Stories about: cell therapy

Helping tissue grafts build a blood supply: Less is more

blood vessels in vivo

For a tissue graft to survive in the body — whether it’s a surgical graft or bioengineered tissue — it needs to be nourished by blood vessels, and these vessels must connect with the recipient’s circulation. While scientists know how to generate blood vessels for engineered tissue, efforts to get them to connect with the recipient’s vessels have mostly failed.

“Surgeons will tell you that when putting tissue in a new location in the body, the small blood vessels don’t connect at the new site,” says Juan Melero-Martin, PhD, a researcher in Cardiac Surgery in Boston Children’s Hospital. “If you want to engineer a tissue replacement, you’d better understand how the vessels get connected, because if the vessels go, the graft goes.”

Melero-Martin and colleagues have uncovered several strategies to help these connections form, as they describe online today in Nature Biomedical Engineering. The strategies could help improve the success of such procedures as heart patching, bone grafting, fat transplants and islet transplantation.

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Gene therapy: The promise, the reality, the future

gene therapy
(Graphs courtesy Alexandra Biffi, Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center)

Gene therapy stalled in the early 2000s as adverse effects came to light in European trials (leukemias triggered by the gene delivery vector) and following the 1999 death of U.S. patient Jesse Gelsinger. But after 30 years of development, and with the advent of safer vectors, gene therapy is becoming a clinical reality. It falls into two main categories:

  • In vivo: Direct injection of the gene therapy vector, carrying the desired gene, into the bloodstream or target organ.
  • Ex vivo: Removal of a patient’s cells, treating the cells with gene therapy, and reinfusing them back into the patient, as in hematopoietic stem cell transplant and CAR T-cell therapy.

A recent panel at Boston Children’s Hospital, hosted by the hospital’s Technology and Innovation Development Office (TIDO), explored where gene therapy is and where it’s going. Here were the key takeaways:

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2017 predictions for biomedicine

2017 predictions for biomedicine

David Williams, MD, is Boston Children’s Hospital’s newly appointed Chief Scientific Officer. He is also president of the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and director of Clinical and Translational Research at Boston Children’s. Vector connected with him to get his forecast on where biomedical research and therapeutic development will go in the year ahead.

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Souped-up fish facility boosts drug discovery and testing

closeup of zebrafish-20150526_ZebraFishCeremony-60The care and feeding of more than 250,000 zebrafish just got better, thanks to a $4 million grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center to upgrade Boston Children’s Hospital’s Karp Aquatics Facility. Aside from the fish, patients with cancer, blood diseases and more stand to benefit.

From a new crop of Boston-Children’s-patented spawning tanks to a robotic feeding system, the upgrade will help raise the large numbers of the striped tropical fish needed to rapidly identify and screen potential new therapeutics. It’s all part of the Children’s Center for Cell Therapy, established in 2013. We put on shoe covers and took a look behind the scenes. (Photos: Katherine Cohen)

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Could a simple injection fix spina bifida before birth?

spina bifida myelomeningocele
Prenatal cell therapy could avoid the need for invasive myelomeningocele surgery.

The neural tube, which becomes the spinal cord and brain, is supposed to close during the first month of prenatal development. In children with spina bifida, it doesn’t close completely, leaving the nerves of the spinal cord exposed and subject to damage. The most common and serious form of spina bifida, myelomeningocele, sets a child up for lifelong disability, causing complications such as hydrocephalus, leg paralysis, and loss of bladder and bowel control.

New research from Boston Children’s Hospital, though still in animal models, suggests that standard amniocentesis, followed by one or more injections of cells into the womb, could be enough to at least partially repair spina bifida prenatally.

Currently, the standard procedure is to operate on infants soon after delivery.

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Cell therapy for early-onset inflammatory bowel disease?

Macrophage therapy early-onset IBD
Giving patients the right kind of immune cells could curb their IBD, research suggests.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is miserable for anyone, but when it strikes a child under age 5, it’s much more severe, usually causing bloody diarrhea, wrenching abdominal pain and stunted growth. Early-onset IBD is rare, but on the rise: For reasons unknown, its incidence is increasing by about 5 percent per year in some parts of the world.

A recently identified form of early-onset IBD shows up within months of birth, causing severe inflammation in the large intestine and abscesses around the anus. Recently linked to genetic mutations in the cellular receptor for a signaling protein, interleukin-10 (IL-10), it can also lead to lymphoma later in life.

As with all early-onset IBD, IL-10-receptor deficiency has no good treatment. A bone marrow transplant is actually curative, but carries many risks, especially in infants.

“We’ve been trying to understand why IBD in these children is so severe and presents so early,” says Dror Shouval, MD, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Boston Children’s Hospital and a fellow in the lab of Scott Snapper, MD, PhD. The beginnings of such an understanding—detailed recently in the journal Immunity—could lead to a new treatment approach for this and perhaps other kinds of early-onset IBD.

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