Stories about: Christos Papedelis

Science seen: Mapping touch perception in cerebral palsy

sensory brain mapping in cerebral palsy

Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common motor disability of childhood. The brain injury causing CP disrupts touch perception, a key component of motor function. In this brain image from a child with CP (click to enlarge), the blue lines show nerve fibers going to the sensory cortex. The colored cubes at the top represent the parts of the sensory cortex receiving touch signals from the thumb (red cube), middle finger (blue) and little finger (green). An injury in the right side of the brain (dark area) has reduced the number of nerve fibers on that side, reducing touch sensation in the left hand and resulting in weakness.

Christos Papadelis, PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Division of Newborn Medicine hopes to use such sensory mapping information to develop better rehabilitation therapies. P. Ellen Grant, MD, director of the Fetal-Neonatal Neuroimaging and Developmental Science Center, Brian Snyder, MD, of the Cerebral Palsy Program and research assistant Madelyn Rubenstein are part of the team.

 

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