Stories about: Devices

What we’ve been reading: Week of May 18, 2015

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From cancer to feet: the power of Twitter in healthcare (MedCity News)
Why does Twitter care about the healthcare industry? Craig Hashi, one of two Twitter engineers dedicated to healthcare, details the opportunities.

MIT’s implantable device could help docs determine best cancer medicine (Boston Business Journal)
Removing the trial and error associated with cancer drug treatments is high on oncologists’ wish lists. Heeding that call, MIT has developed an implantable device (about the size of a grain of rice) that can carry up to 30 different drug doses to a cancerous tumor, and then be removed to test responses.

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Sounding out intracranial pressure with a hearing test

Heidary ear ICP measurement croppedBrain tumors, traumatic head injury and a number of brain and nervous system conditions can cause pressure to build up inside the skull. As intracranial pressure (ICP) rises, it can compress the brain and result in swelling of the optic nerves, damaging brain tissue and causing irreversible vision loss.

That’s what nearly happened to a 13-year-old boy who had three weeks of uncontrolled headaches and sudden double vision. His neuro-ophthalmologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, Gena Heidary, MD, PhD, found reduced vision in the right eye, along with poor peripheral vision, an enlarged blind spot and swelling of both optic nerves.

As Heidary suspected, he had idiopathic intracranial hypertension, a condition that can raise ICP both in children and adults. Heidary performed an operation around the optic nerve to relieve the pressure, and vision in the boy’s right eye gradually improved, though not completely. Heidary has had to monitor his ICP ever since to protect his visual system from further irreversible damage.

Unfortunately, such monitoring currently is pretty invasive.

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The silk scaffold: A promising road to hollow organ reconstruction

Silk photo_black backgroundSilk production and global interest in the lustrous fiber date back to prehistoric times. Today, the natural protein is solidifying itself as a biomaterials alternative in the world of regenerative medicine.

A recent study conducted by Boston Children’s Hospital urologist Carlos Estrada, MD and bioengineer Joshua Mauney, PhD, shows two-layer, biodegradable silk scaffolds to be a promising cell-free, “off-the-shelf” alternative to traditional implants for the reconstruction of hollow gastrointestinal structures such as the esophagus.

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Pediatric innovators showcase highlights inventions

Innovators Showcase Boston Children's HospitalSome great inventions were on view this week at the second annual Boston Children’s Hospital Innovators Showcase. Hosted by the hospital’s Innovation Acceleration Program and Technology & Innovation Development Office, the event featured everything from virtual reality goggles with gesture control to biomedical technologies. Below are a few new projects that caught Vector’s eye (expect to hear more about them in the coming months), a kid-friendly interview about the SimLab and list of inventions kids themselves would like to see. (Photos by Katherine Cohen except as noted)

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BabySee: Mobile app lets you see through an infant’s eyes

David Hunter, MD, PhD, chief of Ophthalmology at Boston Children’s Hospital, gets a lot of questions from parents, but the number one question is: “What can my baby see?”

That depends. How old is the baby?

Five days after birth, she might see something like the image at left; at 3 months, the image at right:

BabySee 5 days and 3 mos

At 6 months and 9 months, there’s increasing color and resolution:

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What we’ve been reading: Week of April 6, 2015

What we've been readingExome sequencing comes to the clinic (JAMA)
An approachable and thorough summary of the growing trend, describing the ways in which sequencing can help provide a diagnosis, the diagnostic yield (as high as 40 percent or more, depending on the population), how often the results have changed treatment decisions and the question of who pays.

Who Owns CRISPR? (The Scientist)
Excellent coverage of the escalating patent scramble for genome editing.

Doctors Make House Calls On Tablets Carried By Houston Firefighters (NPR)
Interesting use of telemedicine in Houston, where many people call 911 in non-emergency situations. EMTs carry tablets, and can have callers chat with a physician on a video app, avoiding the need to take them to the ED.

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Boston Children’s to host second annual Innovators’ Showcase

Ten or more monitors keep track of every child in the ICU. How can clinicians manage all the data they provide?  Surgical Sam beating heart pediatric trainer mannequin simulation Simulator Program The Chamberlain GroupA prototype of the warming pad. The white color indicates that the pad's "phase-change" material is in its solid state. (Courtesy of Anne Hansen)Silk worms could create tissues needed for urinary tract reconstruction.

 

(Clockwise from top: T3, Surgical Sam, non-electric baby warmer, silk-based organ reconstruction)

Next week—on April 15—Boston-area visitors can sample inventions and technologies from around Boston Children’s Hospital, some in development and some already in use. More than 20 medical innovations will be on display in an interactive “science fair” format. We’ll be demonstrating a variety of medical devices, mobile applications, software IT innovations, wearables and bioengineering innovations. It’s free and open to the public.

The event is hosted by Boston Children’s Innovation Acceleration Program and Technology & Innovation Development Office, from 2 to 4 p.m., followed by networking time (4 to 5 p.m.).

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Bringing gaming to mental health: My one-minute pitch at SXSW

Neuro'motion cofounders (L-R): Gonzalez-Heydrich, Kahn, Ducharme
Neuro’motion cofounders (L-R): Gonzalez-Heydrich, Kahn, Ducharme

Jason Kahn, PhD, is a co-founder of Neuro’motion, a research associate at Boston Children’s Hospital, and a part-time instructor at Harvard Medical School.

Earlier this month, I traveled to SXSW Interactive 2015 to introduce my company, Neuro’motion. We build mobile video games and toys to build emotional strength in children, improve access to mental health care and provide a drug-free alternative for behavioral health. We were born from research at Boston Children’s Hospital and our mission is to get our games into as many people’s hands as possible.

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What we’ve been reading: Week of March 30, 2015

shutterstock_175074977Bubble wrap used for cheap blood and bacteria tests (New Scientist)
Snap, crackle, pop are the familiar sounds of bubble wrap. According to George Whitesides at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, the cheap packing material may be popping up in the near future as a diagnostic tool, replacing costlier 96-well plates.

Nearly half of all pre-schoolers with ADHD are on medication (Washington Post)
The American Academy of Pediatrics calls for children under 6 with ADHD to engage in behavioral therapy before taking medication. Yet according to a national survey published in the Journal of Pediatrics, nearly half of preschool-aged children are on medication for the condition, and more than a fifth were receiving neither of the recommended therapies.

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Show me the money: Reimbursement for medical innovations

medical device reimbursementDevice developers tend to focus on the FDA approval process—PMAs and 510(k) clearances—while overlooking another major challenge: getting insurers to cover the device. Before approaching investors, and certainly before doing any studies, keep payers in mind, advises Maren Anderson, president of MDA Consulting, Inc., which specializes in reimbursement planning.

In the old days, doctors prescribed, and insurers paid. Under health care reform, that’s changed, says Anderson.

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