Stories about: allergies

Looking beyond allergies: Does IgE keep a wary eye out for cancer?

watchdog IgE allergies cancer

Allergies of all kinds—to food, pollen, pets, etc.—can be blamed on a kind of antibody called IgE. Cousins of the more common IgG, IgE antibodies work with immune cells called mast cells to trigger the symptoms we associate with an allergic reaction (itchy skin, runny nose, closing throat, etc.).

Edda Fiebiger, PhD, has been studying IgE and allergies for years, and has noticed a curious association in several epidemiologic studies: people with high levels of IgE in their blood (as in people with allergies) have a lower risk of certain cancers. This—and the discovery of human IgE antibodies that bind to tumor antigens—suggests that IgE may help protect the body from cancer, and has given rise to a whole new field dubbed AllergoOncology.

But how does it work? In a recent paper in Cell Reports, Fiebiger and her colleagues reveal a pathway by which IgE may keep watch for tumor cells, one that’s totally separate from its allergic role.

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