Stories about: Innovation

Designing from the bottom up: Guiding healthcare stakeholders through ideation

healthcare co-design

At a recent event, Michelle Domey, mother of a child with special health care needs, found herself sharing her experience with a design expert, describing recent telehealth appointments at Boston Children’s Hospital. “My son feels like he’s having a private appointment, even though I’m sitting next to him, and his doctor is miles away,” she reflected. “Who thought that was possible through a tablet or a computer?”

As adult patients nodded in agreement, the group began to think about how to leverage Michelle’s experience to design support systems for kids with special health care needs. A software engineer expanded Michelle’s comment into a vision of the classroom of the future — a learning environment fully equipped with remote learning solutions for children with special health care needs, and environmental sensors for children with severe food allergies and health risks. The Olin College Co-Design for Better Health Innovation Lab was well underway.

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Developing a startup: bringing your healthcare innovation to market

a digital health startup

Sixth and last in an on-going series of Innovator’s Roadmap posts from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA). Matt Murphy is Innovation Lead at IDHA.

We recently provided guidelines for selecting a platform and developing a Minimal Viable Product to take your digital health innovation beyond the prototype stage and create meaningful iterations. Once a Minimum Viable Product has been developed, numerous commercialization pathways are available, such as licensing an innovation to an existing company. But for many innovators, the best path may involve forming a startup company.

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7 digital health tips: Selecting a platform and developing a minimal viable product

digital health

Fifth in an ongoing series of Innovator’s Roadmap posts from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA). Matt Murphy is Innovation Lead at IDHA.

We recently provided guidelines for developing prototypes of digital health products incorporating user-centered design and feedback from multiple sources. Let’s assume you’ve gone through multiple cycles of design updates, informed by your project goals and requirements, regulatory considerations and your long-term business or clinical strategy. Now, it’s time to select a technology platform and begin developing a fully functioning prototype of your innovation — your minimum viable product (MVP).

Below are some technical and tactical considerations to ensure your innovation’s long-term success and sustainability.

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Four prototyping strategies to test your healthcare innovation

digital health prototyping - paper sketch

Fourth in an ongoing series of Innovator’s Roadmap posts from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA). Matt Murphy is Innovation Lead at IDHA.

We recently provided guidelines for designing for digital health, a process that requires a complete understanding of the pain point a technology aims to solve. So let’s assume you’ve defined your project goals, brainstormed solutions with critical stakeholders and written up the project requirements. What happens after this design process is complete?

Your next step is developing a prototype, a critical output of user-centered design.

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4 tactical steps to designing for digital health

design digital health

Third in an ongoing series of Innovator’s Roadmap posts from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA). Matt Murphy is Innovation Lead at IDHA.

We recently provided market sizing guidelines for healthcare innovators — strategies to help you determine your innovation’s total number of potential users and your sales opportunities. Next, we’ll take you through our approach to designing digital health products.

The research and design phase is a critical step in the development and commercialization of digital health innovations. This phase is often referred to as user-centered design or human factors design. It requires a significant investment in understanding your users (including clinicians, clinical teams, patients and/or caregivers) and their pain points (problems they repeatedly experience) before developing a technology-based solution.

In our initial consultations with innovators at Boston Children’s Hospital, we spend only a small amount of time discussing end technology solutions. Instead, we seek to understand the intended users, their pain points and how they will interact with the innovation, including clinical, workflow and business considerations.

It’s market research taken a step further. We recommend you follow a specific four-step procedure to optimize the research and design phase.

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A guide to market sizing for healthcare innovators

market sizing healthcare innovation

Second in a series of Innovator’s Roadmap posts from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA). Matt Murphy is Innovation Lead at IDHA.

We recently published some helpful tips on how to create a business model that accelerates and operationalizes a healthcare innovation. But a business model — and the unique value proposition you’ll offer to your users or customers — cannot exist on its own. It must serve a specific market or population.

Who are your users? And how many potential users would your product serve? Market sizing will enable you to answer these questions and others as you determine the financial opportunity and economic sustainability of your innovation.

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A healthcare Innovator’s Roadmap: 4 steps for developing a business model

healthcare innovation business plan

First in an on-going series of Innovator’s Roadmap posts from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA). Matt Murphy is Innovation Lead at IDHA.

Seeing an idea go from the lab or clinic to the wider world is exciting. However, clinicians, researchers and administrators don’t always have the time or resources to take their innovations to the next step — that is, build them to scale. At Boston Children’s Hospital, the Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA), comprised of 50+ researchers, business strategists and technologists, is dedicated to just that: We identify and vet high-priority health technology innovations at the hospital and provide the resources, funding and momentum to accelerate their development and commercialization.

To date, Boston Children’s has spun off more than 25 startup companies developed directly from clinical and research pain points. Some startups, like Neuromotion and Circulation, stand on their own. Others, including Epidemico, have been acquired by industry leaders. Through this experience, IDHA created the Innovator’s Roadmap – a comprehensive resource for taking ideas from concept to commercially available, impactful, economically sustainable products.

In this first installment, we look at the critical first step: understanding and justifying the business value of a technology or service by developing a business model.

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Soft robot could aid failing hearts by mimicking healthy cardiac muscle

heart-failure

Every year, about 2,100 people receive heart transplants in the U.S., while 5.7 million suffer from heart failure. Given the scarcity of available donor hearts, clinicians and biomedical engineers from Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard University have spent several years developing a mechanical alternative.

Their proof of concept is reported today in Science Translational Medicine: a soft robotic sleeve that is fitted around the heart, where it twists and compresses the heart’s chambers just like healthy cardiac muscle would do.

Heart failure occurs when one or both of the heart’s ventricles can no longer collect or pump blood effectively. Ventricular assist devices (VADs) are already used to sustain end-stage heart failure patients awaiting transplant, replacing the work of the ventricles through tubes that take blood out of the heart, send it through pumps or rotors and power it back into a patient’s bloodstream. But while VADs extend lives, they can cause complications.

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Clinical simulation training goes to the dogs

clinical simulation

Boston Children’s Hospital’s fast-growing Simulator Program, SIMPeds, creates medical scenarios for clinical teams to practice challenging procedures and situations in a risk-free environment. Now serving 27 departments and divisions at the hospital, SIMPeds’ customized simulations prepare clinicians for everything from a Code Blue to complex surgery to breaking difficult news to parents.

At the Simulation Center this week, there was one special team member being trained: Rafa, a Miniature Australian Shepherd auditioning to be part of Pawprints, Boston Children’s dog visitation program. Not all dogs are behaviorally up to the job when confronted with a hospital environment. So the SIM team created a mock intensive-care-unit patient room, fully equipped and complete with an overly enthusiastic child (overwhelming for some dogs), played by SIM engineer Katie Fitzpatrick. As Rafa interacted with the “patient,” the SIM staff set off alarms, had “doctors” and “nurses” come in and out and staged other hospital things that might distract or make a dog skittish.

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7 digital health predictions for 2017

digital health predictions

What does 2017 have in store for digital healthcare innovations? Vector connected with clinical, digital health and business experts from the Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) at Boston Children’s Hospital and asked for their predictions.

Overall? “Expect to see a reshaping of the patient journey, more patient-centric care and more clinically impactful technology in 2017,” says John Brownstein, PhD, Chief Innovation Officer at the hospital. “We’re also looking forward to digital health offerings being met by industry-wide adoption as patient-centric care is provided and reimbursed.”

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