Author: Maureen McCarthy

Stuart Orkin honored for his lifetime research on blood development

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Presenter Bill Evans, IBM Watson Health and Stuart H. Orkin, MD

When colleagues describe Stuart H. Orkin, MD, associate chief of hematology/oncology at Boston Children’s Hospital and chair of pediatric oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the words “immeasurable,” “vanguard” and “mentor” quickly roll off the tongue.

In honor of his 35-year career and commitment to blood cell research, Boston Children’s Hospital presented Orkin with the 2015 Lifetime Impact Award, during Boston Children’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit held this week. The award recognizes a clinician and/or researcher who has significantly impacted pediatric care through practice-changing innovations or discoveries and made extraordinary and sustained leadership contributions in health care throughout his or her career.

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Hematologist Vijay Sankaran receives Boston Children’s Hospital Rising Star Award

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Before an audience of several hundred luncheon attendees, physician-scientist Vijay G. Sankaran, MD, PhD, received Boston Children’s Hospital’s 2015 Rising Star Award — recognizing the outstanding achievements of an up-and-coming innovator under the age of 45 in pediatric health care.

Sankaran, a board-certified pediatric hematologist/oncologist with Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, conducts innovative research on red blood cell disorders such as Diamond-Blackfan anemia, sickle cell disease and thalassemia.

The Rising Star Award and companion Lifetime Impact Award ceremony were held at the hospital’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards on November 10.

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My work, my life, my innovations: Salim Afshar, DMD, MD


By the time oral and maxillofacial surgeon Salim Afshar, DMD, MD, was 29 years old, he had acquired medical and dental degrees from Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Dental Medicine. Ever since, he has dedicated his life to community service and his surgical skills to improving community and global health.

An impassioned humanitarian, Afshar serves as one of the faculty members in the Program in Global Surgery and Social Change at Harvard Medical School. As an entrepreneur and innovator, he’s co-founded a health care software company that enables providers to engage and manage patients and their families around complex episodes of care.

“My whole orientation in life is around being of service — service to my patients, service to my community and service to my family,” Afshar says.

Hover over the icons in the photo above to learn more about Afshar and what keeps him going.

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Clinical drug trial seeks to avoid liver transplant for LAL deficiency

(Image courtesy Ed Neilan)

neilan_edward_dsc9139Second in a two-part series on metabolic liver disease. Read part 1.

According to the American Liver Foundation, about 1 in 10 Americans have some form of liver disease. One rare, under-recognized disorder, lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency, can fly under the radar until it becomes life-threatening, often requiring a liver transplant. LAL deficiency currently has no specific treatment, but that may change thanks to combined expertise in genetics, metabolism and hepatology.

In recent years, Boston Children’s Hospital’s Director of Hepatology, Maureen Jonas, MD, and the Metabolism Program’s Edward Neilan, MD, PhD, diagnosed three children with LAL deficiency. All three are now enrolled in the first international LAL deficiency clinical trial, with Neilan serving as Boston Children’s principal investigator.

“LAL deficiency is currently under-diagnosed,” Neilan says. “We think the disease is more common than doctors have thought and now, with a treatment in trial, it is of greater importance to identify those patients so they may have better outcomes.”

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My work, my life: Michael J. Docktor, MD

Michael J. Docktor, MD, Boston Children’s Hospital’s clinical director of Innovation and director of Clinical Mobile Solutions, is also a practicing gastroenterologist, a proud father of two and a passionate mobile-and-digital health trailblazer. An original co-founder of Hacking Pediatrics, Docktor’s goal is to bridge the gap between entrepreneurship, consumer technology, design and clinical pain points.

Hover over the images and icons in the photo below to learn more about Docktor’s professional and personal life, favorite gadgets and more.

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What we’ve been reading: Week of May 18, 2015

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From cancer to feet: the power of Twitter in healthcare (MedCity News)
Why does Twitter care about the healthcare industry? Craig Hashi, one of two Twitter engineers dedicated to healthcare, details the opportunities.

MIT’s implantable device could help docs determine best cancer medicine (Boston Business Journal)
Removing the trial and error associated with cancer drug treatments is high on oncologists’ wish lists. Heeding that call, MIT has developed an implantable device (about the size of a grain of rice) that can carry up to 30 different drug doses to a cancerous tumor, and then be removed to test responses.

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The silk scaffold: A promising road to hollow organ reconstruction

Silk photo_black backgroundSilk production and global interest in the lustrous fiber date back to prehistoric times. Today, the natural protein is solidifying itself as a biomaterials alternative in the world of regenerative medicine.

A recent study conducted by Boston Children’s Hospital urologist Carlos Estrada, MD and bioengineer Joshua Mauney, PhD, shows two-layer, biodegradable silk scaffolds to be a promising cell-free, “off-the-shelf” alternative to traditional implants for the reconstruction of hollow gastrointestinal structures such as the esophagus.

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What we’ve been reading: Week of March 30, 2015

shutterstock_175074977Bubble wrap used for cheap blood and bacteria tests (New Scientist)
Snap, crackle, pop are the familiar sounds of bubble wrap. According to George Whitesides at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, the cheap packing material may be popping up in the near future as a diagnostic tool, replacing costlier 96-well plates.

Nearly half of all pre-schoolers with ADHD are on medication (Washington Post)
The American Academy of Pediatrics calls for children under 6 with ADHD to engage in behavioral therapy before taking medication. Yet according to a national survey published in the Journal of Pediatrics, nearly half of preschool-aged children are on medication for the condition, and more than a fifth were receiving neither of the recommended therapies.

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What we’ve been reading

What we are reading 4Vector’s picks of recent pediatric healthcare, science and innovation news.

Trial of 2 Ebola Vaccines’ Effectiveness Is Announced (New York Times)
The first clinical trial of an Ebola vaccine is scheduled to begin in Liberia early February, testing candidate vaccines from Merck and Glaxo Smith Kline.

Guinea’s Health Minister Says Ebola Situation ‘Improving’ (NPR.org)
“We saw people shaking hands,” reports correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, speaking from Guinea’s capital. But is it a real turn-around?

Smart jewelry that camouflages tech reflects consumer wellness trend (MedCity News)
Fitness or fashion? New smart jewelry makes wearables more attractive for women.

Scientists Work to Contain Modified Organisms to Labs (New York Times)
George Church is at it again. Reporting in Nature, his team has developed a complex safety technique to contain genetically modified bacteria, engineering them to require an amino acid that can only be supplied artificially.

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Frozen poop pill offers a less invasive treatment option for emerging infectious disease

GI_6716_FecalTransplantGraphic_v3_ThumbnailThe fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) movement is catching the attention of scientists, researchers and the media nationwide. Currently, fecal transplantation delivers pre-screened, healthy human donor stool to a patient via colonoscopy or by nasogastric tube. It’s prescribed as an effective alternative to long-term antibiotic use in treating debilitating infectious diseases such as Clostridium difficile, also known as C-diff.

But new research published in Journal of the American Medical Association says there is a third, less invasive, less expensive option to treat C-diff: poop in a pill.

“This ground-breaking paper shows that with encapsulated, frozen donor stool, fecal transplantation can be used to successfully treat recurring C-diff infection in 90 percent of cases,” says George H. Russell, MD, MS, pediatric gastroenterologist in the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center at Boston Children’s Hospital and co-author of the Massachusetts General Hospital-sponsored study. “[The study] provides proof-of-concept that invasive means do not need to be used to deliver the fecal transplant.”

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