Author: Kat J. McAlpine

Seeking a way to keep organs young

Images of mouse hearts with fibrosis
These mouse hearts show differing levels of fibrosis (blue) resulting from cardiac stress. New Boston Children’s Hospital research suggests certain therapies could prevent or reduce fibrosis, like we see in the center and right images.

The wear and tear of life takes a cumulative toll on our bodies. Our organs gradually stiffen through fibrosis, which is a process that deposits tough collagen in our body tissue. Fibrosis happens little by little, each time we experience illness or injury. Eventually, this causes our health to decline.

“As we age, we typically accumulate more fibrosis and our organs become dysfunctional,” says Denisa Wagner, PhD, the Edwin Cohn Professor of Pediatrics in the Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine and a member of the Division of Hematology/Oncology at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

Ironically, fibrosis can stem from our own immune system’s attempt to defend us during injury, stress-related illness, environmental factors and even common infections.

But a Boston Children’s team of scientists thinks preventative therapies could be on the horizon. A study by Wagner and her team, published recently by the Journal of Experimental Medicine, pinpoints a gene responsible for fibrosis and identifies some possible therapeutic solutions.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Soft robot could aid failing hearts by mimicking healthy cardiac muscle

heart-failure

Every year, about 2,100 people receive heart transplants in the U.S., while 5.7 million suffer from heart failure. Given the scarcity of available donor hearts, clinicians and biomedical engineers from Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard University have spent several years developing a mechanical alternative.

Their proof of concept is reported today in Science Translational Medicine: a soft robotic sleeve that is fitted around the heart, where it twists and compresses the heart’s chambers just like healthy cardiac muscle would do.

Heart failure occurs when one or both of the heart’s ventricles can no longer collect or pump blood effectively. Ventricular assist devices (VADs) are already used to sustain end-stage heart failure patients awaiting transplant, replacing the work of the ventricles through tubes that take blood out of the heart, send it through pumps or rotors and power it back into a patient’s bloodstream. But while VADs extend lives, they can cause complications.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Biological ‘programmers’ crack new code in stem cells

Stem cell colony Wyss Institute James Collins George Daley complexity
Researchers discovered many small nuances in pluripotency states of stem cells by subjecting the cells to various perturbations and then analyzing each individual cell to observe all the different reactions to developmental cues within a stem cell colony. (Credit: Wyss Institute at Harvard University)

Stem cells offer great potential in biomedical engineering because they’re pluripotent—meaning they can multiply indefinitely and develop into any of the hundreds of different kinds of cells and tissues in the body. But in trying to tap these cells’ creative potential, it has so far been hard to pinpoint the precise biological mechanisms and genetic makeups that dictate how stem cells diverge on the path to development.

Part of the challenge, according to James Collins, PhD, a core faculty member at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, is that not all stem cells are created the same. “Stem cell colonies contain much variability between individual cells. This has been considered somewhat problematic for developing predictive approaches in stem cell engineering,” he says.

But now, Collins and Boston Children’s Hospital’s George Q. Daley, MD, PhD, have used a new, very sensitive single-cell genetic profiling method to reveal how the variability in pluripotent stem cells runs way deeper than we thought.

While at first glimmer, it could appear this would make predictive stem cell engineering more difficult, it might actually present an opportunity to exert even more programmable control over stem cell differentiation and development than was originally envisioned. “What was previously considered problematic variability could actually be beneficial to our ability to precisely control stem cells,” says Collins.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment