Stories about: Innovators’ stories

Solving puzzles with Cigall Kadoch

Cigali Kadoch-Rubiks cube-croppedGrowing up in the San Francisco area, Cigall Kadoch, PhD, had a passion for puzzles. The daughter of a Moroccan-born, Israeli-raised father and a mother from Michigan who together developed an interior design business, Kadoch excelled in school and pretty much everything else. Above all, she loved to solve brain-teasers.

For Kadoch, the Rubik’s cube represents a love of puzzles, as well as the structure of the protein complexes she studies in her research at the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. Dana-Farber Chief of Staff Stephen Sallan, MD, describes her as “addicted to discovery.”

In high school, however, Kadoch came up against a problem that defied solution. Breast cancer took the life of a beloved family caretaker who had nurtured her interests in science and nature. She knew little about cancer except that it took lives far too early.

“I was deeply saddened and very frustrated at my lack of understanding of what had happened,” recalls Kadoch. “I thought to myself, cancer is a puzzle that isn’t solved, let alone even well-defined, and I want to try. As naïve a statement as that was, it was a defining moment—one which I never could have predicted would actually shape my life’s efforts.”

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My work, my life, my innovations: Bruce Zetter, PhD

Though Bruce Zetter, PhD, Charles Nowiszewski Professor of Cancer Biology in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Department of Surgery, has had a lifelong passion for science, he once toyed with an alternate career—as an actor. But he stuck with his love for science and pursued a career in academic medicine. Countless patients, students, business partners and mentees have benefitted from that decision.

Read on to sort through a few artifacts from Zetter’s work and life, and if you want to hear more from him, make plans to attend Boston Children’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2015,  Nov. 9 + 10, where Zetter will be the emcee for the third year.

 

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My work, my life: John Brownstein, PhD

Boston Children’s Hospital’s new chief innovation officer, John Brownstein, PhD, is an epidemiologist by training and a founding father of the growing field of digital epidemiology—the use of digital (especially social and mobile) data from a variety of sources to detect and track disease and promote health. As co-founder of HealthMap and director of the Computational Epidemiology Group in the hospital’s Computational Health Informatics Program, he infuses his work into many aspects of his life—along with a healthy helping of hot sauce.

Hover over the icons in the photo below to learn about the things in Brownstein’s phone, office and life that keep him going.

Brownstein will be one of four panelists discussing Patient Engagement in a Big Data World at Boston Children’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2015. Learn more about the summit and register to attend.

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Daniel Kohane, MD, PhD, at TEDMED: “Smart vehicles for safer medications”

“The drugs that I take don’t just go to the places in my body they’re supposed to go to do the things they do. They actually go everywhere. And what they do in those other places can be whatever.”

With those words, Daniel Kohane, MD, PhD—director of the Laboratory for Biomaterials and Drug Delivery at Boston Children’s Hospital—launched into a TEDMED talk about technologies that get drugs to where they need to go with much greater precision, like:

“Progress in this field is limited only by the imagination of the investigators and, to some degree, by reality,” says Kohane, who also sees patients in Boston Children’s Department of Critical Care Medicine. “You can achieve really big things by thinking really small.”

Click the image above to watch his whole talk.

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Risk mitigation made easy: Apps make hospital safety proactive

A environmental health & safety hospital hot zone
A hospital ‘hot zone’

Hospitals are among the most hazardous workplaces in the U.S. In 2011, according to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 253,700 accidents were reported, an average of 6.8 work-related injuries for every 100 full-time employees. Rates of injuries reported to OSHA are decreasing in all industries except for hospitals, whose rates are double the average.

Could a set of digital apps help identify and reduce occupational and environmental risks in a quick and efficient manner? That is what Nick Kielbania, MS, CSP, CHMM, director of Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) and Adrian Hudson, PhD, MCompSc, principal software architect at Boston Children’s Hospital, set out to create.

Their web-based solution, enabled for Apple and Android devices, is called the BCH Environmental Health and Safety Application Suite. Designed to aid hospital emergency response, safety and support services, the applications encompass fire, clinical, research, construction and environmental safety, with additional apps for on-call and administrative personnel.

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MRI-powered ‘millirobots’ could swim around the body, drive needles, puncture tissues

(noppasit TH/Shutterstock)
(noppasit TH/Shutterstock)

MRI is a staple of surgical imaging, but it has the potential to do much more than take pictures. In 2011, bioengineer Pierre Dupont, PhD, and colleagues demonstrated that an MRI machine’s magnetic field could power a motor strong enough to control a robotic instrument, in this case driving a needle into an organ to do a biopsy.

But Dupont, head of the Pediatric Cardiac Bioengineering Lab at Boston Children’s Hospital, wants to go further. “We had this idea, admittedly fanciful: What if you could swim robots through the body?” he says. “If you could inject something systemically and steer it to just hit your target, that would be a cool application.”

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Power to the people: Citizen science meets precision medicine for rare disease

At this recent GoldLab Symposium presentation in Colorado, parent Matt Might shows how it’s done.

People credit rapid next-generation gene sequencing for the increased pace of medical discovery. But patients and their families—especially those with rare or undiagnosed conditions—are emerging as the true engines of precision medicine. Racing against the clock to save their children, parents are building databanks, connecting scientific dots and fueling therapeutic advances that could otherwise take a decade or more to happen.

“There’s a culture shift,” said Isaac Kohane, MD, PhD, chair of Harvard Medical School’s Department of Biomedical Informatics (DBMI), which hosted a conference titled Precision Medicine 2015: Patient Driven in late June. “A culture shift where patients feel empowered morally and intellectually to lead in precision medicine research and delivery.”

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Sun Hur, PhD: Overcoming barriers to reveal innate immunity’s secrets

Self-discovery is a theme that unites Sun Hur’s life and work. Growing up with a passion for physics, Hur pursued a scientific career in chemistry before launching her own research group in biology. Today, Hur, an investigator in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine (PCMM), uses her considerable intellectual gifts to uncover how the immune system distinguishes self from non-self.

In the video above, produced by the Vilcek Foundation (which honors and supports foreign-born scientists and artists who have made outstanding contributions to society in the United States), Hur talks about her personal and scientific journey since coming to the U.S. from her native South Korea in 2000. Overcoming cultural and language barriers, she has turned her childhood fascination with order and chaos toward exploring how the innate immune system recognizes invaders, in particular disease-causing viruses that generate a double-stranded RNA during replication.

These studies, which could open doors to new treatments for cancer and inflammatory diseases, recently garnered her the Vilcek’s 2015 Prize for Creative Promise in Biomedical Science.

Adapted from announcements originally published by the Vilcek Foundation and the PCMM.

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My work, my life: Michael J. Docktor, MD

Michael J. Docktor, MD, Boston Children’s Hospital’s clinical director of Innovation and director of Clinical Mobile Solutions, is also a practicing gastroenterologist, a proud father of two and a passionate mobile-and-digital health trailblazer. An original co-founder of Hacking Pediatrics, Docktor’s goal is to bridge the gap between entrepreneurship, consumer technology, design and clinical pain points.

Hover over the images and icons in the photo below to learn more about Docktor’s professional and personal life, favorite gadgets and more.

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My work, my life: Gena Koufos, RN, MS, MBA

Gena Koufos, RN, MS, MBA, is program manager in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation Acceleration Program. Her role entails designing new programs to support innovation acceleration across the institution. She offers resources and strategic guidance to cultivate and advance early stage innovators through product development and care delivery projects.

Learn more about the connection between nursing and innovation by exploring Koufos’ work and life. Click on the images and icons in the photo below to see what makes Koufos tick.

Explore the Innovation Acceleration Program at Boston Children’s.
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