Author: Scott Pomeroy, MD, PhD

Beyond appearances: Molecular genetics revises brain tumor classification and care

What a brain tumor looks like isn’t the best predictor of prognosis. (Jensflorian/Wikimedia Commons)
What a brain tumor looks like isn’t the best predictor of prognosis. (Jensflorian/Wikimedia Commons)

Scott PomeroyScott Pomeroy, MD, PhD, is Neurologist-in-Chief at Boston Children’s Hospital. He practices in the Brain Tumor Center and is a member of the F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center.

For almost a century, brain tumors have been diagnosed based on their appearance under a microscope and classified by their resemblance to the brain cells from which they are derived. For example, astrocytoma ends with “-oma” to designate that it is a tumor derived from astrocytes. In some cases, especially in children, brain tumors resemble cells in the developing brain and are named for the cells from which they are presumed to arise, such as pineoblastoma for developing cells within the pineal gland or medulloblastoma for developing cells within the cerebellum or brainstem.

In June, the World Health Organization (WHO), which sets the worldwide standard, released an updated brain tumor classification scheme that, for the first time, includes molecular and genetic features.

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A match made in heaven: The Children’s/MIT Research Enterprise

Crossing the river has had benefits that go back decades (Roger Wollstadt/Flickr, 1975)

It’s inspiring to see what happens when a hospital dedicated to providing the best treatments for children partners with a world-class technology and engineering institution.  Children’s Hospital Boston and MIT have embarked upon an exciting program of collaboration and cross-fertilization in research, teaching and mentoring. The goal is to connect outstanding disease-oriented research with cutting-edge innovation and technologies, taking our ability to care for children to a new level while training the next generation of clinicians and scientists.

The historical ties between Children’s and MIT run deep. Individual scientists and clinicians have teamed up to design new medical devices; to identify gene mutations that underlie cancer and disorders of development; to create new approaches to drug delivery using slow-release polymers to extend medication efficacy;

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