Stories about: anemia

Naturally-occurring molecule in tree leaves could treat anemia, other iron disorders

Hinoki cypress

“Without iron, life itself wouldn’t be feasible,” says Barry Paw, MD, PhD. “Iron transport is very important because of the role it plays in oxygen transport in blood, in key metabolic processes and in DNA replication.”

Although iron is crucial to many aspects of health, it needs the help of the body’s iron-transporting proteins. Which is why new findings reported in Science could impact a whole slew of iron disorders, ranging from iron-deficiency anemia to iron-overload liver disease. The team has discovered that a small molecule found naturally in Japanese cypress tree leaves, hinokitiol, can transport iron to overcome iron disorders in animals.

The multi-institutional research team is from the University of Illinois, Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Northeastern University. Paw, co-senior author on the new paper and a physician at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s, and members of his lab demonstrated that hinokitiol can successfully reverse iron deficiency and iron overload in zebrafish disease models.

“Amazingly, we observed in zebrafish that hinokitiol can bind and transport iron inside or out of cell membranes to where it is needed most,” says Paw.

This gives hinokitiol big therapeutic potential.

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Discovering a rare anemia in time to save an infant’s life

Illustration of the erythropoietin hormone. A newly-discovered genetic mutation, which switches one amino acid in EPO's structure, resulted in two cases of rare anemia.
An illustration showing the structure of a cell-signaling cytokine called erythropoietin (EPO). It has long been thought that when EPO binds with its receptor, EPOR, it functions like an on/off switch, triggering red blood cell production. New findings suggest that this process is more nuanced than previously thought; even slight variations to cytokines like EPO can cause disease.

While researching a rare blood disorder called Diamond-Blackfan anemia, scientists stumbled upon an even rarer anemia caused by a previously-unknown genetic mutation. During their investigation, the team of scientists — from the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT and Yale University — had the relatively unusual opportunity to develop an “on-the-fly” therapy.

As they analyzed the genes of one boy who had died from the newly-discovered blood disorder, the team’s findings allowed them to help save the life of his infant sister, who was also born with the same genetic mutation. The results were recently reported in Cell.

“We had a unique opportunity here to do research, and turn it back to a patient right away,” says Vijay Sankaran, MD, PhD, the paper’s co-corresponding author and a principal investigator at the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. “It’s incredibly rewarding to be able to bring research full circle to impact a patient’s life.”

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Customized cell therapy for untreatable diseases: Your tax dollars at work

Leonard Zon (top) and Massachusetts Lt. Governor Timothy Murray in the Stem Cell Program's zebrafish facility. (Courtesy MLSC)
Ed. Note: Leonard Zon, MD, is founder and director of the Boston Children’s Hospital Stem Cell Program, which yesterday was awarded $4 million by the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center to build the Children’s Center for Cell Therapy.

As a hematologist, I see all too many children battling blood disorders that are essentially untreatable. Babies with immune deficiencies living life in a virtual bubble, hospitalized again and again for infections their bodies can’t fight. Children disabled by strokes caused by sickle cell disease, or suffering through sickle cell crises that drug treatments can’t completely prevent. Children whose only recourse is to risk a bone marrow transplant—if a suitably matched donor can even be found.

Over the past 20 years, my lab and that of George Daley, MD, PhD, at Boston Children’s Hospital have worked hard to give these children a one-time, potentially curative option—a treatment that begins with patients’ own cells and doesn’t require finding a match.

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Getting iron out after putting blood in: Transfusions and iron overload

Frequent transfusions can leave the body overloaded with iron. Ellis Neufeld is helping find new ways of scrubbing that extra iron from the blood. (Research Indicates/Flickr)

In some children the body’s machinery for making red blood cells just doesn’t work right. Conditions like Diamond Blackfan anemia or thalassemia can leave the body anemic, struggling to keep up with its own demands for oxygen. And the misshapen red blood cells of sickle cell disease can get stuck in small blood vessels and cause anemia, organ damage and great pain.

Right now, the most effective way to care for these blood disorders is with blood transfusions. But unlike trauma or surgery, a single transfusion doesn’t solve the problem for people with life-long anemias or sickle cell. Most people with thalassemia, for example, have transfusions every month for their entire life.

“After about 20 transfusions, you reach a point where the body is overloaded with iron from all of the extra hemoglobin that’s been introduced into it,” says Ellis Neufeld, MD, PhD, director of the Thalassemia Program at Dana-Farber/Children’s Hospital Cancer Center (a partnership of Boston Children’s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute). “The body has no way to actively remove iron on its own, so the iron starts to build up.” Over time, this can damage the liver, heart, pancreas and other major organs.

Over the last 40 years, a lot of work at DF/CHCC and elsewhere has gone into what’s called chelation therapy: drug-based treatments that scrub the blood of excess iron. Right now there are three chelating drugs in broad use: deferoxamine, deferasirox and deferiprone. They work well for many patients, but have their disadvantages.

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Avoiding the needle: Engineering blood vessels to secrete drugs

Within days of injecting a cell mix into mice, numerous blood vessels form. Can these vessels be made to secrete drugs, without the need for IVs or injections?

People who rely on protein-based drugs often have to endure IV hookups or frequent injections, sometimes several times a week. And protein drugs – like Factor VIII and Factor IX for patients with hemophilia, alpha interferon for hepatitis C, interferon beta for multiple sclerosis — are very expensive.

What if they could be made by people’s own bodies?

Combining tissue engineering with gene therapy, researchers at Children’s Hospital Boston showed that it’s possible to get blood vessels, made from genetically engineered cells, to secrete drugs on demand directly into the bloodstream. They proved the concept recently in the journal Blood, reversing anemia in mice with engineered vessels secreting erythropoietin (EPO).

This technology could potentially deliver other protein drugs,

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