Stories about: clinical trial

From mice to humans: Genetic syndromes may be key to finding autism treatment

Boy and a mouse eye-to-eye
(Aliaksei Lasevich/stock.adobe.com)

A beautiful, happy little girl, Emma is the apple of her parents’ eyes and adored by her older sister. The only aspect of her day that is different from any other 6-month-old’s is the medicine she receives twice a day as part of a clinical trial for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC).

Emma’s mother was just 20 weeks pregnant when she first heard the words “tuberous sclerosis,” a rare genetic condition that causes tumors to grow in various organs of the body. Prenatal imaging showed multiple benign tumors in Emma’s heart.

Emma displays no symptoms of her disease, except for random “spikes” on her electroencephalogram (EEG) picked up by her doctors at Boston Children’s Hospital. The medication she is receiving is part of the Preventing Epilepsy Using Vigabatrin in Infants with TSC (PREVeNT) trial. Her mother desperately hopes it is the active antiepileptic drug, vigabatrin, rather than placebo.

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Taking the toxicity out of stem cell transplants

Colombian twins Miranda and Olivia Agudelo (with their parents) were the first patients in a clinical trial aimed at making the bone marrow transplant process less toxic.

One thing that most people don’t realize about stem cell transplants (also called bone marrow or hematopoietic stem cell transplants) is that for patients, the transplant itself is probably the easiest part of the process. The grueling part is the preparation for a transplant, called conditioning.

There’s been a lot done at Dana-Farber/Children’s Hospital Cancer Center (DF/CHCC) and elsewhere to make conditioning less toxic. With a new clinical trial in a rare genetic syndrome called dyskeratosis congenita (DC), doctors at DF/CHCC are taking an even bolder step.

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There is a cure for sickle cell disease…for some

Maryam Idan (center), a young Iraqi girl with sickle cell disease, was lucky: she could be cured with a stem cell transplant. Leslie Lehmann, MD, wants to make such transplants an option for more sickle cell patients.

I was surprised when chatting recently with Leslie Lehmann, MD, clinical director of the Stem Cell Transplantation Program at Dana-Farber/Children’s Hospital Cancer Center (DF/CHCC). She turned to me and asked, “Did you know there’s been a cure for sickle cell disease for nearly 40 years?”

I had to admit that I didn’t. I’ve always thought of sickle cell—a painful and debilitating disease caused by an inherited mutation that makes red blood cells stiffen into a characteristic sickled shape—as a chronic disease to be managed, not one that could be cured.

I’m not alone in that belief. Lehmann often asks this question when she give talks for medical students, residents and other physicians. Their reaction is puzzlement, then a shaking of heads.

The cure is there, though. It’s a stem cell (aka bone marrow) transplant. The catch is that it’s not available to everyone—but for reasons that Lehmann thinks can be overcome.

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Stopping the pain of sickle cell disease at its source

sickle cell pain
The pain of sickle cell disease can be unbearable. But there’s a new view emerging on how that pain comes about, one that has spurred a new clinical trial aimed at stopping the pain at its source. (stevendepolo/Flickr)

If there’s one thing most patients with sickle cell disease will agree on, it’s that sickle cell hurts. A lot.

The characteristic rigid, sticky, C-shaped red blood cells of this inherited disease tend to get stuck in the small blood vessels of the body. If so many get stuck in a vessel that they cut off blood flow, the body sends out a warning signal in the form of searing pain that doctors call a pain or vaso-occlusive crisis (at least, that’s the historic view; more on that in a minute). The pain can happen anywhere in the body, but most often occurs in the bones of the arms, legs, chest and spine.

Preventing flare-ups—and stopping them when they happen—is a major part of the care plan for any patient with sickle cell. Right now doctors try to avoid pain crises largely by diluting a patient’s blood with fluids or transfusions, thereby keeping the numbers of sickled cells relatively low.

What these treatments don’t do is tackle the pain directly. Doctors can use pain medications, but over time, patients can become tolerant to painkillers, requiring ever-larger doses. What’s needed is something that can stop the complex cascade of events that ignite a pain crisis.

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Taking a targeted approach when leukemia comes back

Lewis Silverman, MD, thinks he may have a powerful new tool for treating children with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. (VashiDonsk/Wikimedia Commons)

The news that your child has cancer always comes as a shock, but for one cancer, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), parents can take comfort in the fact that doctors are really good at treating it. The cure rate for ALL has, over the last 40 years, climbed to nearly 90 percent.

Less comforting is the fact that some 10 to 20 percent of children who initially respond well to treatment suffer a relapse within five years. And right now, the drugs at our disposal aren’t very good at turning a relapse back into a remission.

“We have standard treatment regimens for newly diagnosed and relapsed ALL, both of which rely heavily on corticosteroids like prednisone and dexamethasone,” says Lewis Silverman, MD, director of the Pediatric Hematologic Malignancy Service at Dana-Farber/Children’s Hospital Cancer Center (DF/CHCC). “But we know that leukemias with any level of steroid resistance are more likely to relapse. Anything we can do to overcome that resistance would let us help many children.”

Silverman has launched a clinical trial that will try a new strategy for tearing down ALL cells’ barriers against corticosteroids.

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