Stories about: autoimmune disease

Transfusing engineered red blood cells to protect against autoimmune disease

Red blood cells, pictured here, could be engineered to protect against autoimmune disease
Transfusions of engineered red blood cells could help prevent and/or treat autoimmune disease.

Autoimmune disease is usually treated using general immunosuppressants. But this non-targeted therapy leaves the body more susceptible to infection and other life-threatening diseases.

Now, scientists at Boston Children’s Hospital, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research think they may have found a targeted way to protect the body from autoimmune disease. Their approach, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, uses transfusions of engineered red blood cells to re-train the immune system. Early experiments in mice have already shown that the approach can prevent — and even reverse — clinical signs of two autoimmune diseases: a multiple-sclerosis (MS)-like condition and Type 1 diabetes.

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Deconstructed ‘death receptors’ suggest new ways to tackle cancer, autoimmune disease

death receptors apoptosis cancer autoimmune
The 3-D structure of the Fas death receptor’s transmembrane region, consisting of three tightly packed helices shown here from three angles. Cancer-causing mutations deform this structure, preventing “time to die” signals from passing through. (Fu Q; et al. Molecular Cell, Feb. 5, 2016).

Programmed cell death, or apoptosis, helps keep us healthy by ensuring that excess or potentially dangerous cells self-destruct. One way cells know it’s time to die is through signals received by so-called death receptors that stud cells’ surfaces. When these signals go awry, the result can be cancer (uncontrolled cell growth) or autoimmune disease (cells self-destructing too readily).

Researchers at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and the Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital deconstructed a death receptor called Fas to learn more about its workings, using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to reveal its structure.

They found that for immune cells to hear the “time to die” signal, a portion of Fas called the transmembrane region must coil into an intricate three-part formation, allowing the signal to pass into the cell. The NMR imaging also revealed that the amino acid proline is critical for the formation’s stability. Cancer-causing mutations in the transmembrane region (one of them affecting proline itself) deformed this delicate structure and prevented signals from passing through.

This better understanding of the Fas death receptor, published last week in Molecular Cell, could lead to new approaches that bypass Fas to encourage apoptosis in cancer or, conversely, inhibit Fas in autoimmune disease.

Read more on HMS’s news site.

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Silencing immune attacks in type 1 diabetes

Could diabetes be treated without insulin shots? (Tess Watson/Flickr)
Could diabetes be treated without insulin shots? (Tess Watson/Flickr)

For decades, patients have managed their type 1 diabetes by injecting themselves with insulin to regulate the glucose in their blood. While this form of medical management addresses the immediate danger of low insulin levels, long-term complications associated with diabetes, like heart and kidney diseases, still threaten more than 215,000 children currently living with the disease in the United States.

“Insulin injections can manage hyperglycemia by reducing the patient’s glucose levels, but it is not the cure,” says Paolo Fiorina, MD, PhD, of the Nephrology Division at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Fiorina is currently involved in new research targeting a molecular pathway that triggers diabetes in the first place—potentially providing a permanent cure. It could potentially change the face of diabetes treatment in children.

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