Author: Marina Freytsis

For biomedicine startups, the road to commercialization is paved with mentors and winds through Boston

the road for biomedicine startups

Marina Freytsis, PhD, supports the Technology and Innovation Development Office (TIDO) at Boston Children’s Hospital in seeking industry partnerships for Boston Children’s technologies and intellectual property.

Last week, Boston Children’s Hospital’s Technology and Innovation Development Office (TIDO) had the privilege of hosting a Boston Biomedical Innovation Center (B-BIC) panel discussion on the path from academia to entrepreneurship. We heard from Jeffrey Arnold (an angel investor), Jonathan Thon (an academic-turned-CEO) and Pamela Silver (an entrepreneurial professor).

My top five takeaways for budding entrepreneurs:

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Prescriptions for accelerating neuroscience translation: Q&A with Mustafa Sahin, MD, PhD

Mustafa Sahin Translational Neuroscience CenterMustafa Sahin, MD, PhD, a neurologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, directs the Translational Neuroscience Center, which he founded several years ago to accelerate neuroscience research to the clinic. He also directs the hospital’s Translational Research Program. In this interview with Boston Children’s Technology and Innovation Development Office (TIDO), Sahin talks about his motivations as a clinician-scientist and how he works with industry partners to move discoveries forward.

What drives you as a scientist? 

What drives me as a scientist has changed over the course of my career. It was my fascination with experimentation that first got me interested in biology. In high school, I took vials of fruit flies to a radiation oncology department and tested the effects of radiation on the mutation rate. When I came to the U.S. to study biochemistry in college, I was drawn to the mysteries of the brain. While my PhD and postdoctoral work continued on very fundamental questions about how neurons connect to each other, advances in genetics and neuroscience allowed me to bring rigorous basic science approaches to clinical questions. So more and more, my science is driven by a need to bring treatments to the patients I see in the clinic. Fortunately, this is no longer a long-term, aspirational goal, but something within reach in my career.

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Teaching an old drug a new trick to treat an ultra-rare red-blood-cell disease

Failed sickle-cell drug learns a new trick: hereditary xerocytosis

The National Institutes of Health maintains a library of drugs, the Clinical Collection, that are safe for humans but failed in clinical trials or didn’t make it to the market for other reasons. These compounds, numbering 450 to date, are just sitting on the shelf, waiting for a researcher to identify a disease process they might treat.

Repurposing such drugs could potentially save the pharmaceutical industry time and money. Getting a new drug from R&D to market currently takes $2 to 3 billion and 13 to 15 years. In contrast, some estimate that repurposing a safe drug could cost just $300 million and take just 6.5 years.

Pfizer, one of the biggest pharma companies in the world, saw the appeal. It just launched SpringWorks Therapeutics, a mission-driven company dedicated to reviving shelved drugs to treat underserved diseases. In its pipeline are experimental therapies to treat four diseases that currently have no cure.

One of the earliest-stage candidates is senicapoc.

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