Stories about: Innovation

4 tactical steps to designing for digital health

design digital health

Third in an ongoing series of Innovator’s Roadmap posts from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA). Matt Murphy is Innovation Lead at IDHA.

We recently provided market sizing guidelines for healthcare innovators — strategies to help you determine your innovation’s total number of potential users and your sales opportunities. Next, we’ll take you through our approach to designing digital health products.

The research and design phase is a critical step in the development and commercialization of digital health innovations. This phase is often referred to as user-centered design or human factors design. It requires a significant investment in understanding your users (including clinicians, clinical teams, patients and/or caregivers) and their pain points (problems they repeatedly experience) before developing a technology-based solution.

In our initial consultations with innovators at Boston Children’s Hospital, we spend only a small amount of time discussing end technology solutions. Instead, we seek to understand the intended users, their pain points and how they will interact with the innovation, including clinical, workflow and business considerations.

It’s market research taken a step further. We recommend you follow a specific four-step procedure to optimize the research and design phase.

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A guide to market sizing for healthcare innovators

market sizing healthcare innovation

Second in a series of Innovator’s Roadmap posts from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA). Matt Murphy is Innovation Lead at IDHA.

We recently published some helpful tips on how to create a business model that accelerates and operationalizes a healthcare innovation. But a business model — and the unique value proposition you’ll offer to your users or customers — cannot exist on its own. It must serve a specific market or population.

Who are your users? And how many potential users would your product serve? Market sizing will enable you to answer these questions and others as you determine the financial opportunity and economic sustainability of your innovation.

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A healthcare Innovator’s Roadmap: 4 steps for developing a business model

healthcare innovation business plan

First in an on-going series of Innovator’s Roadmap posts from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA). Matt Murphy is Innovation Lead at IDHA.

Seeing an idea go from the lab or clinic to the wider world is exciting. However, clinicians, researchers and administrators don’t always have the time or resources to take their innovations to the next step — that is, build them to scale. At Boston Children’s Hospital, the Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA), comprised of 50+ researchers, business strategists and technologists, is dedicated to just that: We identify and vet high-priority health technology innovations at the hospital and provide the resources, funding and momentum to accelerate their development and commercialization.

To date, Boston Children’s has spun off more than 25 startup companies developed directly from clinical and research pain points. Some startups, like Neuromotion and Circulation, stand on their own. Others, including Epidemico, have been acquired by industry leaders. Through this experience, IDHA created the Innovator’s Roadmap – a comprehensive resource for taking ideas from concept to commercially available, impactful, economically sustainable products.

In this first installment, we look at the critical first step: understanding and justifying the business value of a technology or service by developing a business model.

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Soft robot could aid failing hearts by mimicking healthy cardiac muscle

heart-failure

Every year, about 2,100 people receive heart transplants in the U.S., while 5.7 million suffer from heart failure. Given the scarcity of available donor hearts, clinicians and biomedical engineers from Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard University have spent several years developing a mechanical alternative.

Their proof of concept is reported today in Science Translational Medicine: a soft robotic sleeve that is fitted around the heart, where it twists and compresses the heart’s chambers just like healthy cardiac muscle would do.

Heart failure occurs when one or both of the heart’s ventricles can no longer collect or pump blood effectively. Ventricular assist devices (VADs) are already used to sustain end-stage heart failure patients awaiting transplant, replacing the work of the ventricles through tubes that take blood out of the heart, send it through pumps or rotors and power it back into a patient’s bloodstream. But while VADs extend lives, they can cause complications.

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Clinical simulation training goes to the dogs

clinical simulation

Boston Children’s Hospital’s fast-growing Simulator Program, SIMPeds, creates medical scenarios for clinical teams to practice challenging procedures and situations in a risk-free environment. Now serving 27 departments and divisions at the hospital, SIMPeds’ customized simulations prepare clinicians for everything from a Code Blue to complex surgery to breaking difficult news to parents.

At the Simulation Center this week, there was one special team member being trained: Rafa, a Miniature Australian Shepherd auditioning to be part of Pawprints, Boston Children’s dog visitation program. Not all dogs are behaviorally up to the job when confronted with a hospital environment. So the SIM team created a mock intensive-care-unit patient room, fully equipped and complete with an overly enthusiastic child (overwhelming for some dogs), played by SIM engineer Katie Fitzpatrick. As Rafa interacted with the “patient,” the SIM staff set off alarms, had “doctors” and “nurses” come in and out and staged other hospital things that might distract or make a dog skittish.

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7 digital health predictions for 2017

digital health predictions

What does 2017 have in store for digital healthcare innovations? Vector connected with clinical, digital health and business experts from the Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) at Boston Children’s Hospital and asked for their predictions.

Overall? “Expect to see a reshaping of the patient journey, more patient-centric care and more clinically impactful technology in 2017,” says John Brownstein, PhD, Chief Innovation Officer at the hospital. “We’re also looking forward to digital health offerings being met by industry-wide adoption as patient-centric care is provided and reimbursed.”

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The future of cardiac MRI: 3-D cine

A 3-D motion-capture MRI of the heart

The heart is a dynamic, beating organ, and until now it has been challenging to fully capture its complexity by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In an ideal world, doctors could create a 3-D visual representation of each patient’s unique heart and watch as it pumps, moving through each phase of the cardiac cycle. Andrew Powell, MD, Chief of the Division of Cardiac Imaging at Boston Children’s Hospital, and his physicist colleague Mehdi Hedjazi Moghari, PhD, have taken steps toward realizing this vision.

The standard cardiac MRI includes multiple 2-D image slices stacked next to each other that must be carefully positioned  by the MRI technologist based on a patient’s anatomy. Planning the location and angle for the slices requires a highly-knowledgeable operator and takes time.

Powell and Moghari are working on a new MRI-based technology that can produce moving 3-D images of the heart. It allows cardiologists and cardiac surgeons to see a patient’s heart from any angle and observe its movement throughout the entire cardiac cycle.

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Real-time contextual information could help doctors interpret children’s brain scans

Radiologists who can tune in to the nuances of brain scans in children are a pretty rarified group. Only about 3 percent of U.S. radiologists, some 800 to 900 physicians, practice in pediatrics. Those specifically trained in pediatric neuroradiology are even scarcer.

To a less trained eye, normal developmental changes in a child’s brain may be misinterpreted as abnormal on MRI. Conversely, a complex brain disorder can sometimes appear normal. That’s especially true when the abnormality affects both sides of the brain equally (see sidebar).

It can be hard to find the cause of a child’s developmental delay without a proper read. “Pediatric brain scans of children under age 4 can be particularly tricky to read because the brain is rapidly developing during this period,” says Sanjay Prabhu, MBBS, a pediatric neuroradiologist at Boston Children’s Hospital. “If you’re looking at adult scans all the time, it’s incredibly difficult to transition to pediatric scans and understand what is considered ‘normal’ and ‘abnormal.’ Clinicians often wonder, ‘Should I repeat the scan? Should I send the patient to a specialist?’”

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Rainbow-hued blood stem cells shed new light on cancer, blood disorders

color-coded blood stem cells
These red blood cells bear color tags made from random combinations of red, green and blue fluorescent proteins. Same-color cells originate from the same blood stem cell (Nature Cell Biology 2016, Henninger et al).

A new color-coding tool is enabling scientists to better track live blood stem cells over time, a key part of understanding how blood disorders and cancers like leukemia arise, report researchers in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Stem Cell Research Program.

In Nature Cell Biology today, they describe the use of their tool in zebrafish to track blood stem cells the fish are born with, the clones (copies) these cells make of themselves and the types of specialized blood cells they give rise to (red cells, white cells and platelets). Leonard Zon, MD, director of the Stem Cell Research Program and a senior author on the paper, believes the tool has many implications for hematology and cancer medicine since zebrafish are surprisingly similar to humans genetically.

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Intravenous oxygen delivery edges toward the clinic

intravenous-oxygen-delivery
Engineered microparticles that deliver oxygen straight to the bloodstream in emergency situations

Sudden oxygen deprivation can happen for many reasons, from choking to aspiration to cardiac arrest. In these emergency situations, rapid oxygen delivery can mean the difference between life and death. But what if the person cannot breathe?

In the summer of 2012, John Kheir, MD, of the Heart Center at Boston Children’s Hospital, published a study in Science Translational Medicine describing an alternative oxygen delivery system. Kheir used tiny, gas-filled microparticles with a thin outer layer of lipids (fatty molecules) that combined to form a liquid foam-like substance. Injected into the bloodstream, the particles rapidly dissolved and delivered oxygen gas directly to the red blood cells in animal models. But the bubbles were very unstable and not suitable for clinical use.

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