Stories about: assistive technology

Why can’t a walker be more like an all-terrain vehicle?

Child innovator Sadie with Amazing Curb Climber
Photo: Patrick McCallum

Sadie McCallum’s own life led her to become an inventor. She’s 9, has cerebral palsy, for which she’s seen at Boston Children’s Hospital, and relies on a walker to get around. “It would be SO much easier if my walker was more like an all-terrain vehicle and could go over curbs or stairs,” she says.

This year, in third grade, Sadie took part in her school’s annual Invention Convention and designed and built the Amazing Curb Climber. She sketched the design, and her family helped her with the planning, drilling, sawing and assembly. The end product combined two of Sadie’s old walkers and six lawn mower wheels (three on either side) to create an all-terrain design, plus two smaller wheels in back. Her dad helped build a portable curb for testing and demo purposes.

The invention won first place for Best Use of a Wheel and second place for Kids’ Choice. Sadie went on to the regional Invention Convention, where she took the first place for the Special Needs Award as well as the Microsoft Technology Award.

Read Sadie’s post on our sister blog, Thriving.

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Licensing: It’s not just the money

(Photo: iChaz/Flickr)

An article popped up in my Google alerts that gave me some excitement.  A survey from the Association of University Technology Managers, reported in Mass High Tech, placed Children’s Hospital Boston fifth in licensing income among all U.S. hospitals. We were ranked just below the Mayo Clinic, which has more than double the research funding of Children’s. Massachusetts General Hospital was second on the list and Brigham and Women’s was eighth.*

I don’t often get to see quick financial results from my work (I’m the marketing and communications specialist in Children’s Technology and Innovation Development Office (TIDO), which licenses the Hospital’s technologies). But what I do get to see regularly is just as important to our mission: small advances that barely impact the hospital’s bottom line but have a large significance to our patients.

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Kids with cerebral palsy test the latest touchscreen technology

Last month, pediatric specialists from across town visited Children’s Hospital Boston for demos of a technology designed to motivate children with cerebral palsy (CP) to do their occupational therapy. Created by a multidisciplinary team from Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital (SRH) and the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), the system uses a three-foot wide tabletop touchscreen donated by Microsoft Surface–imagine a giant iPad.

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Could clothing teach babies with brain injury how to move?

 

 

The seemingly random flailing of a newborn’s arms and legs is more important than it looks – it’s how babies begin to explore the physical world and their place in it. This motion-capture movie shows the normal kicking of a 5-month-old, but when a baby’s muscles are weakened by brain injury, this exploration is curtailed. It becomes a vicious cycle: the motor parts of the brain can’t develop properly, impairing mobility even further. Psychologist Eugene Goldfield, PhD, of the Center for Behavioral Science at Children’s Hospital Boston, with a team of engineers and scientists at the Wyss Institute, is in the early stages of a project that could help break this cycle for babies with cerebral palsy.

Goldfield calls it the “second skin” – smart clothing whose fabric, studded with tiny sensors, would pick up attempts at motion.

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Networking: the mother of invention

Infant kicking data being captured for the "second skin"

Two or three years ago, seeing all the children in wheelchairs coming to Children’s Hospital, I asked myself whether I might be able to contribute something tangible to help restore their mobility. A psychologist by training, I had published some academic articles on how young children become independently mobile. But I’ve also always liked to build things.

It became clear that anything I wanted to build would require skills I didn’t have. I envisioned a form-fitting, electronic garment that a child with a brain injury could wear to assist his or her biological muscles, teaching the brain how the body should move. How on earth could I get the money to build such a garment, and who could help me?

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