Stories about: Angelman syndrome

New opportunities for Angelman

Chromosome 15. Image: Wikimedia Commons

Angelman syndrome (AS) is a rare, neurogenetic condition characterized by severe developmental delay, movement disorder, speech impairment (often with a complete lack of speech) and an unusually happy demeanor. Nearly every individual with AS faces at least two major challenges in their daily life: cognitive or intellectual disability, and movement disorder, usually in the form of ataxic (uncoordinated) gait, unsteadiness, jerky movements or tremors. Seizures are also common, and present a daunting health challenge.

Arising in one out of every 10,000 to 20,000 children from the loss of an enzyme on chromosome 15 called Ube3A, AS falls in the category of orphan diseases: ones that affect fewer than one in 200,000 Americans.  There is no cure for AS, but there are therapies and medications that can help the symptoms. Seizures can be controlled with the right medications, physical therapy can improve ataxia, and speech therapy helps improve communication skills.

Like nearly all orphan diseases, research on AS has historically not been well-funded, but orphan diseases have lately gained growing attention, especially at Children’s Hospital Boston.

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Neurogenetic disorders: Dreaming the impossible dream

People with autism and most other disorders of brain development have never had medications to treat their core behavioral and cognitive symptoms. The best they can get are drugs targeting secondary problems, like irritability or aggression. But now, a new wave of clinical trials, such as the one we posted about yesterday for Rett syndrome, aims to change this.

In the last decade, scientists have discovered many of the molecular pathways in genetic disorders that can impair cognition and place a child on the autism spectrum—such as tuberous sclerosis complex, Rett syndrome, Fragile X syndrome and Angelman syndrome. These discoveries are suggesting targets for drug treatment, and is changing how these conditions—and perhaps neurodevelopmental disorders generally—are viewed.

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