Stories about: Diagnostics

EEG patterns diverge in babies of stressed mothers

Study of newborn EEG and maternal stress
A study in JAMA Pediatrics assessed new mothers’ stress levels and EEG patterns in their 2-month-old babies. Such patterns could help flag infants at risk.(PHOTO: EMILY REILLY / BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL)

Does exposure to stress early in life affect a baby’s brain development, and is there a way to single out babies who might benefit from early intervention? A two-center study led by Boston Children’s Hospital, published today in JAMA Pediatrics, used brain EEGs to begin to get at these questions in an objectively measurable way. It found that infants whose mothers reported high levels of stress have a distinct pattern of brain activity as measured by EEG — at only 2 months of age.

“The EEG has been found to be exquisitely sensitive to perturbations in the environment, and thus we are not entirely surprised to see an association between stress in a mother’s life and her infant’s brain activity,” says Charles Nelson, PhD, director of the Laboratories of Cognitive Neuroscience at Boston Children’s Hospital and the study’s senior investigator. “What we were surprised by, in part, was how early in life we see this association.”

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EEG data classify ‘autism’ into two distinct groups

[IMAGES FROM BMC NEUROLOGY (DOI 10.1186/s12883-019-1254-1)]

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th edition (DSM-5) established a single diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) that includes Asperger’s syndrome, formerly considered a separate condition. The change was meant to eliminate diagnostic ambiguities, but it has encouraged schools to take a “one size fits all” approach, putting all children with autistic features in the same classroom.

This concerns many parents and professionals. “Typically, such classrooms focus on the more severely impaired, often non-verbally communicative children without helping the higher functioning children, such as those with Asperger’s,” says Heidelise Als, PhD, a psychologist at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Als and her co-investigator Frank Duffy, MD, a neurologist at Boston Children’s, decided to take an unbiased look at children diagnosed with autism, using data from their EEGs. In a paper in BMC Neurology, they conclude that autism is not a single entity, but falls into two distinct clusters — ripe for additional investigation.

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Gene panel helps investigate sudden unexpected death in children

Thousands of cases of sudden unexplaied death (SUDP) occur each year.
(PHOTO: ADOBESTOCK)

Almost 10 percent of pediatric deaths occur suddenly and without explanation. In this terrible situation, the first question many parents have is “Why?” For most, answers never come.

Childhood deaths that cannot be explained by traditional autopsy and death-scene investigation are referred to as sudden unexplained deaths in pediatrics (SUDP). In children, these deaths are more common than those from either cardiac disease or cancer and typically occur in infancy or early childhood.

Robert’s Program at Boston Children’s Hospital, co-founded by Richard Goldstein, MD, and Hannah Kinney, MD, is adding a genetic approach to the search for answers.

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Newborn DNA sequencing finds actionable disease risks in nearly 10% of enrolled babies

BabySeq study sequenced the DNA of 159 newborns
(PHOTO: AdobeStock)

Current newborn screening tests a baby’s blood for several dozen known, treatable conditions. Can full-on DNA sequencing at birth add more benefit? Interpreting sequencing results is complex: having a genetic variant doesn’t always mean having the disease, and many of the conditions identified may not currently be treatable.

To explore what DNA sequencing might turn up, the BabySeq study, an NIH-funded project, was in launched in 2015. A team led by Ozge Ceyhan-Birsoy, PhD of Partners HealthCare and Alan H. Beggs, PhD, now reports the comprehensive results of whole-exome sequencing in 159 infants. Their analysis is published in the American Journal of Human Genetics.

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ctDNA: Bringing ‘liquid biopsies’ to pediatric solid tumors

Brian Crompton studies the use of ctDNA as an alternative way to biopsy pediatric solid tumors
Brian Crompton with Stephanie Meyer (left) and Kellsey Wuerthele (PHOTO: JOHN DEPUTY)

Our blood carries tiny amounts of DNA from broken-up cells. If we have cancer, some of that DNA comes from tumor cells. Studies performed with adult cancers have shown that this circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may offer crucial clues about tumor genetic mutations and how tumors respond to treatment.

Brian Crompton, MD, with colleagues at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and elsewhere, is now working to bring ctDNA “liquid biopsies” to pediatric solid tumors as well. The researchers hope that these blood tests will eventually improve early detection, choice of treatment and monitoring of young patients with these diseases without having to sample the tumor itself.

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Genomic sequencing for newborns: Are parents receptive?

BabySeqCasie Genetti, MS, CGC is a licensed genetic counselor with the Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research at Boston Children’s Hospital. She is first author of a recently published paper on the BabySeq Project.

The idea of genomic sequencing for every newborn has many in the scientific community buzzing with excitement, while leaving others wary of the ethical and social implications. But what do the parents think? The BabySeq Project has been exploring parental motivations and concerns while assessing their willingness to participate in a pilot newborn sequencing study.

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Tracking the elusive genes that cause strabismus

strabismus genes
(PHOTO: ADOBE STOCK)

Strabismus is a common condition in which the eyes do not align properly, turning inward, outward, upward or downward. Two to four percent of children have some form of it. Some cases can be treated with glasses or eye patching; other cases require eye muscle surgery. But the treatments don’t address the root causes of strabismus, which experts believe is neurologic.

For decades, Elizabeth Engle, MD, in Boston Children’s Hospital’s F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center, has been studying rare forms of strabismus, such as Duane syndrome, in which strabismus is caused by limited eye movements. Her lab has identified a variety of genes that, when mutated, disrupt the development of cranial nerves that innervate the eye muscles. These genetic findings have led to many insights about motor neurons and how they develop and grow.

More recently, with postdoctoral research fellow Sherin Shabaan, MD, PhD, Engle’s lab has been gathering families with common, non-paralytic strabismus, in which both eyes have a full, normal range of motion yet do not line up properly.

Such “garden variety” forms of strabismus have been much harder to pin down genetically.

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Patients with epilepsy and inflammatory bowel disease to get DNA sequenced in study

3000 exomes study to sequence patients with epilepsy, IBD
ILLUSTRATION: ADOBE STOCK

Boston Children’s Hospital has embarked on a strategic initiative to accelerate and expand its research genomics gateway, with plans to sequence the DNA of 3,000 patients with epilepsy or inflammatory bowel disease and their family members. Patients will have access to enroll in this pilot study if their condition is of likely genetic origin but lack a diagnosis after initial clinical genetic testing.

Sequencing will cover the entire exome, containing all of a person’s protein-coding genes. The Epilepsy and IBD were chosen for the pilot because Ann Poduri, MD, MPH and Scott Snapper, MD, PhD, have already made huge inroads into the genetics of these respective disorders. Both have built large, well characterized patient databases for research purposes, have disease-specific genetic expertise and have begun using their findings to inform their patients’ care.

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Precision medicine: Focus turns toward data sharing, costs, access

Precision Medicine 2018 at Harvard Medical School
(Paul Avillach via Twitter)

Precision medicine is often equated with high-tech, exquisitely targeted, million-dollar drug treatments. But at Precision Medicine 2018, hosted by Harvard Medical School’s Department of Biomedical Informatics (DBMI) this week, many of the speakers and panelists were more concerned about improving health for everyone and making better use of what we already have: data.

“We’re not going to make major changes in 21st century medicine without embracing data-driven approaches,” said HMS dean George Q. Daley in his opening remarks.

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Elusive epilepsy mutations begin to yield up their secrets

mosaic epilepsy mutations concept
Fawn Gracey illustration

Anti-seizure drugs don’t work in about a third of people with epilepsy. But for people with focal epilepsy, whose seizures originate in a discrete area of the brain, surgery is sometimes an option. The diseased brain tissue that’s removed also offers a rare opportunity to discover epilepsy-related genes.

Many mutations causing epilepsy have been discovered by testing DNA taken from the blood. But it’s becoming clear that not all epilepsy mutations show up on blood tests. So-called somatic mutations can arise directly in tissues like the brain during early prenatal development. Even within the brain, these mutations may affect only a fraction of the cells — those descended from the original mutated cell. This can create a “mosaic” pattern, with affected and unaffected cells sometimes intermingling.

One of the first such mutations to be described, by Ann Poduri, MD, MPH, and colleagues at Boston Children’s Hospital in 2012, was in Dante, a young boy who was having relentless daily seizures. The entire right side of Dante’s brain was malformed and enlarged, and he underwent a drastic operation, hemispherectomy, to remove it. Only later, studying brain samples from Dante and similar children, did Poduri find the genetic cause: a mutation in the gene AKT3. It affected only about a third of Dante’s brain cells. 

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