Stress-induced stem cells debunked: The final word on STAP

In early 2014, controversy erupted when two papers in Nature indicated that exposing ordinary cells to stress—an acid bath or mechanical stress—could quickly and efficiently turn them into pluripotent stem cells, capable of developing into virtually all the tissues in the body.

The technique, called “stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency,” or STAP, was lauded for its simplicity compared to other methods like nuclear transfer into egg cells or cellular reprogramming with a set of transcription factors.

Not so fast.

Six months later, the papers were retracted. And this week in Nature, a team led by George Q. Daley, MD, PhD, director of the Stem Cell Transplantation Program at Boston Children’s Hospital, and Peter Park, PhD, head of the Computational Genomics Group at Harvard Medical School (HMS) details what went wrong. In a companion paper, the Daley Lab provides a roadmap for verifying a cell’s pluripotent status.

Read the full story on the HMS website.