Author: Sukanya Charuchandra

Building precision medicine: Power to the patients

Tools to build precision medicinePrecision medicine involves the development and application of targeted therapeutics based on patients’ genomes, lifestyles and environments. The recent conference on precision medicine at Harvard Medical School highlighted a few challenges in scaling up this process.

To help further precision medicine, the Obama administration and NIH launched the All of Us program, registrations for which are slated to start later this year. Its aim is to collect health data from one million Americans.

But the conference also highlighted several tools that patients can use proactively to collect, share and analyze their own data and use it to improve their own health — and contribute to precision medicine as citizen scientists.

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Three challenges precision medicine faces before it can scale up

Different aspects of precision medicine therapyDoctors, scientists, consumers, entrepreneurs and others came together recently for the Precision Medicine 2017 symposium at Harvard Medical School, now in its third year. This year’s theme was “breakaway business models.” What are challenges in developing targeted treatments based on clinical and genetic data, and how do we overcome them?

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Mutated botulinum neurotoxin B: A stronger player in the Botox world?

Clostridium botulinum

Famously associated with smoothing out wrinkles, botulinum toxin — better known as Botox — has been in use for 40 years now. Initially approved as a treatment for crossed eyes and then facial wrinkles, its on- and off-label uses today extend to urinary incontinence, migraines, perspiration, spasticity and even depression. But the diffusion of the toxin away from the injection site can also cause side effects like difficulty swallowing and drooping of the face.

Now, scientists have created an altered botulinum toxin, one that works much better than its natural version and with potentially fewer side effects. Their findings are written up in Nature Communications.

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A new, much needed target for treating Candida albicans

Candida albicans

Fungal diseases commonly bring to mind the words “dangerous” or “difficult to cure.” Now, scientists might just be a step closer to treating diseases caused by one common, problematic fungus, Candida albicans, by targeting a key player unique to fungi in an important growth pathway.

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