Stories about: communication

‘Handoff’ tool cuts harmful medical errors 30 percent

Patient handoff I-PASSIt’s increasingly clear that good health care is as much about communication as about using the best medical or surgical techniques. That’s especially true during the “handoff”—the transfer of a patient’s care from provider to provider during hospital shift changes. It’s a time when information is more likely to fall through the cracks or get distorted.

Now there’s solid proof that focusing on communications counts. Last week, The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) published a paper showing that implementing a set of handoff procedures and training tools led to a 30 percent drop in injuries from medical errors across the nine participating sites.

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Augmentative and alternative communication: A new generation of tools for autism

With initial help from her mother, Kailee West, 6, quickly masters the basics of Puddingstone Place, an interactive virtual environment that helps children with autism develop language skills.
With initial help from her mother, Kailee West, 6, quickly masters the basics of Puddingstone Place, an interactive virtual environment that helps children with autism develop language skills.

In the 1990s, Facilitated Communication (FC), in which assistants “facilitate” the typing of thoughts by minimally verbal children by supporting their hands, began raising hopes in the autism community. The unproven procedure caught fire, and Syracuse University established a nationally recognized Facilitated Communication Institute.

Upon closer examination, though, doubts emerged. The messages were surprisingly sophisticated and written by children who often were not even looking at the keyboard. Critics charged that the words were actually those of the facilitator rather than the patient. Studies and organizations began discrediting FC.

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Improved ‘handoff’ communication curbs medical errors

A bundled "handoff" program reduced medical errors in a study reported in JAMA.Medical errors are a leading cause of death and injury in America, and an estimated 80 percent of serious medical errors involve some form of miscommunication, particularly during the transfer of care from one provider to the next. However, a study published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association demonstrates that standardizing written and verbal communication during these patient “handoffs” can substantially reduce medical errors without burdening existing workflows.

The study followed 1,255 patient admissions to two separate inpatient units at Boston Children’s Hospital—half occurring before a new verbal and written handoff program was introduced (July to September 2009) and half after (from November 2009 to January 2010).

After implementation, providers spent more time communicating face-to-face in quiet areas conducive to conversation. There were fewer omissions or miscommunications about patient data during handoffs. And medical errors decreased 45.8 percent.

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