Stories about: Clifford Woolf

Six technologies we backed in 2017

Boston Children's Hospital technology

Boston Children’s Hospital’s Technology Development Fund (TDF) to designed to transform early-stage academic technologies into validated, high-impact opportunities for licensees and investors. Since 2009, the hospital has committed $7.6 million to support 76 promising technologies, from therapeutics, diagnostics, medical devices and vaccines to regenerative medicine and healthcare IT projects. The TDF also assists with strategic planning, intellectual property protection, regulatory requirements and business models. Investigators can access mentors, product development experts and technical support through a network of contract research organizations, development partners and industry advisors.

Eight startup companies have spun out since TDF’s creation, receiving $82.4 million in seed funding. They include Affinivax, a vaccine company started with $4 million from the Gates Foundation, and Epidemico, a population health-tracking company acquired by Booz Allen Hamilton. TDF has also launched more than 20 partnerships, received $26 million in follow-on government and foundation funding and generated $4.45 million in licensing revenue.

Here are the projects TDF awarded in 2017, with grants totaling $650,000:

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To address chronic pain, you need to address sleep

chronic pain
Acute or chronic sleep loss exacerbates pain, finds a study that kept mice awake for long periods by entertaining them.

The ongoing opioid epidemic underscores the dire need for new pain medications that aren’t addicting. New research published today in Nature Medicine suggests a possible avenue of relief for people with chronic pain: simply getting more sleep, or, failing that, taking medications to promote wakefulness.

In an unusually rigorous mouse study, either approach relieved pain better than ibuprofen or even morphine. The findings reveal an unexpected role for alertness in setting pain sensitivity.

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Fast-regenerating mice offer clues for stroke, spinal cord and optic nerve injury

axon regeneration CNS
The CAST mouse from Thailand–genetically distinct from most lab mice–may have the right ingredients for nerve regeneration. (Courtesy Jackson Laboratory)

Second in a two-part series on nerve regeneration. Read part 1.

The search for therapies to spur regeneration after spinal cord injury, stroke and other central nervous system injuries hasn’t been all that successful to date. Getting nerve fibers (axons) to regenerate in mammals, typically lab mice, has often involved manipulating oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes to encourage growth, a move that could greatly increase a person’s risk of cancer.

A study published online last week by Neuron, led by the F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center at Boston Children’s Hospital, took a completely different tactic.

Seeing little success at first, the researchers wondered whether they were working with the wrong mice.

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