Stories about: Market trends

Can we mass-produce platelets in the lab?

Lab-grown platelets could someday be given to patients
Activated platelets (IMAGE: ADOBE STOCK)

Most of us have somewhere around a trillion tiny platelets zooming around our bloodstreams. Joseph Italiano, PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Vascular Biology Program, calls them the “Swiss Army knives of the blood.” In addition to their key role in clotting, platelets are important in immunity, wound healing, chemical delivery, blood vessel development and more.

At healthcare facilities, platelets are in constant demand for patients with blood diseases, or those receiving radiation or chemotherapy for cancer. But unlike other blood products, platelets can’t be stored for more than a few days. If there’s a snowstorm or other emergency preventing donors from giving platelets, a hospital can easily run out. So researchers have been trying to make platelets in a lab setting.

Two teams at Boston Children’s Hospital are tackling the problem in slightly different ways.

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Do antibiotic-impregnated shunts reduce infection in hydrocephalus?

Antibiotic shunts compared with non-antibiotic shunts
(IMAGE: ADOBE STOCK)

Every year, nearly 400,000 children worldwide develop hydrocephalus, in which excess fluid accumulates in the brain. Many of these children have shunts placed to allow this fluid to drain. Antibiotic-impregnated shunts are widely championed as the best choice for treatment, but a new study calls their necessity into question.

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ctDNA: Bringing ‘liquid biopsies’ to pediatric solid tumors

Brian Crompton studies the use of ctDNA as an alternative way to biopsy pediatric solid tumors
Brian Crompton with Stephanie Meyer (left) and Kellsey Wuerthele (PHOTO: JOHN DEPUTY)

Our blood carries tiny amounts of DNA from broken-up cells. If we have cancer, some of that DNA comes from tumor cells. Studies performed with adult cancers have shown that this circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may offer crucial clues about tumor genetic mutations and how tumors respond to treatment.

Brian Crompton, MD, with colleagues at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and elsewhere, is now working to bring ctDNA “liquid biopsies” to pediatric solid tumors as well. The researchers hope that these blood tests will eventually improve early detection, choice of treatment and monitoring of young patients with these diseases without having to sample the tumor itself.

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Only a third of Federally mandated ‘post-marketing’ pediatric drug trials are complete

too few mandated pediatric drug trials are getting done
Despite new requirements, pediatric drug trials largely aren’t getting done. (ADOBE STOCK)

The FDA requires clinical studies of new drugs in pediatric populations, since many drugs developed for use in adults are also used in children. These studies are often “post-marketing” trials after the drug is approved in adults. But an audit by researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital found that only about a third of these mandatory trials were completed within an average of seven years. As a result, most new drug labels continue to lack child-specific information, and most FDA-approved drugs remain untested in children.

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Alexa: How are smart speakers helping patients, caregivers and clinicians?

Susan Bennett, the voice of Siri, emcees the Voice.Health Summit
Susan Bennett, the original voice of Apple’s Siri, emcees the 2018 Voice.Health Summit. (PHOTOS COURTESY IDHA/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL)

Sarah Lindenauer is product and portfolio manager for the Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Where can you hear the voice of Siri introducing a keynote speaker? Or see the developers of the first healthcare skill for voice present alongside leading pharmaceutical and health insurance companies? Experience demos of cutting-edge voice technologies from 20+ startups from around the world, in simulated healthcare environments?

It all went down October 17th in Boston at the Voice.Health Summit, presented by Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation and Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) as a run-up to the Connected Health Conference. More than 300 leading innovators in voice tech in healthcare came from around the world for a day of immersion and to answer the question, “What’s next?”

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Genomic sequencing for newborns: Are parents receptive?

BabySeqCasie Genetti, MS, CGC is a licensed genetic counselor with the Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research at Boston Children’s Hospital. She is first author of a recently published paper on the BabySeq Project.

The idea of genomic sequencing for every newborn has many in the scientific community buzzing with excitement, while leaving others wary of the ethical and social implications. But what do the parents think? The BabySeq Project has been exploring parental motivations and concerns while assessing their willingness to participate in a pilot newborn sequencing study.

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Putting patients first in the translational research pipeline

During a follow-up visit, pediatric hematologist/oncologist Sung-Yun Pai, MD, hugs a patient who received gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.
During a follow-up visit at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, pediatric hematologist/oncologist Sung-Yun Pai, MD, hugs a patient who received gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

This is part II of a two-part blog series recapping the 2018 BIO International Convention. Read part I: Forecasting the convergence of artificial intelligence and precision medicine.

The hope to improve people’s lives is what drives many members of industry and academia to bring new products and therapies to market. At the BIO International Convention last week in Boston, there was lots of discussion about how translational science intersects with patients’ needs and why the best therapeutic developmental pipelines are consistently putting patients first.

As a case in point, Mustafa Sahin, MD, PhD, of Boston Children’s discussed his work to improve testing and translation of new therapies for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). As a member of PACT (Preclinical Autism Consortium for Therapeutics) and director of Boston Children’s Translational Neuroscience Program, Sahin aims to bridge the gap between drug discovery and clinical translation.

“Our mission is to de-risk entry of new therapies in the ASD drug discovery and development space,” said Sahin, who is also a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School.

One big challenge, says Sahin, is knowing how well — or how poorly — autism therapies are actually affecting people with ASD. Externally, ASD is recognized by its core symptoms of repetitive behaviors and social deficits.

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Forecasting the convergence of artificial intelligence and precision medicine

Image of artificial DNA, which in combination with other artificial intelligence could contribute to an artificial model of the immune system
Will an artificial model of the immune system be the key to discovering new, precision vaccines?

This is part I of a two-part blog series recapping the 2018 BIO International Convention.

At the 2018 BIO International Convention last week, it was clear what’s provoking scientific minds in industry and academia — or at least those of the Guinness-world-record-making 16,000 people in attendance. Artificial intelligence, machine learning and their implications for tailor-made medicine bubbled up across all BIO’s educational tracks and a majority of discussions about the future state of biotechnology. Panelists from Boston Children’s Hospital also contributed their insights to what’s brewing at the intersection of these burgeoning fields.

Isaac Kohane, MD, PhD, former chair of Boston Children’s Computational Health and Informatics Program, spoke on a panel about how large-scale patient data — if properly harnessed and analyzed for health and disease trends — is a virtual goldmine for precision medicine insights. Patterns gleaned from population health data or electronic health records, for example, could help identify which subgroups of patients who might respond better to specific therapies.

According to Kohane, who is currently the Marion J. Nelson Professor of Biomedical Informatics and Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School (HMS), we will soon be leveraging artificial intelligence to go through patient records and determine exactly what doctors were thinking when they saw patients.

“We’ve seen again and again that data abstraction by artificial intelligence is better than abstraction by human analysts when performed at the scale of millions of clinical notes across thousands of patients,” said Kohane.

And based on what we heard at BIO, artificial intelligence will revolutionize more than patient data mining. It will also transform the way we design precision therapeutics — and even vaccines — from the ground up.

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Very-low-carb diet can safely curb blood sugar in type 1 diabetes, study suggests

very-low-carb diet shows promise in type 1 diabetes

David Ludwig, MD, PhD, an endocrinologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, has written popular books espousing a low-glycemic, low-carbohydrate diet for weight control. He has argued that high-glycemic diets are contributing to the epidemic of type 2 diabetes.  But he hadn’t given much thought to carbohydrate restriction for type 1 diabetes until 2016.

At a conference, Ludwig met a surgeon with type 1 diabetes who maintains normal hemoglobin A1c levels (indicating high blood sugar control) on a very-low-carbohydrate diet. This surprised and impressed him: he had never seen any patient with type 1 diabetes able to completely normalize their hemoglobin A1cs. Moreover, most diabetes experts discourage very-low-carb diets, believing they pose a risk for hypoglycemia, or a dangerous drop in blood sugar.

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News Note: A fresh perspective on RNA with big implications for drug development 

RNA-based drugs are the future of therapeuticsRibonucleic acid, or RNA, has long been underappreciated for its role in gene expression. Until recent years, RNA has been thought of merely as a messenger, shuttling DNA’s instructions to the genetic machinery that synthesizes proteins.

But new discoveries of RNA functions, modifications and its ability to transcribe sections of the genome that were previously considered “junk DNA” has led to the discovery of a huge number of new druggable targets.

These new insights into RNA’s complex purposes have largely been uncovered through ever-increasingly sensitive and affordable sequencing methods. As a result, RNA-based drugs now stand to greatly extend our ability to treat diseases beyond the scope of what’s possible with small molecules and biologics.

Although several RND-based drug approaches have already been established, some barriers still prevent these strategies from working broadly. In a review paper for Nature Structural and Molecular Biology, Judy Lieberman, MD, PhD, of the Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine of Boston Children’s Hospital, lays out where RNA-based drug development currently stands.

Lieberman, who has helped pioneer the RNA-based drug revolution herself, was the first scientist to show in an animal disease model that small, double-stranded RNAs could be used as drugs and leveraged to knock down genes in cells.

Read Lieberman’s review: “Tapping the RNA world for therapeutics.”

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