Fertility preservation for children with cancer: What are the options?

sperm_and_egg__SebastianKaulitzki_shutterstock_1762515_800x500_Notes

More than 75 percent of children diagnosed with cancer are surviving into adulthood, leaving more and more parents to wonder: Will my child be able to have children down the road?

They’re right to be concerned. The cancer treatments that are so effective at saving children’s lives can themselves cause a host of problems that don’t manifest until years later. These late effects include particularly harsh impacts on fertility.

On our sister blog Notes, urologist Richard Yu, MD, PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital and fertility specialist Elizabeth Ginsberg, MD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital outline where the science of fertility preservation is going.

“It may take 15 or 20 years to develop the techniques to help a child who is 8 years old now,” notes Yu. “But if you don’t preserve something now, you run the risk of not being able to do anything for them later, which is where we are now with a large number of adults who survived childhood cancer.”

Read more about fertility preservation and childhood cancer on Notes.