Search Results for: strabismus

Tracking the elusive genes that cause strabismus

Strabismus is a common condition in which the eyes do not align properly, turning inward, outward, upward or downward. Two to four percent of children have some form of it. Some cases can be treated with glasses or eye patching; other cases require eye muscle surgery. But the treatments don’t address the root causes of…

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StrabisPIX: Assessing strabismus from patients’ smartphone photos

New smartphone-based diagnostic tools are enabling consumers to take their temperatures, diagnose simple skin conditions and much more. As advanced smartphone imaging puts more and more capabilities in patients’ hands, it’s no surprise that clinicians and numerous digital health startups are leveraging them. As a case in point, the Department of Ophthalmology and the Innovation…

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Can virtual reality headsets save vision in people with lazy eye?

Three to five percent of the population has amblyopia, a.k.a. lazy eye, in which a healthy eye never “learns” to see because isn’t used. This usually happens because of a focusing problem or subtle misalignment of that eye. The brain learns to ignore input from that eye, and unless this is noticed early, it weakens and can…

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Amblyopia detection: A long climb to market for the Pediatric Vision Scanner

David Hunter, MD, PhD, ophthalmologist-in-chief at Boston Children’s Hospital, is also developer of StrabisPix and BabySee. The Pediatric Vision Scanner received FDA marketing clearance last month. As a pediatric ophthalmologist, I do my best to assure that every young patient I examine will have a lifetime of perfect sight. The condition that I battle most…

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Ophthalmologist finds another way to be a rock star

From a series on researchers and innovators at Boston Children’s Hospital. David G. Hunter, MD, PhD, dreamed of a career as a rock star. Instead, he became Boston Children’s Hospital’s ophthalmologist-in-chief and invented the Pediatric Vision Scanner. The device, designed for use by pediatricians, detects amblyopia or “lazy eye,” the leading cause of vision loss…

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Alzheimer’s drugs for “lazy eye”?

When my parents told me I should walk around with my right eye patched like a pirate—on regular days, not just Halloween—I wondered if they were joking. They weren’t: those really were the doctor’s orders. As a child, I had amblyopia, or “lazy eye”: my left eye had much poorer vision than my right eye….

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