Stories about: Innovation

Meeting an unmet need: A surgical implant that grows with a child

Depiction of a growth-accommodating implant expanding in sync with a child's growing heart.
Artist’s rendering showing how a braided, tubular implant could grow in sync with a child’s heart valve. Credit: Randal McKenzie

Medical implants can save lives by correcting structural defects in the heart and other organs. But until now, the use of medical implants in children has been complicated by the fact that fixed-size implants cannot expand in tune with a child’s natural growth.

To address this unmet surgical need, a team of researchers from Boston Children’s Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital have developed a growth-accommodating implant designed for use in a cardiac surgical procedure called a valve annuloplasty, which repairs leaking mitral and tricuspid valves in the heart. The innovation was reported today in Nature Biomedical Engineering.

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What do hospitals want from prospective digital health partners?

how digital health startups can better approach hospitals
How digital health startups can better approach hospitals.

How can the growing number of digital health startups sell their products to large-scale healthcare enterprises? Earlier this year, Rock Health, a San Francisco-based venture fund dedicated to digital health, conducted 30-minute interviews with executives at multiple startups and a few large healthcare organizations. They identified several key sticking points: navigating the internal complexities of hospitals, finding the right buyer, identifying the product’s value proposition and relevance to the hospital and avoiding “death by pilot.”

Now, in a Rock Health podcast, John Brownstein, PhD, Chief Innovation Officer at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation and Digital Health Accelerator and Adam Landman, MD, MS, MIS, MHS, Chief Information Officer at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and part of its Innovation Hub, offer further tips from the inside. They were hosted by Rock Health’s director of research, Megan Zweig.

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Dock Health’s shared ‘to do’ list for clinical teams — so basic, so necessary

Dock Health - a shared to-do list for clinical teams - could ease clinical burnout

While something as simple as a “to-do list” might seem trivial, a secure hub to store, prioritize and assign clinical and administrative tasks could be game-changing in healthcare.

Michael Docktor, MD, of Boston Children’s Hospital made this case yesterday at the Health 2.0 Conference in Santa Clara, Calif. He demonstrated Dock Health, a secure iOS mobile and web application that helps medical teams manage the numerous tasks that fall under clinical care. The idea was born in his gastroenterology practice at Boston Children’s and was incubated by the hospital’s Innovation and Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA).

“In an average day in clinic, I might see 15 patients and get 75 emails, 10 secure messages, three pages and five [electronic medical record] messages in my inbox,” Docktor writes on Medium. “Not too long ago, some emails were from frustrated colleagues, asking me to do something for a second or third time. Sadly, some were from parents of my patients, kindly reminding me that they were sitting in the lab waiting for the orders I forgot to place or trying to book their colonoscopy, for which I had forgotten to submit the form.”

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From clinician to clinician-innovator: Designing a surgical innovation fellowship

Ramos at Boston Children’s Hospital’s 3D printing facility (Photos: Katherine C. Cohen/Boston Children’s)

Gabriel Ramos, MD, is a second-year general surgery resident from Puerto Rico, is Boston Children’s Hospital’s first Surgical Innovation Fellow.

I have devoted considerable time and training to become a surgeon. But I recently took a detour from my surgical education to pursue a research fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital. I originally applied for a basic science research fellowship, but Dr. Heung Bae Kim – director of the Pediatric Transplant Center at Boston Children’s — described a new Surgical Innovation Fellowship. I decided to apply.

The early-stage nature of the fellowship meant I would not only learn about healthcare innovation, but also shape its future at Boston Children’s Hospital. The idea of learning more about the intersection of innovation, business and surgery was fascinating to me.

I was about to stop thinking as a surgeon – and start thinking as an innovator.

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From idea to product: 6 tips for surgical innovators

surgical innovation tips

Gabriel Ramos, MD, is a second-year general surgery resident from Puerto Rico and Boston Children’s Hospital’s first Surgical Innovation Fellow.

Learning how to think like a clinician-innovator is a journey that all clinicians should take. But be forewarned that the journey does not end with developing this new mindset. It starts with it.

What does it take to sustain innovation both inside and outside of the operating room? As a surgical innovation fellow at Boston Children’s Hospital, I learned to go back in time and immerse myself in the mindset of my toddler years, constantly asking “Why?” and “What if…?” This mindset is critical to sustaining innovation and solving clinical, research or administrative pain points.

Often, the hardest part of innovation is coming up with the right idea. Numerous factors must align, especially in surgical innovation, since the typical operating room is a difficult, distracting and stressful environment.

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Monitoring mitochondria: Laser device tells whether oxygen is sufficient

Shining a laser-based device on a tissue or organ may someday allow doctors to assess whether it’s getting enough oxygen, a team reports today in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Placed near the heart, the device can potentially predict life-threatening cardiac arrest in critically ill heart patients, according to tests in animal models. The technology was developed through a collaboration between Boston Children’s Hospital and device maker Pendar Technologies (Cambridge, Mass.).

“With current technologies, we cannot predict when a patient’s heart will stop,” says John Kheir, MD, of Boston Children’s Heart Center, who co-led the study. “We can examine heart function on the echocardiogram and measure blood pressure, but until the last second, the heart can compensate quite well for low oxygen conditions. Once cardiac arrest occurs, its consequences can be life-long, even when patients recover.”

In critically ill patients with compromised circulation or breathing, oxygen delivery is often impaired. The new device measures, in real time, whether enough oxygen is reaching the mitochondria, the organelles that provide cells with energy.

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Pediatric devices wanted: Boston Children’s Hospital and the Boston Pediatric Device Consortium launch $250,000 challenge

Boston Pediatric Device Strategic Partner Challenge opens

There’s generally little incentive for industry to develop medical devices for children: The pediatric market is small (most children are healthy) and clinical trials are harder to do in children.

“Innovation in medical devices with the potential to improve the health of children and adolescents continues to lag in comparison to those for adults,” says Pedro del Nido, MD, leader of the Boston Pediatric Device Consortium and Chief of Cardiac Surgery at Boston Children’s Hospital. 

This week, the Innovation and Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) at Boston Children’s Hospital and the Boston Pediatric Device Consortium (BPDC) announced a national challenge to try to remedy this problem. The Boston Pediatric Device Strategic Partner Challenge will award up to $50,000 to entrepreneurs and innovators seeking to create novel pediatric medical devices, from a total pool of up to $250,000.

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Moulage meets medicine: Making simulations feel real with special effects makeup

medical moulage - Maeve Geary at work
Photo: Katherine C. Cohen/Boston Children’s Hospital

Maeve Geary, BDes, to our knowledge, is the first PhD candidate to specialize in medical special effects simulation. A native of Belfast, Ireland, she completed a Bachelor of Design degree in Special Effects Development at the University of Bolton (Manchester, England). She has been with Boston Children’s Hospital’s Simulator Program, SIMPeds, since April 2016. At SIMPeds, she has contributed to a variety of custom “trainers” and is exploring whether increasing the realistic look and feel of mannequins impacts training and trainees’ ability to learn. Recently, she led the development of a trainer for urinary catheterization in infants — complete with visually and haptically accurate genitals, urethral opening and fat rolls.

It’s now apparent that treating medical mannequins with greater visual and haptic realism makes medical simulation training more effective for clinicians. Moulage, or special effects makeup, is an important part of making simulations feel real.

Here’s a quick tutorial in some very basic effects achieved with simple, readily available drugstore ingredients. Although much of my research is on complex fabrication techniques adapted from the film and television industry, these techniques are simple and accessible to all. (If you’re in Boston, attend our live demos this week!)

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Making leaps and bounds in 10 years of genome-wide association studies

A Broad Institute cartoon explains what SNPs have to do with genome-wide association studies
A clip from a Broad Institute infographic explains what researchers look for during genome-wide association studies. Download full infographic here. Credit: Susanna Hamilton/Karen Zusi of the Broad Institute.

In 2007, when the first genome-wide association studies (GWAS) got underway, researchers began to realize just how poorly they had previously been able to predict which genes might be related to certain diseases.

“I think we were all surprised how bad our candidate gene lists were,” said Joel Hirschhorn, MD, PhD, in a recent podcast with the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. Hirschhorn, a pioneer in GWAS, now leads the international Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits (GIANT) Consortium, which has analyzed the genomes of hundreds of thousands of people over the last several years.

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Building emotional strength with Mighteor: Will’s story

MIghteor

Will, a 13-year-old from Wisconsin, lives with high-functioning Asperger’s and faces difficulties recognizing and managing his emotions. He doesn’t like to talk about emotions he perceives as negative, and becomes upset when he doesn’t meet the high standards he sets for himself. These oachhallenges have made it difficult for Will to thrive in social situations.

Karen immediately began researching strategies, as many as she could find, to help Will manage his emotions. She found a Social Thinking program, as well as ABA therapy, both of them important opportunities for Will to increase his “social batting average,” as Karen puts it.

However, Will soon became resistant to using the strategies offered by these programs. Cues to calm down through deep breathing, for example, tended to create more frustration and anger and did not decrease his swearing, frustration or oppositional behaviors. Despite his ongoing work with an ABA therapist and the Social Thinking program, his academics started to suffer and he sometimes had to leave the classroom. “He would miss class, and then miss homework, and it would circle out of control,” says Karen.

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