Stories about: Market trends

Maintaining mitochondria in neurons: A new lens for neurodegenerative disorders

cartoon of mitochondria being transported in neurons - part of mitostasis
In some neurons, mitochondria must travel several feet along an axon. (Elena Hartley illustration)

Tom Schwarz, PhD, is a neuroscientist at Boston Children’s Hospital’s F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center, focusing on the cell biology of neurons. Tess Joosse is a biology major at Oberlin College. This article is condensed from a recent review article by Schwarz and Thomas Misgeld (Technical University of Munich).

Like all cells, the neurons of our nervous system depend on mitochondria to generate energy. Mitochondria need constant rejuvenation and turnover, and that’s especially true in neurons because of their high energy needs for signaling and “firing.” Mitochondria are especially abundant at presynaptic sites — the tips of axons that form synapses or junctions with other neurons and release neurotransmitters.

But the process of maintaining mitochondrial number and quality, known as mitostasis, also poses particular challenges in neurons. Increasingly, mitostasis is providing a helpful lens for understanding neurodegenerative disorders. Problems with mitostasis are implicated in Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, ALS, autism, stroke, multiple sclerosis, hypoxia and more.

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Digital doctoring, big data and AI: Five takeaways

digital health

Big data and artificial intelligence are reshaping our world. Earlier this month, at Computefest 2018, organized by the Institute for Applied Computational Science at Harvard University, held the symposium, “The Digital Doctor: Health Care in an Age of AI and Big Data.” Speakers were:

  • Finale Doshi-Velez, PhD, Assistant Professor of Computer Science, Harvard University
  • Matt Might, Director, Hugh Kaul Personalized Medicine Institute, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • John Brownstein, PhD, Chief Innovation Officer and Director, Computational Epidemiology Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital
  • Marzyeh Ghassemi, PhD, Visiting Researcher, Google’s Verily; Postdoctoral Fellow, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Jennifer Chayes, Managing Director, Microsoft Research New England and New York City
  • Emery Brown, PhD, Professor of Medical Engineering and Computational Neuroscience, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Here are Vector’s five takeaways from the symposium:

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Science and medicine in 2018: What’s the forecast?

2018 predictions for biomedicine

Vector consulted its many informants to find out which way the wind will blow in 2018. Here are their predictions for what to expect in genetics, stem cell research, immunology and more.


Gene-based therapies mature

We will continue to see successes in 2018 reflecting the maturation of gene therapy as a viable, generalizable platform for curing many rare diseases. Also, we will see exciting new applications of other maturing platforms, like CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing and oligonucleotide therapies for neurologic diseases, building on the success of nusinersen for spinal muscular atrophy.

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What do hospitals want from prospective digital health partners?

how digital health startups can better approach hospitals
How digital health startups can better approach hospitals.

How can the growing number of digital health startups sell their products to large-scale healthcare enterprises? Earlier this year, Rock Health, a San Francisco-based venture fund dedicated to digital health, conducted 30-minute interviews with executives at multiple startups and a few large healthcare organizations. They identified several key sticking points: navigating the internal complexities of hospitals, finding the right buyer, identifying the product’s value proposition and relevance to the hospital and avoiding “death by pilot.”

Now, in a Rock Health podcast, John Brownstein, PhD, Chief Innovation Officer at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation and Digital Health Accelerator and Adam Landman, MD, MS, MIS, MHS, Chief Information Officer at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and part of its Innovation Hub, offer further tips from the inside. They were hosted by Rock Health’s director of research, Megan Zweig.

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In search of young medical geneticists

Nina Gold, MD, is Chief Resident of Medical Genetics at Boston Children’s Hospital.

During a quiet stretch of my final year in medical school, I read Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories. A master observer, the detective found secrets in wrinkles of clothes, tints of hair, scents of perfume, never satisfied until the truth was revealed. Sherlock was, simply, an expert diagnostician.

In the spring of 2014, I became the first student in my medical school to pursue residency training in a combined pediatrics and medical genetics program. Like Sherlock, pediatric geneticists are stalwart investigators. They are often called into a case long after other consultants and tasked with bringing a family’s diagnostic odyssey to an end. But unlike the emotionally obtuse fictional detective, geneticists must describe their findings with empathy and clarity to concerned families after they solve a mystery.

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If I knew then what I know now: The need for infrastructure to enable precision medicine

precision medicine - closing the infrastructure loop
For precision medicine to happen, we need to be able to close the loop when genetic discoveries are made.

Catherine Brownstein, MPH, PhD, is scientific director of The Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research at Boston Children’s Hospital. Kelsey Graber, MSc, is a research assistant in the Developmental Neuropsychiatry Program. Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich, MD, is director of the Developmental Neuropsychiatry Program at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Research implicating rare genetic variants in medical and psychiatric diseases is quickly accumulating. This expanding knowledge should be taken into account when making treatment decisions for patients carrying these variants — as well as other family members — even when that knowledge comes after the patient is tested. But all too often, medical institutions are unable to go back and update the information given to families. We need a better infrastructure to enable precision medicine.

This problem recently surfaced in our psychiatry practice. It came to our attention because of a young boy with mild coordination delays and learning disabilities. At age 6, he started experiencing daily hallucinations such as voices telling him to kill his classmates.

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Robot-enhanced neurosurgery for nimbler seizure mapping

implanting electrodes for seizure monitoring, with robotic assistance
Scellig Stone and Joseph Madsen in surgery with the robot.

Head shaved, a little boy rests on the operating table, deep under anesthesia. His parents have brought him to Boston Children’s Hospital in hopes of determining the cause of his seizures. Now, neurosurgeons Scellig Stone, MD, PhD, Joseph Madsen, MD, and their colleagues in the Epilepsy Center are performing a procedure designed to monitor seizure activity in the 3-year-old’s brain.

But as the team members crowd around the table, they’re not alone. With the push of a button, a large robotic arm rotates and lowers right next to the boy’s head, helping the physicians pinpoint the precise location to drill. “This is a real game-changer,” murmurs one of the clinicians observing the surgery. “It’s going to transform the way we practice.”

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Building precision medicine: Power to the patients

Tools to build precision medicinePrecision medicine involves the development and application of targeted therapeutics based on patients’ genomes, lifestyles and environments. The recent conference on precision medicine at Harvard Medical School highlighted a few challenges in scaling up this process.

To help further precision medicine, the Obama administration and NIH launched the All of Us program, registrations for which are slated to start later this year. Its aim is to collect health data from one million Americans.

But the conference also highlighted several tools that patients can use proactively to collect, share and analyze their own data and use it to improve their own health — and contribute to precision medicine as citizen scientists.

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Three challenges precision medicine faces before it can scale up

Different aspects of precision medicine therapyDoctors, scientists, consumers, entrepreneurs and others came together recently for the Precision Medicine 2017 symposium at Harvard Medical School, now in its third year. This year’s theme was “breakaway business models.” What are challenges in developing targeted treatments based on clinical and genetic data, and how do we overcome them?

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Under the hood of healthcare innovation: Jared Hawkins and the digital phenotype

Jared Hawkins Boston Children's Hospital

What does it take to change healthcare for the better? In the second of a two-part series on digital health innovators at Boston Children’s Hospital, we profile Jared Hawkins, MMSc, PhD. Like Gajen Sunthara, MSc, featured in part one, Hawkins was named among MedTech Boston’s 40 Under 40 Healthcare Innovators for 2017.

Jared Hawkins, director of informatics at Boston Children’s Innovation and Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA), brings a formidable skill set to his work. With a PhD in Immunology from Tufts University School of Medicine and an MMSc in Biomedical Informatics from Harvard Medical School, his background combines biomedical research (immunology, virology, oncology, genomics) with data science, visualization, computational modeling and software development.

His current work spans an equally diverse range of topics, touching on population and public health, patient experience, decision support and pharmacogenomics. A faculty member in the Computational Health Informatics Program, Hawkins is wired into the digital health ecosystem. He serves as a scientific advisor and co-founder of Raiing Medical (home temperature and fertility tracking) and is the head of engineering and co-founder of Circulation (non-emergency medical transportation via Uber).

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