Stories about: cardiac intensive care

Personalized care model enhances preterm babies’ development

NICU baby with his mother
Christian, born at 26 weeks gestation, has lived in the NICU since May. (Photos: Katherine C. Cohen, unless otherwise noted)

November 17, 2017 is World Prematurity Day.

From a cozy, dark and quiet existence, a preterm baby is forced out into a harsh, bright and noisy environment. Instead of being comforted and held securely by their parents, preemies are poked and prodded, hooked up to machines and exposed to jarring sights and smells as their developing brains struggle to realign.

Each year, an estimated 15 million babies around the world — 1 in 10 — are born prematurely. Medical advances enable more of them to live, but often with medical and developmental problems.

Heidelise Als, PhD, director of Neurobehavioral Infant and Child Studies at Boston Children’s Hospital, has worked for more than 30 years to create better outcomes, developing the Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program, or NIDCAP.

The NIDCAP model of care seeks to support the development of fragile newborns and reduce their stress. In a series of studies, Als and colleagues at other hospitals have documented its successes: improvements in lung function, feeding and growth; shorter lengths of stay; a reduction in brain hemorrhage and improved brain function and structure, with brain effects lasting until at least 8 years of age. Benefits have been documented even in medically fragile, very preterm infants and infants with severe intrauterine growth restriction.

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Cardiac RESTORE: Decreasing medication dependency in the cardiac intensive care unit

child getting medicineChildren undergoing heart surgery need strong sedation and pain medications. Weaning them off these medications is complicated; many have withdrawal symptoms that require additional medications. Unfortunately, says Patricia Lincoln, RN, MS, CCRN, CNS-BC, “the medications we use to manage withdrawal may keep patients in the hospital longer.”

Last spring, Lincoln and her nursing colleagues in the Boston Children’s Hospital Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (CICU) launched an initiative called Cardiac RESTORE to help wean patients from pain and sedation medications according to a carefully designed algorithm.

“Cardiac RESTORE helps us continually assess what patients need and regulate their physiologic response to changes,” says Lincoln. “Medication doses are constantly being titrated or weaned unless the patient has an acute deterioration.”

Early results show decreased usage of pain and sedation medications with no ill effects.

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In the ICU, nurse experience and education can mean life or death

Morning rounds on the pediatric cardiac ICU.
Morning rounds on the pediatric cardiac intensive care unit.

Registered nurses (RNs) remain the largest group of health care providers and typically account for the greatest share of most U.S. hospitals’ operating budgets, about 60 percent. In adult hospitals, research has shown a consistently positive effect of increasing percentages of nurses with baccalaureate educations, and linked increased RN staffing and healthy work environments with improved patient outcomes.

However, this assessment has not been conducted in children’s hospitals—until now.

In a study in the Journal of Nursing Administration, nursing leaders from 38 free-standing children’s hospitals explored which nursing and organizational characteristics influence mortality for children undergoing congenital heart surgery.

The study, involving 20,407 pediatric patients and 3,413 pediatric critical care nurses, was led by Patricia Hickey, PhD, MBA, RN, from the Heart Center at Boston Children’s Hospital.

In pediatrics, congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect requiring surgical intervention for survival. Due to their critical care needs, these patients consume a disproportionate share of U.S. hospital resources.

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