Stories about: bacterial infections

A new tactic for antibiotic-resistant pneumonia: Making neutrophils stronger, but fewer in number

bacterial pneumonia with neutrophils

Antibiotic resistance is a growing threat in bacterial pneumonia. While treatments that stimulate the immune system can help the body fight the invaders, these treatments can also cause inflammation that damages and weakens lung tissue.

Now, research in Science Translational Medicine suggests a way to have the best of both worlds: enhanced bacterial killing with reduced inflammation.

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Infecting bacteria show surprising genetic diversity; we may need to adapt too

New research may change the way we culture and treat infections. (Burkholderia cepacia complex, CDC/Wikimedia Commons)
New research may change the way we culture and treat infections. (Burkholderia cepacia complex, CDC/Wikimedia Commons)

Ed. note: A longer version of this story appeared on Harvard Medical School’s website.

A boy with cystic fibrosis develops a potentially deadly Burkholderia dolosa infection in his lungs. Various genetic mutations allow some bacterial strains to survive assaults from his immune system and antibiotics, while others perish. Eventually, the strongest mutant dominates the B. dolosa colony.

Right? Maybe not, say the authors of a new study. Examining sputum samples from infected patients, they found that dozens of different kinds of B. dolosa may coexist in that boy’s lungs—each adapting and surviving in different ways. The findings, published last month in Nature Genetics, warn of possible shortfalls in the way infections are currently cultured and treated.

“We found that when a pathogen like B. dolosa infects us, it diversifies. Many cells discover ways to survive, and these successful mutants coexist,” says senior author Roy Kishony, PhD, professor of systems biology at Harvard Medical School.

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