Stories about: Information technology

Health care wants YOU: 9 opportunities, 4 pearls for digital health startups

digital health startups - reverse pitches
A visual summary of reverse digital health pitches (illustration: CollectiveNext).

Boston’s digital health world is humming with tech talent, idealistic health care professionals and business-savvy accelerator organizations. The passion was palpable last week as 300-plus people gathered at MassChallenge’s latest Pulse@Check digital health meetup, hoping to turn their health care ideas into reality.

The event, hosted by Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation and Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) and Cerner, a lead developer of health care IT systems, presented numerous opportunities and tips for digital health startups.

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Startup uses Uber to get patients to their medical appointments

Uber medical transportation Circulation

Getting to the doctor will soon get easier for some struggling patients. Boston Children’s Hospital has joined forces with the ride-hailing service Uber to pilot a non-emergency medical transportation platform.

The online, HIPAA-compliant tool, called Circulation, connects with health care information systems, enabling hospitals to schedule Uber rides for patients. The pilot will serve Boston Children’s, Mercy Health System in Pennsylvania and Nemours Children’s Health System in Wilmington, Delaware.

A 2005 study estimated that 3.6 million people miss medical appointments because they don’t have access to transportation. While Medicare and Medicaid and other payers provide non-emergency transportation benefits, such as taxi vouchers, patients may be unaware of the programs or have trouble navigating reimbursement rules for the rides. Frequently, the taxi or car service arrives late or doesn’t show up at all.

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I feel good! How mood influences time management

time management and mood

Most theorists boil human behavior down to a pursuit of pleasure. Yet all of us engage in mundane, even unpleasant activities. It’s called being an adult, right? Happy Monday!

But Maxime Taquet, PhD at the Computational Radiology Laboratory at Boston Children’s Hospital (who by day helps conduct advanced brain imaging in children with neurologic conditions) wondered why. If we’re such pleasure-seekers, how do we muster the will to do our taxes or vacuum the house?

Taquet, with Jordi Quoidbach, PhD, of the Department of Economics and Business at the University Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, and other colleagues developed a smartphone app to track the activities and moods of more than 28,000 French-speaking people for an average of 27 days. At random times during the day, the app asked users to rate their current mood on a scale of 0 to 100 and indicate what they were doing at that moment from a list of options.

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Tracking the public health effects of the Rio Olympics: HealthMap

Olympics Brazil Zika Health Map
Athletes around the world are converging on Brazil. What effects will this have on Zika and public health generally? (Nuno Lopes/Pixabay)

This past week, the 2016 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games began in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with more than 11,000 athletes and 500,000 international fans expected to arrive. As a major mass gathering, the Olympic Games are always vulnerable to disease outbreaks. This summer, all eyes in public health are on the concurrently occurring Zika virus and the under-reported H1N1 influenza outbreak in Brazil.

According to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), visitors to the 2016 Games are most at risk for gastrointestinal illness from waterborne pathogens and mosquito-borne infections, including dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus. So far in 2016, we have seen an estimated 165,000 cases of Zika virus, 1,345,286 cases of dengue, 137,808 cases of chikungunya and more than 6,500 cases of H1N1 influenza, with an additional 1,233 deaths from H1N1 — all in Brazil alone.

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Moving one step closer to smartphone-like, interoperable EHR apps

Medical app buttons croppedToday, most people’s clinical records remain siloed at a single hospital or health network. For the most part, health apps can’t tap into these data, nor can medicine learn from them. Also, most electronic health records (EHRs) are unable to import the biometric data people are collecting from their own devices, much less interpret them.

In 2009, Kenneth Mandl, MD, MPH, and Isaac Kohane, MD, PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital published a manifesto in The New England Journal of Medicine calling for health care information systems to have iPhone functionality. This would entail several key attributes: liquidity of data, modularity of applications, accommodation of both open-source and closed-source software through open standards, and the ability to support diverse applications.

In short, they envisioned a “plug and play” health IT platform.

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Real-time influenza tracking with electronic health records

influenza tracking
Data captured from healthcare visits could be a tool for medical surveillance.

Early influenza detection and the ability to predict outbreaks are critical to public health. Reliable estimates of when influenza will peak can help drive proper timing of flu shots and prevent health systems from being blindsided by unexpected surges, as happened in the 2012-2013 flu season.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention collects accurate data, but with a time lag of one to two weeks. Google Flu Trends began offering real-time data in 2008, based on people’s Internet searches for flu-related terms. But it ultimately failed, at least in part because not everyone who searches “flu” is actually sick. As of last year, Google instead now sends its search data to scientists at the CDC, Columbia University and Boston Children’s Hospital.

Now, a Boston Children’s-led team demonstrates a more accurate way to pick up flu trends in near-real-time — at least a week ahead of the CDC — by harnessing data from electronic health records (EHRs).

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Reimagining connected health through home hubs

home health hubs

Through smart home hubs and the growing Internet of Things, people can now control lights, thermostats and other appliances and get information and entertainment with their always-connected digital devices. Consumers have widely adopted home automation products like Nest from Google and ecosystems like Apple’s HomeKit and Amazon’s Alexa.

But home hubs also have the potential to achieve the promise of connected health — access to health care services anywhere and anytime.

Home hubs can deliver enormous value as a means of health care delivery — not just helping casual consumers become familiar with their health and take preventive measures, but also helping manage complex care for patients with chronic illness and supporting timely decision making by clinical teams. Everybody involved with a person’s care can be plugged in, enabling coordination across providers and caregivers in a way that’s increasingly intuitive and meaningful.

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Fever, revisited: ResearchKit app will tap crowd-sourced temperature data

Feverprints temperature

What, exactly, is a fever?

It’s a surprisingly simple but important question in medicine. While a body temperature of 98.6°F (37°C) is generally considered “normal,” this number doesn’t account for temperature differences between individuals — and even within individuals at various times of the day. While a common sign of infection, fever can also occur with other medical conditions, including autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases.

“Many factors come together to set an individual’s ‘normal’ temperature, such as age, size, time of day and maybe even ancestry,” says Jared Hawkins, MMSc, PhD, the director of informatics for Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) and a member of the hospital’s Computational Health Informatics Program. “We want to help create a better understanding of the normal temperature variations throughout the day, to learn to use fever as a tool to improve medical diagnosis, and to evaluate the effect of fever medications on symptoms and disease course.”

That’s where Feverprints comes in

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Creating a blueprint for rare disease medicine

blueprint for rare disease medicinePresident Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative, first laid out in his 2015 State of Union Address, aims to develop individualized care that empowers patients and takes into account genetic, environmental and lifestyle differences. Obama is asking Congress for $309 million for the initiative next year.

One big component is the Department of Veteran Affairs’ Million Veteran Program, which has signed up more than 450,000 veterans to date and is now open to active-duty military personnel. Another is NIH support for cancer trials that match treatments with patients’ genomic profiles.

Parent/citizen scientist Matt Might has in mind another group: patients with undiagnosed genetic disorders. In searching for a diagnosis for his son Bertrand, Might came up with a precision medicine algorithm that outlines step by step what a patient and family can do — from genomic sequencing to finding similar patients to working with biomedical researchers to find therapeutic strategies. It’s an impressively comprehensive blueprint for citizen science.

As Might detailed today at a White House summit on the Precision Medicine Initiative, he now has worms at the University of Utah modeling his son’s disease, whose symptoms include seizures, extreme developmental delay and an inability to make tears. He also has a molecular target and a list of 70 compounds that hit it, including 14 that are already approved by the FDA.

Can Might’s vision be scaled and made part of routine medical care, keeping the patient front and center?

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Tracking Zika? Use HealthMap

Like a virus, the story of Zika virus in the Americas is evolving very, very rapidly. Just in the last week we’ve seen:

To help public health investigators, policy makers, epidemiologists and others keep up with the virus, the team at HealthMap has released a dedicated Zika virus tracking resource at The new map brings in Zika-related information and news from a variety of sources in near real-time, and includes a constantly updated interactive timeline of the virus’s explosive spread across South and Central America.

The HealthMap team is also providing regularly updated coverage of the Zika virus outbreak on their Disease Daily blog.

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