Stories about: Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Program

Can we improve neuropsychiatric outcomes in children with congenital heart disease?

Jane Newburger studies neurodevelopment in children with congenital heart defects
Jane Newburger, MD, has dedicated her career to helping children with heart defects reach their full potential.

About 1 out of 100 babies are born with a congenital heart defects. Thanks to medical and surgical advances, these children usually survive into adulthood, but they are often left with developmental, behavioral or learning challenges.

Children with “single-ventricle” defects — in which one of the heart’s two pumping chambers is too small or weak to function properly — are especially at risk for neurodevelopmental problems. “Single-ventricle physiology creates cerebrovascular hemodynamics that can reduce oxygen delivery to the brain,” explains Jane Newburger, MD, MPH, director of the Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Program at Boston Children’s Hospital.

How does this play out in adolescence? In three recent studies, Boston Children’s Heart Center collaborated with the departments of Neurology and Psychiatry to track neurodevelopmental outcomes after corrective Fontan operations. They evaluated preteens and teens as old as 19 — the longest follow-up to date.

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