Stories about: adolescents

It’s not just how long teens sleep, but when, that’s important to self-regulation

teen sleep

Chronic insufficient sleep is at epidemic levels in U.S. teens. It’s been associated with depression, substance use, accidents and academic failure. But according to a survey of some 2,000 7th to 12th graders in Fairfax County, VA, the number of hours of sleep isn’t the core problem. It’s being a “night owl” — unable to fall asleep until late at night.

Forced to get up early for school, night owls are in a state of chronic “jet lag” on school days. And that can lead to poor self-regulation, or an inability to alter thinking, emotions and behaviors to meet varying social demands, finds the study, published last week by Pediatrics.

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Delivering psychiatric care in the ED: Keeping adolescents in crisis out of limbo

Suicidal teens who come to the emergency room for help are often kept there until an inpatient bed becomes available, which can take hours or days. Elizabeth Wharff is changing the standard of care by providing family-based psychiatric treatment right in the ED.

When teenagers come to an emergency department expressing suicidal thoughts or after a suicide attempt, the accepted model of care is to evaluate, then either send them home or keep them in the ED until an inpatient psychiatric bed becomes available.

The wait for an inpatient bed can take hours, even days. No psychiatric treatment is given. The child is simply “boarded” – kept waiting in the ED under supervision, a practice that can increase distress for the child and family, while taking ED beds out of circulation for other acutely ill patients.

“Generally speaking, there is no history of providing psychiatric treatment in the emergency room setting,” says Elizabeth Wharff, director of the Emergency Psychiatry Service at Children’s Hospital Boston. “Since the late 1990s, we have seen a significant increase in the number of cases where an adolescent comes to our emergency room with suicidality and needs inpatient care, but there are no available psychiatric beds anywhere in the area.”

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Frances Jensen at TEDMED: “No more hand-me-down drugs”

Image by Steve Case via TwitPic: http://twitpic.com/31dosf

Before Children’s Hospital Boston’s own Frances Jensen, Director of Epilepsy Research, took the stage yesterday, Richard Saul Wurman, organizer of TEDMED and the TED conferences, spoke warmly of Children’s participation and sponsorship of this year’s event. A generous gift from the Hassenfeld Family Initiatives enabled that participation, and Wurman thanked the Hassenfelds and Children’s for bringing “such interesting people” to TEDMED 2010. With that, Jensen began her talk about the importance of understanding the developing brain.

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