Stories about: 3D printing

Training neurosurgeons in a rare hydrocephalus procedure, with a little help from Hollywood

ETV trainer

A 4-year-old has a progressively enlarging head and loss of developmental milestones: a clear case of hydrocephalus. He undergoes a minimally invasive endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) to drain off the trapped cerebrospinal fluid.

This requires puncturing the floor of the brain’s third ventricle (fluid-filled cavity) with an endoscope — while avoiding a lethal tear in the basilar artery, which lies perilously close.

There are no good neurosurgical training models for this rare and scary operation.

“We semi-blindly poke a hole through the ventricle floor,” says Benjamin Warf, MD, director of Neonatal and Congenital Anomaly Neurosurgery at Boston Children’s Hospital. “To make the technique safer and to be able to train more people, it would be very helpful to make that hole in a way that’s less anxiety-provoking.”

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From napkin sketch to new product: Rapid prototyping service speeds medical device development

rapid 3D prototyping services at hospitals
These custom devices hold fiber optic probes used to measure blood oxygenation in newborns. (Courtesy Noah Schulz, SIMPeds)

Some people bring data and completed designs. Others just bring simple sketches. “We have this idea for this device,” they begin. “It may only help 15 kids a year, but it could really improve their quality of life.”

Other people bring only a clinical need: “We need something to keep babies lying still after their procedure, without having to medicate them.”

To make these ideas more tangible and help launch them down a formal development path, the Boston Children’s Hospital Simulator Program, SIMPeds, has begun making its 3D printing and engineering service available to help hospital staff rapidly prototype new devices.

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3-D printed models may soon guide one-of-a-kind pediatric heart operations

Photo credit: Bryce Vickmark, MIT News
Photo credit: Bryce Vickmark, MIT News

No two hearts are alike. It sounds like poetry, but this adage takes on a special meaning for pediatric cardiac surgeons.

Children born with congenital heart disease have unique cardiac anatomies. To correct them, surgeons need a nuanced understanding of each structure and chamber of the heart, and for decades have relied on (increasingly sophisticated) imaging technology.

Soon, though, they will be able to touch, turn and view replicas of their patients’ hearts up close. Researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital and MIT have jointly designed a computer program that can convert MRI scans of a patient’s heart into 3-D physical models.

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Hold me, turn me: 3D printed models help doctors rehearse tricky cerebrovascular procedures

Vein of Galen-3D-20140418_Orbach-croppedFour children with life-threatening malformations of blood vessels in the brain appear to be the first to benefit from 3D printing of their anatomy before undergoing high-risk corrective procedures.

The children, ranging from 2 months to 16 years old, all posed particular treatment challenges: cerebrovascular disease often entails complex tangles of vessels in sensitive brain areas.

“These children had unique anatomy with deep vessels that were very tricky to operate on,” says Boston Children’s neurosurgeon Edward Smith, MD, senior author of the paper and co-director of the hospital’s Cerebrovascular Surgery and Interventions Center. “The 3D-printed models allowed us to rehearse the cases beforehand and reduce operative risk as much as we could. You can physically hold the 3D models, view them from different angles, practice the operation with real instruments and get tactile feedback.”

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3D printing helps doctors plan a toddler’s craniofacial surgery

Plastic surgeon John Meara, MD, and neurosurgeon Mark Proctor, MD, in the Craniofacial Anomalies Program at Boston Children’s Hospital are early adopters of 3D printing technology. They put it to good use in caring for Violet, a buoyant toddler who was diagnosed before birth with a rare, complicated skull and facial defect. Using CT images, and with the help of the hospital’s Simulator Program, they were able to build a series of plastic 3D models of Violet’s skull and rehearse her surgery—months before Violet arrived from Oregon.

“I actually feel like I know her, because I’ve seen that model change and grow over the last several months,” said Meara just before the surgery. “We can see and feel the trajectory of where we will have to make certain cuts, and that’s never been possible before.”

Read more on 3D printing in medicine in the Boston Globe. Follow Violet’s journey in this four-part series, and in The New York Times.

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15 health care predictions for 2015

healthcare predictions
2014 continued to see massive evolution in health care—from digital health innovations to the maturation of technologies in genomics, genome editing and regenerative medicine to the configuration of the health care system itself. We asked leaders from the clinical, research and business corners of Boston Children’s Hospital to weigh in with their forecasts for 2015. Click “Full story” for them all, or jump to:
The consumer movement in health care
Evolving care models
Genomics in medicine
Stem cell therapeutics
Therapeutic development
New technology
Biomedical research

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3D printing puts patients in surgeons’ hands. Literally.

3D printed plastic model of a patient's skull John Meara craniofacial anomaliesA picture may be worth a thousand words, but there’s something about holding an object in your hands that’s worth so much more. I realized this when John Meara, MD, DMD, handed me the skull of one of his patients.

I turned it over in my hands while Meara, Boston Children’s Hospital’s plastic surgeon-in-chief, pointed out features like the cranium’s asymmetric shape and the face’s malformed left orbit.

Mind you, it wasn’t actually Meara’s patient’s skull in my hands. In reality, I was holding a high-resolution, plastic 3D model printed from the patient’s CT scans.

The printer that made that model—and several other models I saw in the last month—is the centerpiece of a new in-house 3D printing service being built by Peter Weinstock, MD, PhD, and Boston Children’s Simulator Program.

3D printing technology has exploded in the last few years, to the point where anyone can buy a 3D printer like the MakerBot for a couple of thousand dollars or order 3D printed products from services like Shapeways. Adobe even recently added 3D printing support to Photoshop.

And 3D printing is already making a mark on medicine.

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10 trends to watch in pediatric medicine: Part 2

Sleuthing out pediatric trendsIn Part 1 last week, Vector took a look at digital health apps, telemedicine, genomics, phenomics and new behavioral diagnostics as transformative trends in pediatrics. This week, we complete our list. These posts will also appear as an article in the fall issue of Children’s Hospitals Today magazine.

6. New pharma research and development (R&D) models

Academic medical centers have always worked with the pharmaceutical industry but never so closely as now. In the old model, industry drove therapeutic development. A company might fund an academic project or supply reagents, but the relationship generally ended with the project (and publication of a paper).

Now, with drug pipelines drying up and R&D costs rising, Big Pharma is under pressure to change. New industry-academia collaborations are forging creative partnerships, altering how both parties do business. The new models are allowing hospital researchers to do what they’ve never done before: take the lead in R&D.

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3D printing spare parts for our bodies

Face models made through 3D printing (S zillayali/Wikimedia Commons)

Thorsten Schlaeger, PhD, heads the Human Embryonic Stem Cell Core of the Boston Children’s Hospital Stem Cell Program.

I recently took my 6-year-old son to a Family Science Day, hosted by the 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting in Boston. He was most excited by a model airplane made out of parts that had been generated with a 3D printer. The scientist, from MIT, explained to us how this technology works: Instead of generating 2D printouts by spraying ink onto paper, 3D printing technologies assemble 3D objects layer by layer from a digital model, generally using molten plastics or metals.

3D printing is quickly being adopted by many professions, from architects and jewelers who want to build mock-ups for clients, to manufacturers of products like bikes, cars or airplanes. Soon we might all have 3D printers in our homes: The kids could design and print their own toys, while the grownups might use the technology to generate replacement parts for minor home improvement jobs (our broken shower faucet knob comes to mind).

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