Stories about: circadianbrain

Timing is everything: Circadian rhythms, protein production and disease

Protein production by the clock: mouse over to learn more. (Illustration: Yana Payusova, used with permission.)

Second in a two-part series on circadian biology and disease. Read part 1.

We are oscillating beings. Life itself arose among the oscillations of the waves and the oscillations between darkness and light. The oscillations are carried in our heartbeats and in our circadian sleep patterns.

A new study in Cell shows how these oscillations reach all the way down into our cells and help mastermind the timing of protein production.

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On the clock: Circadian genes may regulate brain plasticity

brain circadian rhythmsFirst in a two-part series on circadian biology and disease. Read part 2.

It’s long been known that a master clock in the hypothalamus, deep in the center of our brain, governs our bodily functions on a 24-hour cycle. It keeps time through the oscillatory activity of timekeeper molecules, much of which is controlled by a gene fittingly named Clock.

It’s also been known that the timekeeper molecules and their regulators live outside this master clock, but what exactly they do there remains mysterious. A new study reveals one surprising function: they appear to regulate the timing of brain plasticity—the ability of the brain to learn from and change in response to experiences.

“We found that a cell-intrinsic Clock may control the normal trajectory of brain development,” says Takao Hensch, PhD, a professor in the Departments of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Neurology at Harvard University and a member of the F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center at Boston Children’s Hospital.

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