A filtration technology poised to cure sepsis

Sepsis is the most common cause of death in infants and children worldwide, and its incidence is increasing. Damage is caused not only by the bloodstream infection itself but by the systemic inflammatory cascade it triggers — which has been difficult to control without also causing long-lasting immune suppression. During a five-minute Ignite Talk at the 2015 Boston Children’s Hospital Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards, Brian McAlvin, MD, a critical care intensivist at Boston Children’s Hospital, introduced the audience to a filtration technology that could cure systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS).

SIRS, McAlvin noted, is the underlying mechanism for a variety of diseases, not just sepsis. His invention, the Antibody Modified Conduit, is essentially a small tube with antibodies painted on the inner surface that recognize and remove the inflammatory agents. “This technology allows us to choose the inflammatory molecules in the circulation,” says McAlvin, “and take them out of the blood as the condition evolves by changing the antibody that’s present.”

The talk won the pitch competition, earning McAlvin an Apple watch, a one-on-one mentoring session with an influential venture capitalist and a meet-and-greet with Boston Children’s innovation acceleration team, VCs and other stakeholders.

See more posts and videos from the Global Pediatric Innovation Summit.