Stories about: bone marrow

Delivered through amniotic fluid, stem cells could treat a range of birth defects

Transamniotic stem cell therapy, or TRASCET, is like amniocentesis is reverse.
Amniotic fluid is routinely withdrawn for prenatal testing. It could also be a delivery route for fetal cell therapy to treat congenital anomalies, with broader applications than once thought.

The amniotic fluid surrounding babies in the womb contains fetal mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that can differentiate into many cell types and tissues. More than a decade ago, Dario Fauza, MD, PhD, a surgeon and researcher at Boston Children’s Hospital, proposed using these cells therapeutically. His lab has been exploring these cells’ healing properties ever since.

Replicated in great quantity in the lab and then reinfused into the amniotic fluid in animal models — a reverse amniocentesis if you will — MSCs derived from amniotic fluid have been shown to repair or mitigate congenital defects before birth. In spina bifida, they have induced skin to grow over the exposed spinal cord; in gastroschisis, they have reduced damage to the exposed bowel. Fauza calls this approach Trans-Amniotic Stem Cell Therapy, or TRASCET.

New research findings, reported this month in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery, could expand TRASCET’s therapeutic potential.

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