Stories about: Innovation

Forecasting the convergence of artificial intelligence and precision medicine

Image of artificial DNA, which in combination with other artificial intelligence could contribute to an artificial model of the immune system
Will an artificial model of the immune system be the key to discovering new, precision vaccines?

This is part I of a two-part blog series recapping the 2018 BIO International Convention.

At the 2018 BIO International Convention last week, it was clear what’s provoking scientific minds in industry and academia — or at least those of the Guinness-world-record-making 16,000 people in attendance. Artificial intelligence, machine learning and their implications for tailor-made medicine bubbled up across all BIO’s educational tracks and a majority of discussions about the future state of biotechnology. Panelists from Boston Children’s Hospital also contributed their insights to what’s brewing at the intersection of these burgeoning fields.

Isaac Kohane, MD, PhD, former chair of Boston Children’s Computational Health and Informatics Program, spoke on a panel about how large-scale patient data — if properly harnessed and analyzed for health and disease trends — is a virtual goldmine for precision medicine insights. Patterns gleaned from population health data or electronic health records, for example, could help identify which subgroups of patients who might respond better to specific therapies.

According to Kohane, who is currently the Marion J. Nelson Professor of Biomedical Informatics and Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School (HMS), we will soon be leveraging artificial intelligence to go through patient records and determine exactly what doctors were thinking when they saw patients.

“We’ve seen again and again that data abstraction by artificial intelligence is better than abstraction by human analysts when performed at the scale of millions of clinical notes across thousands of patients,” said Kohane.

And based on what we heard at BIO, artificial intelligence will revolutionize more than patient data mining. It will also transform the way we design precision therapeutics — and even vaccines — from the ground up.

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Viral discussion: Epidemics experts sound off on the future of infection control

Image of flu virus, which experts think will eventually lead to future epidemics
Is the next flu pandemic around the corner?

During the 1918 influenza pandemic, the average life expectancy in the U.S. dropped below 40 years old. Today, public health and medical professionals need to be actively preparing for the next great pandemic, according to leaders of the Massachusetts Medical Society, The New England Journal of Medicine and Microsoft founder Bill Gates, who delivered the keynote address at a Boston-based meeting on April 27 called Epidemics Going Viral: Innovation vs. Nature. Here’s recap of what we heard from various panelists.

The five key drivers of epidemics are population growth/urbanization, travel, animals, environmental/climate changes and conflicts/natural disasters, according to Harvey Fineberg, MD, PhD, President of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and former president of the Institute of Medicine. When it comes to predicting and preventing the next epidemic, Fineberg believes that data from a social media platform like Twitter isn’t going to help identify the next big outbreak.

But John Brownstein, PhD, an epidemiologist and Chief Innovation Officer at Boston Children’s Hospital, disagreed with that idea.

“I believe it’s possible for Twitter to find the next microbe,” Brownstein said. “This information comes in real time and at global scale.” Attendees who were live tweeting with the hashtag #epidemicsgoviral were quick to highlight this difference of opinion.

Uber flu shot, “a cool millennial thing to do”

Anne Schuchat, MD, deputy director of the Centers of Disease Control, busted the myth that non-vaccination rates are rising. She explained that media stories about anti-vaccination supporters can make it seem as though vaccination rates are falling when they actually aren’t.

“Less than one percent of kids aren’t vaccinated in the U.S.,” Schuchat said.

But some vaccinations, like the annual flu shot, still have big gaps to close. Brownstein described how a partnership with Uber — dispatching flu vaccines and nurses to people’s homes — was able to influence people to get their first-ever flu shot.

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Families and data scientists build insights on Phelan-McDermid syndrome

querying stacks of data

This is the third year that Jacob Works has made the trip down to Boston Children’s Hospital from Maine. With research assistant Haley Medeiros, he looks at pictures, answers questions, manipulates blocks and mimes actions like knocking on a door. His father, Travis, and another research assistant look on through a window.

“At first, we had to practically bribe him with an iPad with every task,” Travis says. “This year he’s more excited, because he understands more and is more confident and able to share more.”

Jacob, 11, was diagnosed in 2011 with Phelan-McDermid Syndrome, a rare genetic condition that typically causes children to be born “floppy,” with low muscle tone, and to have little or no speech, developmental delay and, often, autism-like behaviors. At the time, Jacob was one of about 800 known cases. But through chromosomal microarray testing, introduced in just the past decade for children with autism symptoms, more cases are being picked up.

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For biomedicine startups, the road to commercialization is paved with mentors and winds through Boston

the road for biomedicine startups

Marina Freytsis, PhD, supports the Technology and Innovation Development Office (TIDO) at Boston Children’s Hospital in seeking industry partnerships for Boston Children’s technologies and intellectual property.

Last week, Boston Children’s Hospital’s Technology and Innovation Development Office (TIDO) had the privilege of hosting a Boston Biomedical Innovation Center (B-BIC) panel discussion on the path from academia to entrepreneurship. We heard from Jeffrey Arnold (an angel investor), Jonathan Thon (an academic-turned-CEO) and Pamela Silver (an entrepreneurial professor).

My top five takeaways for budding entrepreneurs:

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Coordinated care for children on respiratory support saves money

CAPE program staff serve children who require home respiratory support.
Sofia Wylie, then age 2, is enrolled in the CAPE program and was part of the study. (Courtesy Natalia Wylie)

Children with high-risk, complex conditions — such as those who need ventilators to breathe — often receive disjointed care, scattered among many providers. This leads to emergency room visits and hospitalizations that could have been avoided. And once in the hospital, many children remain longer than they should for lack of good home care.

At home, families face daunting challenges. They must learn to use and maintain their children’s medical equipment and handle emergencies. They often have little or no access to home nursing services. Private insurance rarely covers home nursing for more than a limited number of hours, and Medicaid pays too little to attract qualified nurses. Many parents end up quitting their jobs to provide care.

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Giving voice a voice in health care

voice technology in healthcare

Physicians, like consumers in general, are increasingly embracing voice technology and smart home speakers. But does voice have a role in health care itself, beyond simple dictation of clinical notes? Boston Children’s Hospital is among those experimenting. The hospital’s Innovation and Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) describes its learnings in an article published today by Harvard Business Review.

After hosting a Voice in Healthcare hackathon in various simulated clinical environments in 2016, IDHA ran three pilots with voice-based systems. In the intensive care unit, clinicians used voice as a hands-free way to get basic information, saving time while maintaining infection control standards. The pediatric transplant team used voice prompts to guide them through the pre-operative organ-validation and checklist process.

voice technology in health care Harvard Business ReviewThe third, longest-running pilot is in patients’ homes: Through KidsMD, parents have logged more than 100,000 interactions with Amazon’s voice assistant, Alexa, receiving personalized guidance around common illnesses like ear infections, fever and the common cold. More types of wellness and disease-specific “skills” are in the works to create true home health hubs.

Voice has its limitations, but in a Boston Children’s survey, only 16% of physicians stated they would not try voice.

Read more in HBR and check out IDHA’s portfolio.

 

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Virtual reality tool lets kids voyage through their own bodies

HealthVoyager - stomach
Traditionally, doctors share the findings of invasive tests using printouts that are highly text-based and filled with medical jargon. Some may have static thumbnail illustrations, but all in all they’re not especially patient friendly.

Michael Docktor, MD, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, believed that if kids could really “see” inside themselves, they would have a better understanding of their disease and be more engaged in their treatment.

He connected with Klick Health, a health marketing and commercialization agency that develops digital solutions. Together, they created an entertaining “virtual reality” educational experience. It allows the physician to easily recreate a patient’s actual endoscopic procedure, and, like the Magic School Bus, enables kids to virtually tour their own bodies.

Boston Children’s and Klick Health officially unveiled the iPhone-friendly VR tool, called HealthVoyagerTM, in New York today.

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News Note: Why is this eye cancer making headlines?

This illustrations shows a catheter is used during intra-arterial chemotherapy for retinoblastoma.
During intra-arterial chemotherapy for retinoblastoma, a catheter is placed into the common femoral artery and threaded through a child’s vasculature to access the blood vessel of the affected eye and deliver a concentrated dose of chemotherapy. Illustration: Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s.

Retinoblastoma is a rare cancer that originates in the retina, the tissue in the back of the eye that converts light into visual information that is interpreted by the brain.

One retinoblastoma symptom in particular is finding itself in the spotlight. With a rise in social media use in recent years, retinoblastoma has attracted media attention for being a type of cancer that can sometimes be detected through photographs. Across the internet, news stories like this one abound in which friends or relatives have alerted parents to the potential risk of eye cancer after noticing that a child’s pupil appears white instead of red — a symptom called leukocoria — on photos posted to social media.

Fortunately, with proper diagnosis and treatment, 95 percent of children diagnosed with retinoblastoma can be cured. What’s more, a catheter-based treatment approach is now sparing patients from some of the side effects that can be expected from more traditional therapies.

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Building a better bubble: Engineering tweaks bring safe IV oxygen delivery closer to reality

thin-shelled engineered oxygen bubbles
(Courtesy Yifeng Peng, Boston Children’s Hospital)

Everything from food aspiration to an asthma attack to heart failure can cause a patient to die from asphyxia, or lack of oxygen. For more than a decade, the Translational Research Laboratory (TRL) of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Heart Center has been pursuing a dream: tiny, oxygen-filled bubbles that can be safely injected directly into the blood, resuscitating patients who can’t breathe.

The lab’s first generation of bubbles were made with a fatty acid, but the lipid shells weren’t stable enough for long-term storage or clinical use. The bubbles popped open too easily.

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Digital doctoring, big data and AI: Five takeaways

digital health

Big data and artificial intelligence are reshaping our world. Earlier this month, at Computefest 2018, organized by the Institute for Applied Computational Science at Harvard University, held the symposium, “The Digital Doctor: Health Care in an Age of AI and Big Data.” Speakers were:

  • Finale Doshi-Velez, PhD, Assistant Professor of Computer Science, Harvard University
  • Matt Might, Director, Hugh Kaul Personalized Medicine Institute, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • John Brownstein, PhD, Chief Innovation Officer and Director, Computational Epidemiology Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital
  • Marzyeh Ghassemi, PhD, Visiting Researcher, Google’s Verily; Postdoctoral Fellow, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Jennifer Chayes, Managing Director, Microsoft Research New England and New York City
  • Emery Brown, PhD, Professor of Medical Engineering and Computational Neuroscience, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Here are Vector’s five takeaways from the symposium:

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