Author: Sukanya Charuchandra

Galloway-Mowat mutations have dual target: kidney cells, neurons

Evidence of disease in GAMOS patients
Disease phenotype of GAMOS patients. Left: Kidney cells show signs of nephrotic syndrome. Right: Anomalies in brain development

With the help of more than 100 clinical collaborators around the world, Friedhelm Hildebrandt, MD has received thousands of blood samples from patients with nephrotic syndrome. They have helped Hildebrandt’s lab determine several underlying causes of this serious kidney disorder, in which high levels of protein are expelled in the urine.

“Nephrotic syndrome is not one disease; in fact, we already know that it is 55 different diseases,” says Hildebrandt, chief of the Division of Nephrology at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Over the course of time, Hildebrandt’s lab has discovered 35 of the more than 55 genes that can cause nephrotic syndrome. Identifying the different genetic pieces of the puzzle can help tailor a precision medicine approach to treating patients.

The latest piece, published earlier this month in Nature Genetics, is a set of four single-gene mutations that cause Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GAMOS) a rare disorder causing early-onset nephrotic syndrome and, often, microcephaly (abnormally small head size). Until now, the genetic changes underlying GAMOS and why they affect two disparate organs — the brain and kidney — have not been well understood. 

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“Omics” study takes a comprehensive look at premature birth

Seven layers of omics study
Seven layers of “omics” included in the PREM-MAP study

Every year, one in 10 new babies in the United States is born preterm, or before 37 weeks of gestation. With the last few weeks of pregnancy crucial to proper development of the lungs and brain, prematurely born infants can suffer lifelong problems.

Now scientists at Boston Children’s Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have launched a comprehensive study to understand the reasons and risk factors for premature births. Earlier this year, Olaf Bodamer, MD, PhD was awarded a grant for this work from uBiome, a microbial genomics company.

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Novel therapeutic cocktail could restore fine motor skills after spinal cord injury and stroke

CST axons sprout from intact to injured side
Therapeutic mixture induces sprouting of axons from healthy (L) into the injured (R) side of the spinal cord.

Neuron cells have long finger-like structures, called axons, that extend outward to conduct impulses and transmit information to other neurons and muscle fibers. After spinal cord injury or stroke, axons originating in the brain’s cortex and along the spinal cord become damaged, disrupting motor skills. Now, reported today in Neuron, a team of scientists at Boston Children’s Hospital has developed a method to promote axon regrowth after injury.

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When asymptomatic viral infections turn deadly: Lessons from flies

Fruit flies

When Dr. Jonathan Kagan’s student came to him complaining of dying fruit flies, the two were unaware that their research was about to take an unexpected turn. Their goal in establishing Drosophila lines had been to study virus-host interactions. It was quickly subverted when the flies died on exposure to carbon dioxide, used when transferring flies between vials.

This was surprising on two fronts. First, carbon dioxide is routinely used to anesthetize the flies, with no ill effects. Second, the uninfected flies did not die. The virus used to infect the flies, called vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), normally does not cause symptoms, even with the virus making several thousand copies of itself.

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From mice to humans: Genetic syndromes may be key to finding autism treatment

Boy and a mouse eye-to-eye
(Aliaksei Lasevich/stock.adobe.com)

A beautiful, happy little girl, Emma is the apple of her parents’ eyes and adored by her older sister. The only aspect of her day that is different from any other 6-month-old’s is the medicine she receives twice a day as part of a clinical trial for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC).

Emma’s mother was just 20 weeks pregnant when she first heard the words “tuberous sclerosis,” a rare genetic condition that causes tumors to grow in various organs of the body. Prenatal imaging showed multiple benign tumors in Emma’s heart.

Emma displays no symptoms of her disease, except for random “spikes” on her electroencephalogram (EEG) picked up by her doctors at Boston Children’s Hospital. The medication she is receiving is part of the Preventing Epilepsy Using Vigabatrin in Infants with TSC (PREVeNT) trial. Her mother desperately hopes it is the active antiepileptic drug, vigabatrin, rather than placebo.

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Building precision medicine: Power to the patients

Tools to build precision medicinePrecision medicine involves the development and application of targeted therapeutics based on patients’ genomes, lifestyles and environments. The recent conference on precision medicine at Harvard Medical School highlighted a few challenges in scaling up this process.

To help further precision medicine, the Obama administration and NIH launched the All of Us program, registrations for which are slated to start later this year. Its aim is to collect health data from one million Americans.

But the conference also highlighted several tools that patients can use proactively to collect, share and analyze their own data and use it to improve their own health — and contribute to precision medicine as citizen scientists.

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Three challenges precision medicine faces before it can scale up

Different aspects of precision medicine therapyDoctors, scientists, consumers, entrepreneurs and others came together recently for the Precision Medicine 2017 symposium at Harvard Medical School, now in its third year. This year’s theme was “breakaway business models.” What are challenges in developing targeted treatments based on clinical and genetic data, and how do we overcome them?

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Mutated botulinum neurotoxin B: A stronger player in the Botox world?

Clostridium botulinum

Famously associated with smoothing out wrinkles, botulinum toxin — better known as Botox — has been in use for 40 years now. Initially approved as a treatment for crossed eyes and then facial wrinkles, its on- and off-label uses today extend to urinary incontinence, migraines, perspiration, spasticity and even depression. But the diffusion of the toxin away from the injection site can also cause side effects like difficulty swallowing and drooping of the face.

Now, scientists have created an altered botulinum toxin, one that works much better than its natural version and with potentially fewer side effects. Their findings are written up in Nature Communications.

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A new, much needed target for treating Candida albicans

Candida albicans

Fungal diseases commonly bring to mind the words “dangerous” or “difficult to cure.” Now, scientists might just be a step closer to treating diseases caused by one common, problematic fungus, Candida albicans, by targeting a key player unique to fungi in an important growth pathway.

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