Stories about: Therapeutics

Effective vaccination of newborns: Getting closer to the dream

 

newborn vaccines global health

In many parts of the world, babies have just one chance to be vaccinated: when they’re born. Unfortunately, newborns’ young immune systems don’t respond well to most vaccines. That’s why, in the U.S., most immunizations start at two months of age.

Currently, only BCG, polio vaccine and hepatitis B vaccines work in newborns, and the last two require multiple doses. But new research raises the possibility of one-shot vaccinations at birth — with huge implications for reducing infant mortality.

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Discovering a rare anemia in time to save an infant’s life

Illustration of the erythropoietin hormone. A newly-discovered genetic mutation, which switches one amino acid in EPO's structure, resulted in two cases of rare anemia.
An illustration showing the structure of a cell-signaling cytokine called erythropoietin (EPO). It has long been thought that when EPO binds with its receptor, EPOR, it functions like an on/off switch, triggering red blood cell production. New findings suggest that this process is more nuanced than previously thought; even slight variations to cytokines like EPO can cause disease.

While researching a rare blood disorder called Diamond-Blackfan anemia, scientists stumbled upon an even rarer anemia caused by a previously-unknown genetic mutation. During their investigation, the team of scientists — from the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT and Yale University — had the relatively unusual opportunity to develop an “on-the-fly” therapy.

As they analyzed the genes of one boy who had died from the newly-discovered blood disorder, the team’s findings allowed them to help save the life of his infant sister, who was also born with the same genetic mutation. The results were recently reported in Cell.

“We had a unique opportunity here to do research, and turn it back to a patient right away,” says Vijay Sankaran, MD, PhD, the paper’s co-corresponding author and a principal investigator at the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. “It’s incredibly rewarding to be able to bring research full circle to impact a patient’s life.”

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Mining similarities in pediatric and canine bone cancer to help both children and pets

dogs aid fight against osteosarcoma

In March 2016, Ollie, a therapy dog at Boston Children’s Hospital, paid a bedside visit to 7-year-old Carter Mock. The pug and the boy had something in common: Both had lost limbs to the bone cancer osteosarcoma. Ollie’s left front leg had been amputated at the shoulder, while Carter had just had a new knee fashioned from his ankle in a procedure called rotationplasty.

Biologically, the osteosarcoma that dogs develop is remarkably similar to osteosarcoma in children and youths. The tumors develop primarily in the long bones, and the spread of tumor cells to the lungs represents the most significant threat and challenge. Similar chemotherapy agents are used in both dogs and human patients to kill residual cancer cells. Researchers are now mining these similarities in a quest for new treatments to benefit pets and people alike.

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News Note: Steroids could be counter-productive in severe asthma

severe asthma
Nine years old kid with allergic asthma, inhaling his medication through spacer while looking at with his wide opened eyes perhaps he is getting energy boost

Some 10 to 15 percent of people with asthma have severe disease that medications can’t control. A deep-dive multicenter study finds differences in these patients’ immune systems that may explain why increased dosages of corticosteroids don’t help — and could lead to steroids doing more harm than good. Findings appear online this week in Science Immunology.

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Transfusing engineered red blood cells to protect against autoimmune disease

Red blood cells, pictured here, could be engineered to protect against autoimmune disease
Transfusions of engineered red blood cells could help prevent and/or treat autoimmune disease.

Autoimmune disease is usually treated using general immunosuppressants. But this non-targeted therapy leaves the body more susceptible to infection and other life-threatening diseases.

Now, scientists at Boston Children’s Hospital, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research think they may have found a targeted way to protect the body from autoimmune disease. Their approach, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, uses transfusions of engineered red blood cells to re-train the immune system. Early experiments in mice have already shown that the approach can prevent — and even reverse — clinical signs of two autoimmune diseases: a multiple-sclerosis (MS)-like condition and Type 1 diabetes.

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Gene therapy: The promise, the reality, the future

gene therapy
(Graphs courtesy Alexandra Biffi, Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center)

Gene therapy stalled in the early 2000s as adverse effects came to light in European trials (leukemias triggered by the gene delivery vector) and following the 1999 death of U.S. patient Jesse Gelsinger. But after 30 years of development, and with the advent of safer vectors, gene therapy is becoming a clinical reality. It falls into two main categories:

  • In vivo: Direct injection of the gene therapy vector, carrying the desired gene, into the bloodstream or target organ.
  • Ex vivo: Removal of a patient’s cells, treating the cells with gene therapy, and reinfusing them back into the patient, as in hematopoietic stem cell transplant and CAR T-cell therapy.

A recent panel at Boston Children’s Hospital, hosted by the hospital’s Technology and Innovation Development Office (TIDO), explored where gene therapy is and where it’s going. Here were the key takeaways:

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With no time to lose, parents drive CMT4J gene therapy forward

CMT4J
Talia Duff’s disorder, CMT4J, is a rare form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth. It has been modeled in mice that will soon undergo a test of gene therapy, largely through her parents’ behind-the-scenes work.

In honor of Rare Disease Day (Feb. 28), we salute “citizen scientists” Jocelyn and John Duff.

When Talia Duff was born, her parents realized life would be different, but still joyful. They were quickly adopted by the Down syndrome parent community and fell in love with Talia and her bright smile.

But when Talia was about four, it was clear she had a true problem. She started losing strength in her arms and legs. When she got sick, which was often, the weakness seemed to accelerate.

Talia was initially diagnosed with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), an autoimmune disease in which the body attacks its own nerve fibers. Treated with IV immunoglobulin infusions to curb the inflammation, she seemed to grow stronger — but only for a time. Adding prednisone, a steroid, seemed to help. But it also caused bone loss, and Talia began having spine fractures.

“We tried a lot of different things, but she never got 100 percent better,” says Regina Laine, NP, who has been following Talia in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Neuromuscular Center the past several years, together with Basil Darras, MD.That’s when we decided to readdress the possibility that it was genetic.”

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A gene therapy advance for muscle-wasting myotubular myopathy

X-linked myotubular myopathy XLMTM gene therapy
Nibs, a carrier of MTM whose descendants provided the basis for the gene therapy study. (Read more of her story.)

For more than two decades, Alan Beggs, PhD, at Boston Children’s Hospital has explored the genetic causes of congenital myopathies, disorders that weaken children’s muscles, and investigated how the mutations lead to muscle weakness. For one life-threatening disorder, X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM), the work is approaching potential payoff, in the form of a clinical gene therapy trial.

Boys with XLMTM are born so weak that they are dependent on ventilators and feeding tubes to survive. Almost half die before 18 months of age.

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Stem cell workaround cracks open new leads in Diamond Blackfan anemia

Diamond Blackfan anemia iPS cells hematopoietic progenitor cells
Though not bona-fide stem cells, hematopoietic progenitor cells produce red blood cells when exposed to certain chemicals. Could some of these compounds lead to new drugs for Diamond Blackfan anemia?

Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) has long been a disease waiting for a cure. First described in 1938 by Louis K. Diamond, MD, of Boston Children’s Hospital and his mentor, Kenneth Blackfan, MD, the rare, severe blood disorder prevents the bone marrow from making enough red blood cells. It’s been linked to mutations affecting a variety of proteins in ribosomes, the cellular organelles that themselves build proteins. The first mutation was reported in 1999.

But scientists have been unable to connect the dots and turn that knowledge into new treatments for DBA. Steroids are still the mainstay of care, and they help only about half of patients. Some people eventually stop responding, and many are forced onto lifelong blood transfusions.

Researchers have tried for years to isolate and study patients’ blood stem cells, hoping to recapture the disease process and gather new therapeutic leads. Some blood stem cells have been isolated, but they’re very rare and can’t be replicated in enough numbers to be useful for research.

Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, first created in 2006 from donor skin cells, seemed to raise new hope. They can theoretically generate virtually any specialized cell, allowing scientists model a patient’s disease in a dish and test potential drugs.

There’s been just one hitch. “People quickly ran into problems with blood,” says hematology researcher Sergei Doulatov, PhD. “iPS cells have been hard to instruct when it comes to making blood cells.”

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Gene therapy restores whisper-fine hearing, balance in Usher syndrome mice

gene therapy for deafness
Sensory hair cells contain tiny cilia that get wiggled by incoming sound waves, sparking a signal to the brain that ultimately translates to hearing. Gene therapy restored this tidy “V” formation. (Credit: Gwenaelle Géléoc and Artur Indzkykulian)

The ear is a part of the body that’s readily accessible to gene therapy: You can inject a gene delivery vector (typically a harmless virus) and it has a good chance of staying put. But will it ferry the corrected gene into the cells of the hearing and/or vestibular organs where it’s most needed?

Back in 2015, a Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School team reported using gene therapy to restore rudimentary hearing in mice with genetic deafness. Previously unresponsive mice began jumping when exposed to abrupt loud sounds. But the vector used could get the corrected genes only into the cochlea’s inner hair cells. To really restore significant hearing, the outer hair cells need to be treated too.

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