Stories about: Clifford Woolf

Neurons from the brain amplify touch sensation. Could they be targeted to treat neuropathic pain?

neuropathic pain amplification circuit
CREDIT: ALBAN LATREMOLIERE/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL/JOHNS HOPKINS

Neuropathic pain is a hard-to-treat chronic pain condition caused by nervous system damage. For people affected, the lightest touch can be intensely painful. A study in today’s Nature may open up a new angle on treatment — and could help explain why mind-body techniques can sometimes help people manage their pain.

“We know that mental activities of the higher brain — cognition, memory, fear, anxiety — can cause you to feel more or less pain,” notes Clifford Woolf, MB, BCh, PhD, director of the F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center at Boston Children’s Hospital. “Now we’ve confirmed a physiological pathway that may be responsible for the extent of the pain. We have identified a volume control in the brain for pain — now we need to learn how to switch it off.”

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Forecasting the convergence of artificial intelligence and precision medicine

Image of artificial DNA, which in combination with other artificial intelligence could contribute to an artificial model of the immune system
Will an artificial model of the immune system be the key to discovering new, precision vaccines?

This is part I of a two-part blog series recapping the 2018 BIO International Convention.

At the 2018 BIO International Convention last week, it was clear what’s provoking scientific minds in industry and academia — or at least those of the Guinness-world-record-making 16,000 people in attendance. Artificial intelligence, machine learning and their implications for tailor-made medicine bubbled up across all BIO’s educational tracks and a majority of discussions about the future state of biotechnology. Panelists from Boston Children’s Hospital also contributed their insights to what’s brewing at the intersection of these burgeoning fields.

Isaac Kohane, MD, PhD, former chair of Boston Children’s Computational Health and Informatics Program, spoke on a panel about how large-scale patient data — if properly harnessed and analyzed for health and disease trends — is a virtual goldmine for precision medicine insights. Patterns gleaned from population health data or electronic health records, for example, could help identify which subgroups of patients who might respond better to specific therapies.

According to Kohane, who is currently the Marion J. Nelson Professor of Biomedical Informatics and Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School (HMS), we will soon be leveraging artificial intelligence to go through patient records and determine exactly what doctors were thinking when they saw patients.

“We’ve seen again and again that data abstraction by artificial intelligence is better than abstraction by human analysts when performed at the scale of millions of clinical notes across thousands of patients,” said Kohane.

And based on what we heard at BIO, artificial intelligence will revolutionize more than patient data mining. It will also transform the way we design precision therapeutics — and even vaccines — from the ground up.

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Six technologies we backed in 2017

Boston Children's Hospital technology

Boston Children’s Hospital’s Technology Development Fund (TDF) to designed to transform early-stage academic technologies into validated, high-impact opportunities for licensees and investors. Since 2009, the hospital has committed $7.6 million to support 76 promising technologies, from therapeutics, diagnostics, medical devices and vaccines to regenerative medicine and healthcare IT projects. The TDF also assists with strategic planning, intellectual property protection, regulatory requirements and business models. Investigators can access mentors, product development experts and technical support through a network of contract research organizations, development partners and industry advisors.

Eight startup companies have spun out since TDF’s creation, receiving $82.4 million in seed funding. They include Affinivax, a vaccine company started with $4 million from the Gates Foundation, and Epidemico, a population health-tracking company acquired by Booz Allen Hamilton. TDF has also launched more than 20 partnerships, received $26 million in follow-on government and foundation funding and generated $4.45 million in licensing revenue.

Here are the projects TDF awarded in 2017, with grants totaling $650,000:

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To address chronic pain, you need to address sleep

chronic pain
Acute or chronic sleep loss exacerbates pain, finds a study that kept mice awake for long periods by entertaining them.

The ongoing opioid epidemic underscores the dire need for new pain medications that aren’t addicting. New research published today in Nature Medicine suggests a possible avenue of relief for people with chronic pain: simply getting more sleep, or, failing that, taking medications to promote wakefulness.

In an unusually rigorous mouse study, either approach relieved pain better than ibuprofen or even morphine. The findings reveal an unexpected role for alertness in setting pain sensitivity.

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Fast-regenerating mice offer clues for stroke, spinal cord and optic nerve injury

axon regeneration CNS
The CAST mouse from Thailand–genetically distinct from most lab mice–may have the right ingredients for nerve regeneration. (Courtesy Jackson Laboratory)

Second in a two-part series on nerve regeneration. Read part 1.

The search for therapies to spur regeneration after spinal cord injury, stroke and other central nervous system injuries hasn’t been all that successful to date. Getting nerve fibers (axons) to regenerate in mammals, typically lab mice, has often involved manipulating oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes to encourage growth, a move that could greatly increase a person’s risk of cancer.

A study published online last week by Neuron, led by the F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center at Boston Children’s Hospital, took a completely different tactic.

Seeing little success at first, the researchers wondered whether they were working with the wrong mice.

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