Stories about: Pediatrics

SIDS associated with higher blood serotonin levels

A baby sleeping on its back, which is the safest sleeping position to prevent SIDS
The Safe to Sleep campaign has helped reduce SIDS deaths, but underlying causes for SIDS have largely remained mysterious.

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) accounts for the greatest share of deaths in children between the ages of 1 and 12 months. What if a blood test could explain a third of SIDS deaths – and in the future, help prevent them? New findings by a Boston Children’s Hospital team show that an increased level of serotonin in blood serum may underpin some SIDS deaths and suggests the possibility that this biological vulnerability may one day be detected in the blood of living infants.

While there are known risk factors for SIDS — such as sleeping face-down or on soft surfaces — how and why such seemingly minor threats kill some children, and not others, remains a mystery.

“Research on the underlying pathology of SIDS is critical to further our understanding of the biological mechanisms contributing to a SIDS death,” says Robin Haynes, PhD, a researcher in the Department of Pathology at Boston Children’s Hospital.

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Can we improve neuropsychiatric outcomes in children with congenital heart disease?

Jane Newburger studies neurodevelopment in children with congenital heart defects
Jane Newburger, MD, has dedicated her career to helping children with heart defects reach their full potential.

About 1 out of 100 babies are born with a congenital heart defects. Thanks to medical and surgical advances, these children usually survive into adulthood, but they are often left with developmental, behavioral or learning challenges.

Children with “single-ventricle” defects — in which one of the heart’s two pumping chambers is too small or weak to function properly — are especially at risk for neurodevelopmental problems. “Single-ventricle physiology creates cerebrovascular hemodynamics that can reduce oxygen delivery to the brain,” explains Jane Newburger, MD, MPH, director of the Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Program at Boston Children’s Hospital.

How does this play out in adolescence? In three recent studies, Boston Children’s Heart Center collaborated with the departments of Neurology and Psychiatry to track neurodevelopmental outcomes after corrective Fontan operations. They evaluated preteens and teens as old as 19 — the longest follow-up to date.

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An unclassified tumor — with a precisely targeted therapy

Jesus (who received targeted therapy for his tumor) pictured with his father
Jesus and his father, Nathaneal

Early last year, at his home in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Jesus Apolinaris Cruz’s leg hurt so much he could barely sleep. “All day,” the 13-year-old recalls. “It was constant pain.” His parents took him to two local pediatricians, who examined him, drew blood, tested his platelets. No diagnosis. Finally, in April 2016, a physician ordered an MRI. No wonder Jesus’s leg hurt. He had a large, cancerous tumor lodged in his hip.

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Webchat to highlight what’s new in pediatric brain tumors

pediatric brain tumors, child MRI

Last September, the National Center for Health Statistics reported that brain tumors have overtaken the much more common leukemia as the leading cause of death from pediatric cancer. Although progress has been made and the promise of more progress is on the horizon, the cure rate for childhood brain tumors lags behind a number of other pediatric cancers.

As pediatric neuro-oncologist Peter Manley, MD, of Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center told Live Science, new research on cancer genomics “is so impressive that my feeling is that we will continue to see a decline in deaths.”

To mark Brain Tumor Awareness Month, Mark Kieran, MD, PhD, clinical director of the Brain Tumor Center at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s, will host a webchat on Monday, May 22 (3:30 p.m. ET). The live chat will highlight the latest research and treatments for pediatric brain tumors. Here’s a look back at some recent developments:

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One family, one researcher: How Mikey’s journey is fueling an attack on DIPG

Picture of Mikey on 11th birthday, shortly after his DIPG diagnosis
Mikey and his family at his 11th birthday party, just one week after he was diagnosed with DIPG, a devastating tumor in his brain stem. Since Mikey’s passing in 2008, his family has been committed to supporting DIPG research.

“It’s a brutal disease; there’s just no other way to describe DIPG,” says Steve Czech. “And what’s crazy is that there aren’t many treatment options because it’s such a rare, orphan disease.”

Czech’s son, Mikey, was diagnosed with a diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) on Jan. 6, 2008. It was Mikey’s 11th birthday. The fast growing and difficult-to-treat brainstem tumors are diagnosed in approximately 300 children in the U.S. each year.

Sadly, the virtually incurable disease comes with a poor prognosis for most children. The location of DIPG tumors in the brainstem — which controls many of the body’s involuntary functions, such as breathing — has posed a huge challenge to successful treatment thus far.

“Typically, they give kids about nine months,” says Czech. “Our lives changed forever the day that Mikey was diagnosed.”

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GALLERY: Forecasting the future of pediatric hematology/oncology

Title image for pediatric hematology/oncology predictionsRecently, the annual ASPHO (American Society for Pediatric Hematology/Oncology) meeting brought together more than 1,100 pediatric hematologists and oncologists, including a team from the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancers and Blood Disorders Center. Some of the delegates from Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s included:

Based on their discussions with their peers, these are their key takeaways from the meeting:

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Can virtual reality headsets save vision in people with lazy eye?

Luminopia amblyopia virtual reality
IDHA’s Matt Murphy tries out Luminopia’s VR headset with Dean Travers (photo: Greb Weintraub)

Three to five percent of the population has amblyopia, a.k.a. lazy eye, in which a healthy eye never “learns” to see because isn’t used. This usually happens because of a focusing problem or subtle misalignment of that eye. The brain learns to ignore input from that eye, and unless this is noticed early, it weakens and can slowly go blind.

“When I can diagnose amblyopia early enough, I can treat it with an eye patch or eye drops to block the ‘good’ eye,” says David Hunter, MD, PhD, chief of ophthalmology at Boston Children’s Hospital. “This gives the eye with amblyopia time to catch up.”

Unfortunately, eye patching doesn’t work well at older ages, and kids hate the socially stigmatizing patches, which often need to be worn for more than a year. As Dean Travers, cofounder of Luminopia, put it at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovators’ Showcase last week, “Being a pirate isn’t cool for very long.”

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New dataset reveals the individuality of childhood cancers

Tumor cells, like the ones pictured here, have unique genetic profiles across childhood cancers
Imaging of tumor cells. A new dataset, one of the largest of its kind, contains the genomic profiles of 1,215 pediatric tumors.

Childhood cancers are rare and account for about one percent of U.S. cancer diagnoses. They differ from adult tumors in that they often arise from many more diverse kinds of cells, including embryonal tissues, sex-cord stromal cells of the ovary or testis, the brain’s neural and glial cells and more.

Yet although improved tumor detection and treatment have increased survival rates for many different cancer subtypes, more than 1,900 children across the U.S. still lose their battle each year.

A new dataset — comprising the genomic profiles of a huge array of pediatric tumors — could help change that.

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Effective vaccination of newborns: Getting closer to the dream

 

newborn vaccines global health

In many parts of the world, babies have just one chance to be vaccinated: when they’re born. Unfortunately, newborns’ young immune systems don’t respond well to most vaccines. That’s why, in the U.S., most immunizations start at two months of age.

Currently, only BCG, polio vaccine and hepatitis B vaccines work in newborns, and the last two require multiple doses. But new research raises the possibility of one-shot vaccinations at birth — with huge implications for reducing infant mortality.

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Lack of drug testing in kids exposes them to off-label harm

drug testing in children
Loopholes in current legislation let drug companies defer testing their products in children, so the majority of prescriptions are off-label.

Florence T. Bourgeois MD, MPH, is assistant professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine at Harvard Medical School, faculty in the Computational Health Informatics Program, and Scientific Director of the Biobank for Health Discovery at Boston Children’s Hospital

Every day, more than half of children seen in outpatient clinics are prescribed a medication that is not FDA approved for the child’s age or diagnosis. Such off-label prescribing is widespread across pediatric conditions and treatment settings and as many as 90 percent of pediatricians have knowingly prescribed off-label medications.

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