Stories about: child advocacy

Infant behavior, dyslexia and war orphans: A portrait of Peter Wolff, MD

Peter Wolff MD
Peter Wolff c. 1977 (Ed Fitzgerald/Boston Globe)

Peter Wolff, MD, recently retired from Boston Children’s Hospital after more than 60 years in service to clinical psychiatry, behavioral science research and ethical oversight of human subject research.

When he started as a psychiatrist at Boston Children’s Hospital in 1956, Peter H. Wolff, MD, was seeking a deeper understanding of infant behavior. At a time when psychoanalysis was the framework for understanding the infant psyche, Wolff applied scientific methods used to study animal behavior — carefully observing an animal in its natural environment and seeking to discern patterns. His approach would revolutionize our understanding of infancy.

“We knew a great deal about a stickleback fish, the graylag goose by just watching what they do in the field — field observations — but nobody had ever done that with humans,” Wolff shared in an interview in 2009, “and it seemed to me a logical thing to try to do that.”

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Toward better care models for medically complex children

boy with cerebral palsyThe start of what promises to be a lengthy, multi-part endeavor has begun unfolding on Capitol Hill. It’s an attempt to reform the Medicaid program so that children with medical complexity (those with a single, serious medical condition, or multiple chronic conditions) can receive higher quality care with fewer emergency department visits and fewer hospital admissions.

When you think of medically complex children, think of children living with conditions such as spina bifida or cerebral palsy, children dependent on ventilators or feeding tubes, or children with genetic disorders. They represent just 6 percent of the 43 million children on Medicaid—yet they account for about 40 percent of Medicaid’s spending on children. Their care is often fragmented and poorly coordinated.

The reform effort, led by more than 60 participating pediatric hospitals and supported by the Children’s Hospital Association (CHA), focuses on Medicaid because it’s the single largest insurance provider for children. The backdrop is a cost-conscious Congress that’s the most politically polarized ever, passing the fewest bills ever.

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