Stories about: cancer treatment

Probing the mystery of drug resistance: New hope for leukemia’s toughest cases

Alejandro Gutierrez, MD, was inspired by the deaths of three patients to figure out how leukemia cells become resistant to drugs.
Alejandro Gutierrez, MD
(PHOTO: MICHAEL GODERRE / BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL)

Three children Alejandro Gutierrez, MD, treated for leukemia during his fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital still haunt him more than a decade later. One 15-year-old boy died from the toxicity of the drugs he was given; the other two patients went through the whole treatment only to die when their leukemia came back. “That really prompted a deep frustration with the status quo,” Gutierrez recalls. “It’s motivated everything I’ve done in the lab since then.”

Gutierrez, now a researcher in the Division of Hematology/Oncology, has made it his mission to figure out why leukemia treatments cure some patients but not others. And in today’s issue of Cancer Cell, he and 15 colleagues report progress on two important fronts: They shed light on how leukemia cells become resistant to drugs, and they describe how two drugs used in combination may overcome that resistance, offering new hope to thousands of children and adults with leukemia.

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The softer the nanoparticle, the better the drug delivery to tumors

Nanolipogels, pictured here, are a promising drug delivery system
Nanolipogels of different stiffness, as seen through a transmission electron microscope. Credit: Moses lab/Boston Children’s Hospital.

For the first time, scientists have shown that the elasticity of nanoparticles can affect how cells take them up in ways that can significantly improve drug delivery to tumors.

A team of Boston Children’s Hospital researchers led by Marsha A. Moses, PhD, who directs the Vascular Biology Program, created a novel nanolipogel-based drug delivery system that allowed the team to investigate the exclusive role of nanoparticle elasticity on the mechanisms of cell entry.

Their findings — that softer nanolipogels more efficiently enter cells using a different internalization pathway than their stiffer counterparts — were recently published in Nature Communications.

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Cancer treatment and fertility: Acting now to have children later

While many childhood cancers are readily curable, those cures can come at a cost to future fertility. Sara Barton and Richard Yu want to help lower that cost. (Wikimedia Commons)

With over 75 percent of children diagnosed with cancer surviving into adulthood, more and more parents ask questions about the quality of life survivors can expect in the future, including: Will my child be able to have children down the road?

They’re right to be concerned. The therapies that are so effective at saving children’s lives can themselves cause a host of problems that don’t manifest until years later. These late effects of cancer treatment include particularly harsh impacts on fertility.

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