Stories about: Abraham Rudolph

Abraham Rudolph, MD: The path of a pediatric cardiology pioneer

Abraham Rudolph MD
Rudolph (left) at Boston Children’s Hospital with Cardiologist-in-Chief Alexander Nadas, MD, c. 1958.

Abraham Rudolph, MD, who recently turned 93, has watched his chosen corner of the medical profession — pediatric cardiology — grow from rudimentary beginnings into a robust, multivariate discipline. Yet while his name is known worldwide in pediatric cardiology circles, he entered cardiology more than 50 years ago only by happenstance.

Born in South Africa in 1924, Rudolph came to the United States in 1951 to train in cardiology by invitation of Charles Janeway, MD, then Physician-in-Chief at Boston Children’s Hospital. Concerned about providing for his wife and newborn daughter, he chose cardiology over hematology or neurology because it offered a salary; many other physician-training opportunities at the time were unpaid. That first year, as the hospital’s first cardiology fellow, he made $3,000 — thanks to a family donation.

He stayed on for nine years, becoming director of the cardiac catheterization laboratory. There he found his focus.

“I became more and more interested in the physiology of the circulation, particularly the problems surrounding infancy,” he said in a 1996 interview with the American Academy of Pediatrics. “At that time, there were relatively few places that were doing anything about infants with heart disease. Most of the emphasis was on older children.”

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