judges.

In another change for 2015, the Hacking Pediatrics team issued nine awards — but no immediate prizes. This was meant to incentivize teams to continue to work and meet milestones to earn real rewards, like a $10,000 design prize offered up by design firm Mad*Pow.

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Rock Health, Boston Children’s Hospital join to speed pediatric digital health startups

Bridget Duffy MDBoston Children’s Hospital and Rock Health, a venture fund dedicated to digital health, announced a strategic partnership aimed at accelerating pediatric health technologies during the hospital’s 2015 Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards. Bridget Duffy, MD, is chair of Rock Health, chief Medical Officer of Vocera and co-founder of the Experience Innovation Network.

As a physician, entrepreneur, and especially as a parent, I am excited and inspired by a partnership between Rock Health and Boston Children’s Hospital to identify promising companies and cultivate emerging technologies focused on transforming pediatric care. Together, Rock Health and Boston Children’s Hospital will seed bigger ideas, accelerate adoption of new solutions, and massively change the way medicine is delivered to every child.

A global leader in pediatric clinical care, Boston Children’s Hospital will lend its expertise to support Rock Health’s portfolio and help shape the next generation of innovations. While Rock Health already has a proven track record with companies in this space, such as Kurbo Health, Cellscope and Kinsights, this close relationship with Boston Children’s will greatly accelerate the design and evaluation of new solutions, improving the health care experience for children and their caregivers.

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