Stories about: acid suppression

Study sounds another warning about proton pump inhibitors

child crying while feeding oropharyngeal dysphagia
Toddlers with oropharyngeal dysphagia who were treated with a PPI had a nearly doubled hospitalization rate. (IMAGE: ADOBE STOCK)

A new study adds to growing concerns about a class of drugs frequently prescribed to suppress stomach acid in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Previous research has linked the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) to an increased risk of various pulmonary and gastrointestinal infections in both adults and children. Patients treated with PPIs are also at higher risk for upper respiratory infections, pneumonia and sepsis.

A new study, published last week in JAMA Otolaryngologysuggests that use of PPIs may also raise the risk of hospitalization of infants and children with oropharyngeal dysphagia, a common swallowing disorder. The study was led by Rachel Rosen, MD, MPH and Daniel Duncan, MD at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Aerodigestive Center.

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Respiratory illness in children with gastroesophageal reflux: Are acid blockers part of the problem?

Lungs stomach-cropped-Shutterstock-flatcat
(Flatcat via Shutterstock)

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), in which stomach acids back up into the esophagus, is increasingly diagnosed in children. One study based on insurance-claims data found that GERD diagnoses in infants more than tripled between 2000 and 2005 (from 3.4 to 12.3 percent). In addition to heartburn and chest pain, GERD has been implicated in cough, wheezing and pneumonia.

To reduce such acid-related symptoms, doctors increasingly prescribe acid suppression medications such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). They’re among the most-prescribed drug classes in the U.S. But clinicians in the Aerodigestive Program at Boston Children’s Hospital noticed that a large number of their GERD patients had lung cultures positive for bacteria, and that a strong predictor was the amount of non-acid reflux the child had.

“We then had to ask the question, ‘are acid suppression medications, which are being prescribed to treat respiratory symptoms, actually worsening the problem?’” says program director Rachel Rosen, MD, MPH. “What are these medications doing to change the bacteria composition in children?”

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