Stories about: autoimmune disorders

This autoimmune awareness month, meet Boston scientists who are pushing the envelope in autoimmune research

“Red” and “green” B cells emerge from the pack as best producers of the potent autoantibodies in a mouse model of the autoimmune disease known as lupus.
In a mouse model of lupus, colorized red and green B cells outdo their blue, yellow and aqua competitors. Each color represents a different B cell clone. The proliferation of red and green B cells demonstrates that these clones have emerged as the best producers of autoantibodies. Credit: Michael Carroll lab (Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School)

The basic biological mechanisms that underpin autoimmune disorders are finally coming to light. Researchers in Boston’s Longwood medical area — a neighborhood where the streets are flanked by hospitals, research institutions and academic centers — are setting the stage for a new wave of future therapies that can prevent, reduce or even reverse symptoms of disease.

Inside the lab of Michael Carroll, PhD, scientists are working to understand how and why immune cells start to attack the body’s own tissues; it turns out the immune system’s B cells compete with each other in true Darwinian fashion. On the way to this discovery, the lab has flushed out new potential drug targets that could ease autoimmune symptoms — or stop them entirely — by “resetting” the body’s tolerance to itself.

Carroll’s team has also drawn some of the first links between chronic inflammation, synapse loss and neuropsychiatric disease in lupus.

The implications for a link between inflammation and synapse loss go beyond lupus because inflammation underpins so many diseases and conditions, ranging from Alzheimer’s to viral infection and even to to chronic stress. In which case, are we all losing synapses to some varying degree? Carroll plans to find out.

Meanwhile, Sun Hur, PhD, and members of her lab are digging deep on a genetic variant and its link to pediatric inflammatory autoimmune disorders like Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome.

“We’ve found that chronic inflammation and autoinflammatory disorders can originate from genetic mutations to MDA5 that cause it to misrecognize ‘self’ as ‘non-self,’ essentially launching the immune system into self-attack mode,” said Hur.

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