Search Results for: sepsis

Self-sacrificing cells hold clues to improving treatment of MRSA, sepsis

Over the last several years, scientists have made great headway in our understanding of how self-sabotaging immune cells play a role in our ability to fight infection. So far, we know that when white blood cells called neutrophils are triggered by bacterial infection, they self-combust and eject their own DNA strands outward like spider webs. Sacrificing…

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Blood filtration device could provide personalized care for sepsis

Cytokines are small proteins produced by the body’s cells that have a big impact on our immune system. Researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital believe that modulating their presence in our bodies could be the key to improving outcomes in life-threatening cases of trauma, hemorrhage and many other conditions including sepsis, which alone impacts nearly one…

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

News Note: Modeling sepsis better to find a cure faster

Sepsis, or blood poisoning, occurs when the body’s response to infection damages its own tissues, leading to organ failure. It is the most common cause of death in people who have been hospitalized, yet no new therapies have been developed in the last 30 years. Many treatments that have prevented death in animal experiments have…

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

When antibiotics fail: A potential new angle on severe bacterial infection and sepsis

Bacterial infections that don’t respond to antibiotics are of rising concern. And so is sepsis — the immune system’s last-ditch, failed attack on infection that ends up being lethal itself. Sepsis is the largest killer of newborns and children worldwide and, in the U.S. alone, kills a quarter of a million people each year. Like…

Read Full Story | 1 Comment | Leave a Comment

A filtration technology poised to cure sepsis

Sepsis is the most common cause of death in infants and children worldwide, and its incidence is increasing. Damage is caused not only by the bloodstream infection itself but by the systemic inflammatory cascade it triggers — which has been difficult to control without also causing long-lasting immune suppression. During a five-minute Ignite Talk at…

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Of magnets and bacteria: Filtering the blood of patients with sepsis

There’s no other way to say it: sepsis is a horrible disease. It typically starts with a runaway bacterial infection in the blood, followed by a runaway immune response that severely damages the body it’s trying to save. The results: shock, multiple organ failure and—in between 210,000 and 375,000 people in the United States alone…

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Modeling sepsis in newborns: toward better detection and treatment

Sepsis, or bacterial infection of the bloodstream, is a grave threat to premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) who have catheters and intravenous lines. Even when antibiotics clear the infection itself, the inflammation that it causes can do just as much damage. Not only can sepsis and the resulting inflammation interfere with…

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Study sounds another warning about proton pump inhibitors

A new study adds to growing concerns about a class of drugs frequently prescribed to suppress stomach acid in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Previous research has linked the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) to an increased risk of various pulmonary and gastrointestinal infections in both adults and children. Patients treated with PPIs…

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Six technologies we backed in 2017

Boston Children’s Hospital’s Technology Development Fund (TDF) to designed to transform early-stage academic technologies into validated, high-impact opportunities for licensees and investors. Since 2009, the hospital has committed $7.6 million to support 76 promising technologies, from therapeutics, diagnostics, medical devices and vaccines to regenerative medicine and healthcare IT projects. The TDF also assists with strategic planning, intellectual…

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

How do cells release IL-1? The answer packs a punch, and could enable better vaccines

Interleukin-1 (IL-1), first described in 1984, is the original, highly potent member of the large family of cellular signaling molecules called cytokines that regulate immune responses and inflammation. It’s a key part of our immune response to infections, and also plays a role in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Several widely used anti-inflammatory drugs, such as…

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment