Stories about: apps

Fever, revisited: ResearchKit app will tap crowd-sourced temperature data

Feverprints temperature

What, exactly, is a fever?

It’s a surprisingly simple but important question in medicine. While a body temperature of 98.6°F (37°C) is generally considered “normal,” this number doesn’t account for temperature differences between individuals — and even within individuals at various times of the day. While a common sign of infection, fever can also occur with other medical conditions, including autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases.

“Many factors come together to set an individual’s ‘normal’ temperature, such as age, size, time of day and maybe even ancestry,” says Jared Hawkins, MMSc, PhD, the director of informatics for Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) and a member of the hospital’s Computational Health Informatics Program. “We want to help create a better understanding of the normal temperature variations throughout the day, to learn to use fever as a tool to improve medical diagnosis, and to evaluate the effect of fever medications on symptoms and disease course.”

That’s where Feverprints comes in

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Crisis Care: A unique suicide prevention app

 

More than 100,000 smartphone apps are currently categorized as “health apps.” There are apps for physical health—apps that log work-outs, track nutritional intake, and monitor sleeping patterns. And there are apps for mental health—apps that identify your mood, guide meditation and alleviate depression. But can an app tackle a public health problem as serious as teen suicide?

Turns out, mobile phones and suicide prevention may not be such strange bedfellows.

Elizabeth Wharff, PhD, and Kimberly O’Brien, PhD, clinician-researchers from the Department of Psychiatry at Boston Children’s Hospital, specialize in working with adolescents who struggle with suicidal thoughts. Noting that teens are already turning to their phones whenever they need something, they believe a mobile app may be the perfect platform to support them through tough times. Wharff feels that existing apps designed to help with depression and anxiety lack something crucial: parent mode.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Boston Children’s to host second annual Innovators’ Showcase

Ten or more monitors keep track of every child in the ICU. How can clinicians manage all the data they provide?  Surgical Sam beating heart pediatric trainer mannequin simulation Simulator Program The Chamberlain GroupA prototype of the warming pad. The white color indicates that the pad's "phase-change" material is in its solid state. (Courtesy of Anne Hansen)Silk worms could create tissues needed for urinary tract reconstruction.

 

(Clockwise from top: T3, Surgical Sam, non-electric baby warmer, silk-based organ reconstruction)

Next week—on April 15—Boston-area visitors can sample inventions and technologies from around Boston Children’s Hospital, some in development and some already in use. More than 20 medical innovations will be on display in an interactive “science fair” format. We’ll be demonstrating a variety of medical devices, mobile applications, software IT innovations, wearables and bioengineering innovations. It’s free and open to the public.

The event is hosted by Boston Children’s Innovation Acceleration Program and Technology & Innovation Development Office, from 2 to 4 p.m., followed by networking time (4 to 5 p.m.).

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Worried where the flu is? There’s an app for that

Photo: @alviseni/Flickr

Before you know it, flu season – that miserable time of sneezing, snuffling, coughing, and generally feeling blah – will be upon us again. And as with anything, the best way to deal with the flu is to be prepared for it.

But when, exactly, is the right time to start stocking up on tissues and looking for vaccination clinics? You could go with the conventional wisdom: Get the annual flu vaccine in the fall and spend the next five months avoiding anyone with bleary eyes and a runny nose.

Or, to try to get a more targeted read on when the flu will appear in your town, you could turn to the power of the web. In 2008 – a few months before H1N1 influenza appeared on the scene – Google launched Google Flu Trends, which mined user search data to gauge flu activity on a national, state, and even (in some cases) city level.

The H1N1 outbreak proved to be a tipping point for online disease tracking tools. Recognizing this, the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is getting into the act with the CDC Flu App Challenge. A contest run through Challenge.gov, the Flu App Challenge encourages developers to come up with “an innovative use of technology to raise awareness of influenza and/or educate consumers on ways to prevent and treat the flu.” Submitted apps – for the web, for desktop computers, for mobile devices – use publicly available data feeds, including at least one maintained by the CDC, to promote healthy behavior for flu prevention. All of the submitted apps are eligible for several awards, including a People’s Choice Award chosen by public vote.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment