Stories about: Devices

Pediatric innovators showcase highlights inventions

Innovators Showcase Boston Children's HospitalSome great inventions were on view this week at the second annual Boston Children’s Hospital Innovators Showcase. Hosted by the hospital’s Innovation Acceleration Program and Technology & Innovation Development Office, the event featured everything from virtual reality goggles with gesture control to biomedical technologies. Below are a few new projects that caught Vector’s eye (expect to hear more about them in the coming months), a kid-friendly interview about the SimLab and list of inventions kids themselves would like to see. (Photos by Katherine Cohen except as noted)

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BabySee: Mobile app lets you see through an infant’s eyes

David Hunter, MD, PhD, chief of Ophthalmology at Boston Children’s Hospital, gets a lot of questions from parents, but the number one question is: “What can my baby see?”

That depends. How old is the baby?

Five days after birth, she might see something like the image at left; at 3 months, the image at right:

BabySee 5 days and 3 mos

At 6 months and 9 months, there’s increasing color and resolution:

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What we’ve been reading: Week of April 6, 2015

What we've been readingExome sequencing comes to the clinic (JAMA)
An approachable and thorough summary of the growing trend, describing the ways in which sequencing can help provide a diagnosis, the diagnostic yield (as high as 40 percent or more, depending on the population), how often the results have changed treatment decisions and the question of who pays.

Who Owns CRISPR? (The Scientist)
Excellent coverage of the escalating patent scramble for genome editing.

Doctors Make House Calls On Tablets Carried By Houston Firefighters (NPR)
Interesting use of telemedicine in Houston, where many people call 911 in non-emergency situations. EMTs carry tablets, and can have callers chat with a physician on a video app, avoiding the need to take them to the ED.

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Boston Children’s to host second annual Innovators’ Showcase

Ten or more monitors keep track of every child in the ICU. How can clinicians manage all the data they provide?  Surgical Sam beating heart pediatric trainer mannequin simulation Simulator Program The Chamberlain GroupA prototype of the warming pad. The white color indicates that the pad's "phase-change" material is in its solid state. (Courtesy of Anne Hansen)Silk worms could create tissues needed for urinary tract reconstruction.

 

(Clockwise from top: T3, Surgical Sam, non-electric baby warmer, silk-based organ reconstruction)

Next week—on April 15—Boston-area visitors can sample inventions and technologies from around Boston Children’s Hospital, some in development and some already in use. More than 20 medical innovations will be on display in an interactive “science fair” format. We’ll be demonstrating a variety of medical devices, mobile applications, software IT innovations, wearables and bioengineering innovations. It’s free and open to the public.

The event is hosted by Boston Children’s Innovation Acceleration Program and Technology & Innovation Development Office, from 2 to 4 p.m., followed by networking time (4 to 5 p.m.).

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Bringing gaming to mental health: My one-minute pitch at SXSW

Neuro'motion cofounders (L-R): Gonzalez-Heydrich, Kahn, Ducharme
Neuro’motion cofounders (L-R): Gonzalez-Heydrich, Kahn, Ducharme

Jason Kahn, PhD, is a co-founder of Neuro’motion, a research associate at Boston Children’s Hospital, and a part-time instructor at Harvard Medical School.

Earlier this month, I traveled to SXSW Interactive 2015 to introduce my company, Neuro’motion. We build mobile video games and toys to build emotional strength in children, improve access to mental health care and provide a drug-free alternative for behavioral health. We were born from research at Boston Children’s Hospital and our mission is to get our games into as many people’s hands as possible.

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What we’ve been reading: Week of March 30, 2015

shutterstock_175074977Bubble wrap used for cheap blood and bacteria tests (New Scientist)
Snap, crackle, pop are the familiar sounds of bubble wrap. According to George Whitesides at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, the cheap packing material may be popping up in the near future as a diagnostic tool, replacing costlier 96-well plates.

Nearly half of all pre-schoolers with ADHD are on medication (Washington Post)
The American Academy of Pediatrics calls for children under 6 with ADHD to engage in behavioral therapy before taking medication. Yet according to a national survey published in the Journal of Pediatrics, nearly half of preschool-aged children are on medication for the condition, and more than a fifth were receiving neither of the recommended therapies.

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Show me the money: Reimbursement for medical innovations

medical device reimbursementDevice developers tend to focus on the FDA approval process—PMAs and 510(k) clearances—while overlooking another major challenge: getting insurers to cover the device. Before approaching investors, and certainly before doing any studies, keep payers in mind, advises Maren Anderson, president of MDA Consulting, Inc., which specializes in reimbursement planning.

In the old days, doctors prescribed, and insurers paid. Under health care reform, that’s changed, says Anderson.

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A biomarker for Rett syndrome: Measuring hand movements

Rett syndrome stereotypies bracelet Q-sensor curveRett syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting mostly girls, takes away the ability to speak, and this makes the condition hard to reliably measure and assess. But children with Rett syndrome also display distinctive hand movements or stereotypies, including hand wringing, clasping and other repetitive hand movements, visible in many of these videos. With help from a grant from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation Acceleration Program, researchers are transforming these hand movements into an assessment tool.

Until now, there has been no quantitative measure for monitoring Rett hand movements. Adapting commercially available wearable sensor technology, biomedical engineering researcher Heather O’Leary has created a bracelet-like device not unlike Fitbit, another wearable accelerometer used to monitor exercise activity levels.

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CareAline: A mother’s road to SXSW

The CareAline wrap, modeled by Lochlan Fitzgerald
The CareAline wrap, modeled by Lochlan Fitzgerald. Below, the CareAline sleeve.

Our daughter, Saoirse, was diagnosed with cancer when she was 11 months old. Her care, safety and comfort were our first priorities. When she had a PICC line and later a central line placed to infuse drugs and fluids, we saw a need for a better way to keep these lines safe and secure without using skin-damaging tape and irritating mesh netting. Saoirse was tugging at her lines and trying to pull off the tape, so I handmade a fabric sleeve for her PICC line and a chest wrap for her central line, and she went back to playing and being a kid.

Initially we figured that would be the end of it.

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SXSW Interactive 2015: Our future selves, a maturing health tech industry and why failing is productive

SXSW Impact Pediatric HealthJudy Wang, MS, is a program manager in the Telehealth Program at Boston Children’s Hospital.

In 2012, when I attended the South by Southwest (SXSW) Interactive conference for the first time, health tech was still an emerging field. It was the first year the world’s leading conference for emerging technology and digital creativity made any effort to include health tech programming, and the first time its Accelerator pitch event included a category for health tech startups.

Only three years later, SXSW Interactive (March 13­–17, 2015) has grown to include almost 50 events related to health and medical technologies. Martine Rothblatt, CEO of the biotech company United Therapeutics, gave a keynote titled “AI, Immortality and the Future of Selves” that was both inspiring and provocative. She spoke to a world in which our 24/7 selves are increasingly being captured digitally. Audience questions captured by Twitter pondered the ethical implications of what Rothblatt called “mind clones”: future mechanical beings digitally programmed with our mannerisms, habits and memories.

This year also featured the Impact Pediatric Health pitch competition, captured in this Storify.

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