Author: Hillary Savoie

Hillary Savoie: Parents as citizen scientists

hillary-and-esme
The author with 3-year-old Esmé at their home in New York. (Tracey Buyce Photography)

In my last post I explained the genetic testing process that led to my daughter Esmé receiving results of two mutations of unknown significance. One, on the gene PCDH19, was discovered in 2012 with the GeneDx infantile epilepsy panel. The other, on SCN8A, was found with whole exome sequencing, also through GeneDx, in 2014.

When we received the SCN8A result, I was fascinated by the notion that it would have been included in our original epilepsy panel had we only waited a handful of months. In fact, in the time since Esmé’s original test in 2012, almost 20 new genes have been added to the GeneDx Infantile Epilepsy panel.

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When your child isn’t just rare, but probably one of a kind

Savoie at home with 4-year-old Esmé in New York.
Savoie at home with 4-year-old Esmé in New York.

Hillary Savoie, PhD, founder and director of The Cute Syndrome Foundation, is author of Around And Into The Unknown, chronicling her family’s journey to find a diagnosis for Esmé, and Whoosh, about coming to terms with Esmé’s early medical complications.

I think my daughter Esmé is extraordinarily unique—from her tiny pudgy feet that she likes to stuff in her mouth to her beautifully lashed blue eyes and outrageously untamed hair. It’s a mom thing. I guess it is a symptom of loving another person more than life itself.

But my daughter is also unusual in a more scientific way: in her genes. 

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