Stories about: Catherine Brownstein

Can rare pain syndromes point the way to new analgesics?

analgesic drug discovery could reduce prescription opioid use
Boston Children’s Hospital and Amgen will collaborate to discover and accelerate non-addicting pain drugs.

As the opioid epidemic deepens and drug overdoses increase, effective non-addicting painkillers are desperately needed. Efforts to discover new pain pathways to target with new drugs have thus far had little success. Other promising research is investigating triggerable local delivery systems for non-opioid nerve blockers, but it’s still in the early stages.

A new collaboration between Boston Children’s Hospital and the biopharmaceutical company Amgen is aimed at accelerating new pain treatments. Announced yesterday, it will revolve around patients with rare, perplexing pain syndromes. The scientists hope that the genetic variants they find in these patients will shed new light on pain biology and lead to new ways of controlling pain. 

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If I knew then what I know now: The need for infrastructure to enable precision medicine

precision medicine - closing the infrastructure loop
For precision medicine to happen, we need to be able to close the loop when genetic discoveries are made.

Catherine Brownstein, MPH, PhD, is scientific director of The Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research at Boston Children’s Hospital. Kelsey Graber, MSc, is a research assistant in the Developmental Neuropsychiatry Program. Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich, MD, is director of the Developmental Neuropsychiatry Program at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Research implicating rare genetic variants in medical and psychiatric diseases is quickly accumulating. This expanding knowledge should be taken into account when making treatment decisions for patients carrying these variants — as well as other family members — even when that knowledge comes after the patient is tested. But all too often, medical institutions are unable to go back and update the information given to families. We need a better infrastructure to enable precision medicine.

This problem recently surfaced in our psychiatry practice. It came to our attention because of a young boy with mild coordination delays and learning disabilities. At age 6, he started experiencing daily hallucinations such as voices telling him to kill his classmates.

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The genetics of early-onset psychosis: Could it aid understanding of schizophrenia?

psychosis schizophrenia
(Thomas Zapata/Wikimedia Commons)

At age six, Matthew (not his real name) began hearing voices coming out of the walls and the school intercom, telling him to hurt himself and others. He saw ghosts, aliens in trees and color footprints. Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich, MD, a psychiatrist at Boston Children’s Hospital, put Matthew, at age 9, on antipsychotic medications, and the hallucinations stopped.

It’s rare for children so young to have psychotic symptoms. Intrigued, Gonzalez-Heydrich referred Matthew for genetic testing.

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