Author: Jessica Cerretani

Study sounds another warning about proton pump inhibitors

child crying while feeding oropharyngeal dysphagia
Toddlers with oropharyngeal dysphagia who were treated with a PPI had a nearly doubled hospitalization rate. (IMAGE: ADOBE STOCK)

A new study adds to growing concerns about a class of drugs frequently prescribed to suppress stomach acid in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Previous research has linked the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) to an increased risk of various pulmonary and gastrointestinal infections in both adults and children. Patients treated with PPIs are also at higher risk for upper respiratory infections, pneumonia and sepsis.

A new study, published last week in JAMA Otolaryngologysuggests that use of PPIs may also raise the risk of hospitalization of infants and children with oropharyngeal dysphagia, a common swallowing disorder. The study was led by Rachel Rosen, MD, MPH and Daniel Duncan, MD at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Aerodigestive Center.

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Vessel-lengthening technique offers game change for a rare vascular condition

TESLA concept for midaortic syndrome

Tissue expanders — small balloons that can be filled with saline solution or other fluids to grow skin — have long been used in plastic surgery, most commonly breast reconstruction. They’re based on the simple idea that the surrounding skin will stretch as the device expands over time. That extra skin can then help repair injuries or congenital anomalies or accommodate implants.

Now, a novel approach extends tissue expansion to blood vessels. It is transforming the way that surgeons treat a rare but serious condition called midaortic syndrome, report Heung Bae Kim, MD, Khashayar Vakili, MD and their colleagues at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Midaortic syndrome occurs when the middle section of the aorta is narrowed and typically affects children and young adults. It can cause severe hypertension and can be life-threatening if left untreated. The surgical approach to this condition would be to replace the damaged portion of the aorta with nearby healthy blood vessels. However, this usually isn’t possible because these vessels tend to be too short to adequately fill in.

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Bypassing a narrowed midaorta with a living, growing graft

Midaortic syndrome is marked by narrowing of the middle section of the aorta.

By the time he arrived at Boston Children’s Hospital, the 6-month-old boy was near death from midaortic syndrome — a rare but life-threatening condition marked by narrowing of the middle section of the aorta, the largest artery in the body. It had left him with severe hypertension, acute kidney injury and heart failure. As cardiologists worked to stabilize him, the surgical team weighed the options.

With diminished blood flow to the chest, abdomen and lower limbs, a significant number of people with untreated midaortic syndrome die from complications by age 40. The condition can be treated surgically, traditionally with a prosthetic graft made from synthetic material to perform an aortic bypass. But synthetic grafts can pose a number of challenges in children.

“Synthetic grafts don’t grow with the patient, which means that multiple surgeries may be necessary through the years to ensure appropriate graft size,” explains nephrologist Michael Ferguson, MD, who was a member of this patient’s care team. “Artificial grafts also carry a higher risk of thrombosis and infection.”

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Robot-enhanced neurosurgery for nimbler seizure mapping

implanting electrodes for seizure monitoring, with robotic assistance
Scellig Stone and Joseph Madsen in surgery with the robot.

Head shaved, a little boy rests on the operating table, deep under anesthesia. His parents have brought him to Boston Children’s Hospital in hopes of determining the cause of his seizures. Now, neurosurgeons Scellig Stone, MD, PhD, Joseph Madsen, MD, and their colleagues in the Epilepsy Center are performing a procedure designed to monitor seizure activity in the 3-year-old’s brain.

But as the team members crowd around the table, they’re not alone. With the push of a button, a large robotic arm rotates and lowers right next to the boy’s head, helping the physicians pinpoint the precise location to drill. “This is a real game-changer,” murmurs one of the clinicians observing the surgery. “It’s going to transform the way we practice.”

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Could fecal transplants heal Crohn’s and colitis in children? Two trials are set to find out

two trials test fecal transplant in Crohn's and colitis in children

Could an exciting potential treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) be found in the gastrointestinal tract itself? That’s the theory behind a pair of new studies by Stacy A. Kahn, MD, which will investigate the potential role of fecal microbial transplant (FMT) in the treatment of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis in children.

In IBD, the immune system attacks healthy cells in the digestive tract, triggering symptoms such as abdominal pain, fatigue, poor growth and bloody diarrhea. Children with IBD can also experience problems elsewhere in the body, including joint pain, liver disorders and eye inflammation.

Known colloquially as the “poop pill,” or “stool transplant,” FMT harnesses growing knowledge about the gut microbiota, the collection of bacteria and other microbes that populate our GI tract.

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