Stories about: ALL

Landmark moment for science as the FDA approves a gene therapy for the first time

Leukemia blast cells, which could now be destroyed using a first-of-its-kind, FDA-approved gene therapy called CAR-T cell therapy
Leukemia blast cells.

Today, the Food and Drug Administration approved a gene therapy known as CAR T-cell therapy that genetically modifies a patient’s own cells to help them combat pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood cancer. It is the first gene therapy to be approved by the FDA.

“This represents the progression of the field of gene therapy, which has been developing over the last 30 years,” says gene therapy pioneer David A. Williams, MD, who is chief scientific officer of Boston Children’s Hospital and president of the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. “It’s a realization of what we envisioned to be molecular medicine when this research started. The vision — that we could alter cells in a way to cure disease — is now coming true.”

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When is an antipsychotic not an antipsychotic? When it’s an antileukemic

A zebrafish model of leukemia has helped find that an antipsychotic drug has anticancer properties.One of the hot trends in drug discovery could be called drug re-discovery: finding new uses for drugs that have already received FDA approval for a different indication.

It’s an approach that allows researchers and clinicians to rapidly test potential treatments for rare or difficult-to-treat conditions. Because the drug’s safety profile is already known, much of the preclinical and early clinical work that goes into developing a drug can be bypassed.

It was this kind of strategy that Alejandro Gutierrez, MD, and A. Thomas Look, MD, of Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, and Jon Aster, MD, PhD, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, had in mind when they started screening a library of nearly 5,000 FDA-approved compounds, off-patent drugs and natural products using a zebrafish model of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).

And with that strategy, they may have struck gold. Just not in the way they had expected.

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