Stories about: asthma

News Note: Steroids could be counter-productive in severe asthma

severe asthma
Nine years old kid with allergic asthma, inhaling his medication through spacer while looking at with his wide opened eyes perhaps he is getting energy boost

Some 10 to 15 percent of people with asthma have severe disease that medications can’t control. A deep-dive multicenter study finds differences in these patients’ immune systems that may explain why increased dosages of corticosteroids don’t help — and could lead to steroids doing more harm than good. Findings appear online this week in Science Immunology.

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Acetaminophen does not aggravate young children’s asthma

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A head-to-head comparison with ibuprofen refutes a link between acetaminophen and asthma exacerbations.

Your toddler is screaming in pain. Her forehead is burning. You rush to your local drugstore. What do you get — Tylenol or Motrin? And by the way, she also has asthma.

Recently, many parents have been under the impression that acetaminophen (Tylenol, etc.) may do more harm than good in young children with asthma.

“There’s been a lot of ‘smoke’ about this, based on a lot of retrospective observational data,” says Wanda Phipatanakul, MD, MS, of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Division of Allergy and Immunology.

The studies in question concluded that the common over-the-counter remedy can cause asthma exacerbations. Reviewing these studies, one author concluded, “Until future studies document the safety of this drug, children with asthma or at risk for asthma should avoid the use of acetaminophen.”

The Acetaminophen Versus Ibuprofen in Children with Asthma (AVICA) trial, led by Phipatanakul for the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s AsthmaNet now sets the record straight.

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Can asthma be nipped in the bud?

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A multicenter randomized trial is testing omalizumab (Xolair) in wheezy toddlers. (FDA/Wikimedia Commons)

Worldwide, asthma affects an estimated 300 million people, and is expected to surpass 400 million by 2025, according to the World Health Organization. About 1 in 10 U.S. children have asthma, and research shows that the vast majority of them also have allergy. Could that provide a clue to its prevention?

Starting at 2 to 3 years of age, susceptible children start to become sensitized to pollens, mold spores and other airborne allergens. They begin to produce IgE antibodies, which not only trigger allergic reactions but also impair their anti-viral immune responses — potentially leading to more viral infections that can further hasten their progression to asthma.

A multicenter clinical trial, led by Wanda Phipatanakul, MD, MS, of the Division of Allergy & Immunology at Boston Children’s Hospital, now aims to test whether the anti-IgE drug omalizumab (Xolair) can short-circuit this process.

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TriVox Health: improving care through shared online tracking

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Since we spoke with the founders of TriVox Health in 2014, their disease management program has taken off. The program began in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Division of Developmental Medicine as a way to more efficiently collect information on children’s ADHD symptoms from parents and teachers. It is now a user-friendly, web-based platform for tracking multiple conditions, incorporating medication confirmation, side effects reporting, disease symptom surveys and quality of life measures.

Vector sat down with founders Eric Fleegler, MD, MPH and Eugenia Chan, MD, MPH to learn about TriVox Health’s rapid growth over the past year, and what their plans are for the future.

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Breaking the allergic asthma cycle…by targeting nerve endings

asthma therapeuticsExisting asthma medications work by suppressing inflammatory signaling by immune cells or by dilating constricted airways. Over time, though, these drugs’ benefits can wane. New research supports a surprising new tactic for controlling asthma: targeting sensory nerve endings in the lungs with a selective drug.

Our lungs are known to contain specialized sensory neurons known as nociceptors that connect to the brainstem. Best known for causing the perception of pain, nocieptors also trigger the cough reflex in the lungs when they detect potential harms like dust particles, chemical irritants or allergens. Nociceptor nerve endings are known to be more plentiful and more readily activated in people with asthma. Now it’s also clear that they help drive allergic inflammation.

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Health claims data: Taking a 30,000-foot view on disease associations

Stethoscope and keyboard health insurance claims dataThe only time most of us ever look at an insurance claim is after a hospital or doctor visit, when we get a claim summary from our carrier. And then as far as we know, it gets filed away, never again to see the light of day.

But there’s a lot to be learned from these claims data.

As with electronic medical records (EMRs), behind every claim an insurer receives is a detailed record about symptoms, tests, diagnosis and treatment. Properly compiled and analyzed, claims data can be an excellent resource for taking population-level snapshots of disease, helping to identify trends and reveal or probe associations.

That’s why claims data recently caught the eye of Kenneth Mandl, MD, MPH, and Mei-Sing Ong, PhD, two researchers in Boston Children’s Informatics Program (CHIP). Using claims records for roughly 2.5 million Americans, they turned their attention to two conditions—epilepsy and asthma—with interesting results.

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Reversing lung disease in mice by coaxing production of healthy cells

Using a novel 3-D culture method, scientists were able to prod lung (bronchioalveolar) stem cells to produce colonies containing the cell type of choice: airway (bronchiolar) epithelial cells, alveolar epithelial cells or both. (Images: Joo-Hyeon Lee)
Using a novel 3-D culture method, scientists were able to prod lung (bronchioalveolar) stem cells to produce colonies with the cell type of choice: airway (bronchiolar) epithelial cells, alveolar epithelial cells or both. (Images: Joo-Hyeon Lee)

Someday it may be possible to treat lung diseases like emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis or asthma by prodding the lungs to produce healthy versions of the cells that are damaged.

That’s the hope of researchers Carla Kim, PhD, and Joo-Hyeon Lee, PhD, of the Stem Cell Research Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. In the Jan. 30 issue of Cell, they describe a pathway in the lungs, activated by injury, that directs stem cells to transform into specific kinds of cells—and that can be manipulated to enhance different kinds of repair, at least in a mouse model.

By boosting the pathway, Kim, Lee and colleagues successfully increased production of alveolar epithelial cells, which line the lung’s alveoli—the tiny sacs where gas exchange takes place, and that are irreversibly damaged in diseases like pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema.

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The obesity-asthma connection: A link in the innate immune system?

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Obesity may set off innate immune factors that inflame the lungs.

Both asthma and obesity have surged in recent decades, and a growing body of literature is linking the two conditions. Various explanations have been proposed: One recent study suggests that hormonal factors in obesity may regulate airway diameter; another suggests that obesity activates asthma-related genes.

“Why obesity predisposes a person to asthma has been a real puzzle,” says Dale Umetsu, MD, PhD, who recently researched the problem with Hye Young Kim, PhD, and other colleagues in the Division of Allergy and Immunology at Boston Children’s Hospital. “Our goal was to find the connection between these two problems, which occur in both children and adults, and to explore possible new treatments.”

The team’s research indicates that obesity alters the innate immune system—the body’s first responder to infection—in several ways, resulting in lung inflammation. Published earlier this month in Nature Medicine, their work also suggests a completely new, “druggable” approach to treating patients with obesity-associated asthma, for whom standard asthma drugs often work poorly.

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From flu to fungi: Different asthmas, different pathways

Understanding asthma's different pathways may allow individualized treatments.
Understanding asthma’s different pathways may allow individualized treatments.

Existing asthma drugs don’t work well in many people, and a major reason is becoming clear: Asthma isn’t just one disease, but a collection of diseases that cause airways to constrict and become twitchy. Different types of asthma have different triggers that exacerbate the disease, each setting off a different part of the immune system, and each needing a different pharmacologic approach.

In this week’s Nature Medicine, a team led by Dale Umetsu, MD, PhD, and Lee Albacker, PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Division of Immunology and Harvard Medical School, describe a type of asthma triggered by the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, a common mold.

Existing asthma control drugs, like inhaled corticosteroids, target allergic asthma, via pathways involving adaptive immunity and a group of T cells, known as Th2 cells. However, the new work, in live mice and in human cell cultures, suggests that Aspergillus triggers asthma through a faster process involving the innate immune system. In both mice and humans, Aspergillus activates a different set of T cells, known as natural killer T cells (NKT cells).

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Consistency and cost: Why reducing variability in health care matters

Many doctors still chafe at practicing "cookbook medicine." (Tim Sackton/Flickr)
The argument that 'I do not practice cookbook medicine' still resonates with many practitioners. (Tim Sackton/Flickr)
Mark Neuman, MD, MPH, practices emergency medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital and is director of Fellow Research and Research Education. Vincent Chiang, MD, chief of Children’s Inpatient Services (CHIPS), contributed to this post, adapted from their recent commentary in Pediatrics.

It’s no secret that the U.S. health care system is in the midst of a financial crisis. As a nation, we spend nearly 18 percent of our Gross Domestic Product on health care, and health care costs remain the largest contributor to the national debt. In 2011 alone, the cost of maintaining the nation’s 5,700 hospitals exceeded $770 billion.

If ever there was a time for a societal mandate to reduce health care costs, that time is now.

It’s widely accepted that one of the first steps to reigning in runaway health care costs is reducing variability in the manner in which care is delivered. Well-defined and well-disseminated best practice guidelines can improve the reproducibility and standardization of care. In time, these guidelines may reduce costly and unnecessary tests and hospitalizations, while providing a platform on which to measure and enhance quality. More consistency may also allow providers to be more efficient with their time, space and personnel.

If it’s so costly, why is health care variability so abundant?

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