Stories about: Information technology

Building precision medicine: Power to the patients

Tools to build precision medicinePrecision medicine involves the development and application of targeted therapeutics based on patients’ genomes, lifestyles and environments. The recent conference on precision medicine at Harvard Medical School highlighted a few challenges in scaling up this process.

To help further precision medicine, the Obama administration and NIH launched the All of Us program, registrations for which are slated to start later this year. Its aim is to collect health data from one million Americans.

But the conference also highlighted several tools that patients can use proactively to collect, share and analyze their own data and use it to improve their own health — and contribute to precision medicine as citizen scientists.

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Caremap: Mobile app lets families track their children’s health, their way

Caremap
Carson Domey fires up Caremap

Family caregivers — as well as older children and adolescents — now have a powerful health data tracker. With a free iPhone app called Caremap, they can securely store and organize vital medical information, share it with health professionals, track health metrics important to them and gain insights to inform care.

For Michelle Domey, that means keeping close tabs on her son Carson’s Crohn’s disease. It means understanding early warning signs and what triggers a flare, like not getting enough sleep. “When he has a flare, the app is something we could take into an appointment,” she says. “We have historical data that can show us what may have triggered it.”

Available for free in the iTunes App Store, Caremap was developed by Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) in collaboration with Duke Health System. It was built using Apple’s open source CareKit framework.

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Under the hood of healthcare innovation: Jared Hawkins and the digital phenotype

Jared Hawkins Boston Children's Hospital

What does it take to change healthcare for the better? In the second of a two-part series on digital health innovators at Boston Children’s Hospital, we profile Jared Hawkins, MMSc, PhD. Like Gajen Sunthara, MSc, featured in part one, Hawkins was named among MedTech Boston’s 40 Under 40 Healthcare Innovators for 2017.

Jared Hawkins, director of informatics at Boston Children’s Innovation and Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA), brings a formidable skill set to his work. With a PhD in Immunology from Tufts University School of Medicine and an MMSc in Biomedical Informatics from Harvard Medical School, his background combines biomedical research (immunology, virology, oncology, genomics) with data science, visualization, computational modeling and software development.

His current work spans an equally diverse range of topics, touching on population and public health, patient experience, decision support and pharmacogenomics. A faculty member in the Computational Health Informatics Program, Hawkins is wired into the digital health ecosystem. He serves as a scientific advisor and co-founder of Raiing Medical (home temperature and fertility tracking) and is the head of engineering and co-founder of Circulation (non-emergency medical transportation via Uber).

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Under the hood of healthcare innovation: Gajen Sunthara and leveraging EHRs

Gajen Sunthara
(Photo: Greg Weintraub)

What does it take to be an innovator changing our healthcare system for the better? This two-part series profiles two digital health innovators at Boston Children’s Hospital who were named among MedTech Boston’s 40 Under 40 Healthcare Innovators for 2017.

Gajen Sunthara, MSc, has two innovation passions: healthcare policy and electronic health records (EHRs). With professional experiences spanning technology, business and government, he finds himself in a position to effect change in a way that few others can.

“Gajen’s passion for healthcare is evident from the moment that you meet him,” says Farhanah Sheets, a software engineer at Boston Children’s Innovation and Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) who reports to Sunthara. “No matter how big or small the idea, he brings a level of excitement to each project that is contagious.”

As director of Innovation R&D for IDHA, Sunthara is leading significant efforts around EHR interoperability — the ability of healthcare information systems to exchange and use each other’s data. He’s also focused on creating applications that can easily be integrated into any EHR system.

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Looking between seizures to map seizures’ origins

seizure mapping

When epilepsy can’t be controlled with drugs, neurosurgery is sometimes curative, if the seizures are coming from discrete brain tissue that can be safely removed.

Finding these diseased areas, however, can require invasive surgery to place grids of electrodes on the brain’s surface. That’s followed by long-term, 24-hour EEG monitoring — typically for a week — until a seizure happens. Neurosurgeons then use this data to map a surgical path. But to actually remove the diseased tissue, a second operation is needed.

That’s enough to deter many families from epilepsy surgery. But what if seizure origins could be mapped without having to actually observe a seizure?

Joseph Madsen, MD, director of Epilepsy Surgery at Boston Children’s Hospital, and Eun-Hyoung Park, PhD, a computational biophysicist in the Department of Neurosurgery, think they have a way to do that — with an algorithm originally used for economic forecasting. 

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Lessons from the data: Applying machine learning for clinical decision support

machine learning clinical decision support

Mauricio Santillana, PhD, faculty member in the Computational Health Informatics Program at Boston Children’s Hospital, had an idea as he witnessed the volume of continuous real-time data generated in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). He realized that tapping the data on patients’ ever-changing vital signs, with the help of machine-learning algorithms, could support clinical decision-making and predict (and help head off) up-coming health issues.

He started a dialogue with the hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator, and now collaborates closely with clinicians in the PICU to create machine-learning algorithms that can help them provide the highest level of care.

“It’s fairly recent that clinicians realized people with backgrounds in math and statistics can be very helpful in a clinical context,” says Santillana

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2017 Innovators’ Showcase spotlights healthcare decision support

2017 Innovator's Showcase Boston Children's Hospital

Healthcare innovations will be on display next week — April 12 — at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator’s annual showcase. The event, from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., will be kicked off by a discussion on clinical decision support with Doug Perrin, a bioengineer/computer scientist in Cardiac Surgery at Boston Children’s and Garry Steil, who is developing a glucose control technology for diabetes patients at the hospital.

Exhibits, demos and mingling will take place in the Patient Entertainment Center off the main hospital lobby (300 Longwood Avenue, Boston).

Among the roughly 20 apps, ventures and technologies on display:

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Developing a startup: bringing your healthcare innovation to market

a digital health startup

Sixth and last in an on-going series of Innovator’s Roadmap posts from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA). Matt Murphy is Innovation Lead at IDHA.

We recently provided guidelines for selecting a platform and developing a Minimal Viable Product to take your digital health innovation beyond the prototype stage and create meaningful iterations. Once a Minimum Viable Product has been developed, numerous commercialization pathways are available, such as licensing an innovation to an existing company. But for many innovators, the best path may involve forming a startup company.

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7 digital health tips: Selecting a platform and developing a minimal viable product

digital health

Fifth in an ongoing series of Innovator’s Roadmap posts from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA). Matt Murphy is Innovation Lead at IDHA.

We recently provided guidelines for developing prototypes of digital health products incorporating user-centered design and feedback from multiple sources. Let’s assume you’ve gone through multiple cycles of design updates, informed by your project goals and requirements, regulatory considerations and your long-term business or clinical strategy. Now, it’s time to select a technology platform and begin developing a fully functioning prototype of your innovation — your minimum viable product (MVP).

Below are some technical and tactical considerations to ensure your innovation’s long-term success and sustainability.

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4 tactical steps to designing for digital health

design digital health

Third in an ongoing series of Innovator’s Roadmap posts from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA). Matt Murphy is Innovation Lead at IDHA.

We recently provided market sizing guidelines for healthcare innovators — strategies to help you determine your innovation’s total number of potential users and your sales opportunities. Next, we’ll take you through our approach to designing digital health products.

The research and design phase is a critical step in the development and commercialization of digital health innovations. This phase is often referred to as user-centered design or human factors design. It requires a significant investment in understanding your users (including clinicians, clinical teams, patients and/or caregivers) and their pain points (problems they repeatedly experience) before developing a technology-based solution.

In our initial consultations with innovators at Boston Children’s Hospital, we spend only a small amount of time discussing end technology solutions. Instead, we seek to understand the intended users, their pain points and how they will interact with the innovation, including clinical, workflow and business considerations.

It’s market research taken a step further. We recommend you follow a specific four-step procedure to optimize the research and design phase.

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