Stories about: clinical practice guidelines

Guidelines urging more cholesterol screening do not result in more kids on drugs

heart_screening cropped ShutterstockDespite recent national pediatric guidelines recommending identification and treatment of children with familial hypercholesterolemia, the use of lipid-lowering treatment has been flat over the past decade in real-world pediatric practice, finds a large multicenter study.

Justin Zachariah, MD, MPH, a pediatric cardiologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, presented the findings this week at the 2013 American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions. He believes they dispel some critiques of the recent guidelines, particularly concerns that more screening would result in overmedicating the pediatric population.

Extending beyond 2008 recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the 2011 National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s pediatric guidelines call for universal lipid screening and medical treatment for children at highest risk for early cardiovascular disease. One such high-risk condition is familial hypercholesterolemia, a genetic disorder characterized by high blood cholesterol levels, specifically very high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or “bad” cholesterol) and early coronary events.

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Scaling up quality improvement: How do we motivate providers?

Engaging clinicians in change will require a cultural shift. (David Oliva/Wikimedia Commons)
Engaging clinicians in change will require a cultural shift. (David Oliva/Wikimedia Commons)
Alyssa Bianca Velasco, ScB, is a clinical data specialist for the Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs) program at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Reducing health care costs doesn’t have to involve making sacrifices in patient safety or quality of care or holding clinicians to rigid guidelines. Over the past several years, Boston Children’s Hospital has rolled out a methodology known as Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs). Described in the May issue of Health Affairs, SCAMPs are based on the idea that clinicians should be able to diverge from established medical best practices, provided they document the reasons and track the results—in essence making continual data-driven modifications to practice.

The success of SCAMPs in reducing practice variability and costs and improving outcomes at Boston Children’s has led other institutions, one by one, to adopt them. In the next phase, we plan to expand SCAMPs much more broadly, creating a network of hospitals that will pool pertinent clinical data into a centralized non-profit institution, the Institute for Relevant Clinical Data Analytics (IRCDA).

I am part of a team that is providing training, analytics and IT support to help make that large-scale implementation happen.

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Reducing unnecessary care: The SCAMPs manifesto

Can we reduce health care costs without rationing? (Image: Fibonacci Blue via Flickr)

We all know the problem: The cost of health care needs to come down. About five years ago, pediatric cardiologists at Children’s Hospital Boston realized it was critical to practice more cost-effectively. “Most of the money that is going to be removed from the federal budget to reduce budgetary deficits is going to come from health care in one fashion or another,” cardiologist-in-chief James Lock told an audience of senior Children’s physicians last month. “There’s no question we were under a tremendous amount of pressure.”

Seeking to eliminate unnecessary care and testing, Lock’s team first turned to clinical practice guidelines, or CPGs, a tool meant to standardize “best practices.” But it soon became clear that CPGs were ineffective, giving no insight into how to improve care or how to deal with unexpected findings. Even worse, over time, many mandated CPGs have been shown to be wrong by subsequent data.

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