Stories about: Uncategorized

Stuart Orkin honored for his lifetime research on blood development

Presenter Bill Evans, IBM Watson Health and Stuart H. Orkin, MD

When colleagues describe Stuart H. Orkin, MD, associate chief of hematology/oncology at Boston Children’s Hospital and chair of pediatric oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the words “immeasurable,” “vanguard” and “mentor” quickly roll off the tongue.

In honor of his 35-year career and commitment to blood cell research, Boston Children’s Hospital presented Orkin with the 2015 Lifetime Impact Award, during Boston Children’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit held this week. The award recognizes a clinician and/or researcher who has significantly impacted pediatric care through practice-changing innovations or discoveries and made extraordinary and sustained leadership contributions in health care throughout his or her career.

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My work, my life, my innovations: Anne Hansen, MD, MPH

If these walls could talk …

The walls of Anne Hansen’s office tell a story. The main character, medical director of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Boston Children’s Hospital, is an innovator, a global citizen and respected neonatologist. Her life and work has benefitted newborns and parents, medical trainees and colleagues around the world.

Read more about her life, work and innovations by hovering over the objects that surround her every day.


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My work, my life, my innovations: Jean Connor, PhD, RN, CPNP

Stepping into Dr. Jean Connor’s office, the first thing you notice is color. So much color. Bella, Connor’s 9-year-old daughter, has decorated the space with handmade inspirational signs and artwork that explode with vibrant energy. “That’s how I innovate,” says Connor. “I like having all that positive energy around me.”

Connor, who has her PhD in nursing, directs nursing research at the Boston Children’s Heart Center. She was the first nurse to complete her post-doc at the Harvard School of Public Health and received a Champions in Healthcare award from the Boston Business Journal in 2012. Connor’s work translates industry research into actionable lessons and innovations that improve care at the bedside. In 2009, she developed a nursing acuity measurement tool called CAMEO (Complexity Assessment and Monitoring to Ensure Optimal Outcomes) that has since been validated to measure nursing workload across all pediatric and neonatal settings in the United States.

“I absolutely love my job,” Connor says. “I never thought I’d leave the bedside, but I feel like I’m impacting what happens at the bedside. We each have our ability to contribute to make the best possible experience for patients and families.”

Scroll over the items around Dr. Connor’s office to learn more about what inspires her.

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My work, my life, my innovations: Katherine Janeway, MD

“It’s all about the patients,” says Katherine Janeway, MD, when asked about the motivations behind her efforts to bring precision medicine to pediatric oncology. But it’s more than that; the drive to combine science and care is in her blood. A solid tumor specialist and cancer genomics researcher at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Janeway is the sixth generation of her family to choose a scientific or medical path—not just as a career, but also as a form of service.

Janeway will bring her patient-centered perspective to the Cancer Genomics + Care panel at Boston Children’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2015. Read more about her life, work and innovations—and inspirations—by hovering over the objects that surround her everyday.

Learn more about the Boston Children’s summit and register to attend.

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My work, my life, my innovations: Ken Mandl, MD, MPH

Ken Mandl, MD, MPH, director of the Boston Children’s Hospital Computational Health Informatics Program, is used to seeing the world through a different lens. In high school, he began clicking photographs with his camera and developing them in a darkroom in his basement. Now, he frames subjects through the lens of epidemiology and informatics—driving discovery and care transformation through big data, apps and large-scale federated research networks.

Mandl will be one of four panelists discussing The Future of Pediatric Precision Medicine at Boston Children’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2015. Read more about his life, work and innovations by hovering over the objects that surround him everyday.

Learn more about the Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2015 and register to attend.

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The MERS death rate in Saudi Arabia is double that in South Korea. Why?

map South Korea Saudi Arabia MERS
(Wikimedia Commons)

The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) virus outbreak in South Korea is essentially over. (Not so in Saudi Arabia, where the virus first emerged, though—authorities there have reported a major uptick in new MERS cases in recent days.) And while the country gets back on its feet, some interesting data are starting to come out, especially about the outbreak’s case fatality rate (CFR; the percent of patients infected with the virus who died from it).

John Brownstein, PhD, and Maimuna Majumder, MPH, from Boston Children’s HealthMap team just reported in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases that MERS’ CFR in South Korea (22 percent) is fully half that seen in Saudi Arabia (44 percent).

This infographic about Brownstein and Majumder’s MERS paper gives a snapshot of the data the analyzed, and what they think those data mean:

MERS virus South Korea Saudi Arabia infographic

Read Brownstein and Majumder’s analysis and check out Boston Children’s Hospital’s news release about the MERS paper.

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Hillary Savoie: Parents as citizen scientists

The author with 3-year-old Esmé at their home in New York. (Tracey Buyce Photography)

In my last post I explained the genetic testing process that led to my daughter Esmé receiving results of two mutations of unknown significance. One, on the gene PCDH19, was discovered in 2012 with the GeneDx infantile epilepsy panel. The other, on SCN8A, was found with whole exome sequencing, also through GeneDx, in 2014.

When we received the SCN8A result, I was fascinated by the notion that it would have been included in our original epilepsy panel had we only waited a handful of months. In fact, in the time since Esmé’s original test in 2012, almost 20 new genes have been added to the GeneDx Infantile Epilepsy panel.

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My work, my life, my innovations: Bruce Zetter, PhD

Though Bruce Zetter, PhD, Charles Nowiszewski Professor of Cancer Biology in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Department of Surgery, has had a lifelong passion for science, he once toyed with an alternate career—as an actor. But he stuck with his love for science and pursued a career in academic medicine. Countless patients, students, business partners and mentees have benefitted from that decision.

Read on to sort through a few artifacts from Zetter’s work and life, and if you want to hear more from him, make plans to attend Boston Children’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2015,  Nov. 9 + 10, where Zetter will be the emcee for the third year.


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Detecting Ebola within minutes: A treatment and containment game changer


Tests for detecting Ebola in the blood can take anywhere from 12 hours to four days to yield results. But a recent study published in The Lancet reveals that a new point-of-care test can accurately determine results in mere minutes—another step toward potentially controlling the spread of Ebola.

Nira Pollock, MD, PhD, senior author of the paper and associate medical director of the Infectious Diseases Diagnostic Laboratory at Boston Children’s Hospital, along with researchers from Harvard Medical School and Partners In Health, showed that a commercially developed rapid diagnostic test (RDT), called the Corgenix ReEBOV Antigen Rapid Test kit, was as sensitive as a conventional laboratory-based method used for clinical testing during the recent outbreak in Sierra Leone.

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How our neutrophils might sabotage wound healing in diabetes

When you get a cut or a scrape, your body jumps into action, mobilizing a complicated array of cells and factors to stem bleeding, keep the wound bacteria-free and launch the healing process.

For most of us, that process is complete in a couple of weeks. But for many people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, delayed wound healing can have permanent consequences. For example, between 15 and 25 percent of diabetes patients develop chronic foot ulcers. Those ulcers are the root cause of roughly two-thirds of lower limb amputations related to diabetes.

Why don’t these wounds close? Blame a perfect storm of diabetic complications, such as reduced blood flow, neuropathy and impaired signaling between cells. According to research by Denisa Wagner, PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, a poorly understood feature of our immune system’s neutrophils may be one more ingredient in the storm.

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