Stories about: antibiotic resistance

Microbial murder mystery solved

Bacteria, pictured in Petri dish culture here, can become resistant to antibiotics - but not killer cells. Why? New research from Boston Children's Hospital helps solve this microbial murder mystery.Immune cells called “killer cells” target bacteria invading the body’s cells, but how do they do this so effectively? Bacteria can quickly evolve resistance against antibiotics, yet it seems they have not so readily been able to evade killer cells. This has caused researchers to become interested in finding out the exact mechanism that killer cells use to destroy bacterial invaders.

Although one way that killer cells can trigger bacterial death is by inflicting oxidative damage, it has not yet been at all understood how killer cells destroy bacteria in environments without oxygen.

Now, for the first time, researchers have caught killer cells red-handed in the act of microbial murder

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Entry door for deadly C. difficile toxin suggests new mode of protection

Clostridium difficile
C. difficile (Wikimedia Commons)

Clostridium difficile, also called “C. diff,” tops the CDC’s list of urgent drug-resistant threats. Marked by severe diarrhea and intestinal inflammation, C. diff has become a leading cause of death from gastrointestinal illness, causing half a million infections a year in the U.S. alone.

C. diff flourishes best in hospitals and long-term care facilities where people are on long-term antibiotic treatment. “Antibiotics clear out the normal intestinal bacteria and create a space for C. diff to colonize and grow in the colon,” says Min Dong, PhD, who researches bacterial toxins in the Department of Urology at Boston Children’s Hospital.

In today’s Nature, Dong and postdoctoral fellow Liang Tao, PhD, together with researchers at University of Massachusetts Medical School, reveal how C. diff’s most potent toxin gets into cells. The toxin’s entryway, a receptor called Frizzled, provides an important and interesting clue to fighting the hard-to-eradicate infection.

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Mapping antibiotic resistance near you: ResistanceOpen

antibiotic resistance mapping ResistanceOpen

At the moment, it would appear the bacteria are winning. Antibiotic resistance is on the rise globally (in part because much of the public may not really understand how antibiotics work), threatening doctors’ ability to treat bacterial infections and potentially making surgery, chemotherapy and other medical procedures whose safety depends on antibiotic prophylaxis more risky.

Mapping antibiotic resistance — which bacteria are resistant to which drugs, and where — can help clinicians and public health officials decide how best to focus their control efforts. The challenge to date has been compiling resistance data in geographically useful ways.

“The data about antibiotic resistance are fragmented across laboratories and hospitals globally,” says Derek MacFadden, MD, a doctoral student at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health who is working with the HealthMap team in Boston Children’s Computational Health Informatics Program. “Most of the data that are available are very high level, so you can’t get an understanding of regional-level antibiotic resistance.”

This is where ResistanceOpen could come in handy. This new tool, launched by HealthMap team this week during the World Health Organization’s World Antibiotic Awareness Week, provides a window into regional and local antibiotic resistance patterns across the globe.

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CDC warns of ‘empty medicine cabinets’ as antibiotic resistance spreads

extended-spectrum B-lactamase

The discovery of penicillin in 1928 marked the beginning of the antibiotic era and dramatic improvements in health and medicine. With mass production of the new ‘wonder drug’ in the 1940s, threats from previously lethal diseases like bacterial infections and pneumonia waned. However, less than 100 years later, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is sounding alarms about the increasing threat of antibiotic resistance.

The United States is edging closer to the cliff of a post-antibiotic era in which medications lose their effectiveness, the CDC cautioned in a September report, detailing the burden and threat posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Every year, more than 2 million people in the U.S. contract antibiotic-resistant infections, and at least 23,000 people die as a result. Estimates vary, but data suggest that the direct health care costs of antibiotic resistance may top $20 billion annually.

The path from remedy to resistance is rapid. “Every time antibiotics are used in any setting, bacteria evolve by developing resistance. This process can happen with alarming speed,” says Steve Solomon, MD, director of CDC’s Office of Antimicrobial Resistance.

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